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Old 07-18-2016, 08:50 PM   #1
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1976 Argosy 26
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76 Argosy - best floor covering

I sure can use forum opinions on what is best floor type covering after just removed original faded avocado shag carpet and pad. Too many choices, factors of weight, shifting, care and cost. What o use. linoleum carpet wood Prego cork and do on - petrified by indecision. Help.
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Old 07-19-2016, 12:54 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ky76Argosy View Post
I sure can use forum opinions on what is best floor type covering after just removed original faded avocado shag carpet and pad. Too many choices, factors of weight, shifting, care and cost. What o use. linoleum carpet wood Prego cork and do on - petrified by indecision. Help.
I sorry that I can't answer your question as I looking for some assistance also as to what is recommended to replace the linoleum. I did a floor repair and I cannot get the old linoleum to lay flat, plus I swear it shrank.

So I'm jumping in here to see if you get any input.

Thanks!
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Old 07-22-2016, 06:04 PM   #3
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I feel your pain. We are doing a 66 Tradewind reno. I really agonized about the flooring decision. I did a lot of research. And here's what happened. When we first bought the trailer we were going full bore on the work. At that time several years ago Allure Trafficmaster vinyl planks were highly recommended on this site. So that's what we bought - in the cork pattern. We got sidetracked by some other projects and now we are back into it but the info here now on the Allure is not very good. Lots of issues with gapping in the joints due to temperature changes. So I was determined to find another option. I found two that I liked and got good reviews here. Marmoleum and luxury vinyl sheeting. Both of these were pricey. So since we were already replacing practically every appliance and doing more than we first thought, we decided to make a choice for the budget and use the flooring we had already bought. We know there may be issues but a friend has supplied some great commercial carpet tiles that we will use if we have unacceptable problems. If we use the trailer more than we expect then We may at some point replace the flooring. But we had this Allure so we're using it. Good luck with your choice. Valarie
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Old 07-22-2016, 06:35 PM   #4
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I replaced faded stinky factory carpet with commercial remnant berber carpet, pro installed for lot less money than any thing else. I don't like manf. wood or vinyl on floors. We camp in all kinds of terrain never take shoes off, vac. once in 5 yrs. still like new no stains and this is lite colored carpet, but have some small sq. at entry door plus vinyl runner down middle of traffic area. I also have lite color berber on concrete in walk out basement to in ground pool, both installed with foam padding. The nay sayers no but talk to good carpet installer, will tell you exc. choice. Only time shoes of if muddy.
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Old 07-22-2016, 10:18 PM   #5
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In both my Argosy's I installed snap together floating laminate. If it is any heavier than the carpet is is not noticeable.
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Old 07-23-2016, 12:12 AM   #6
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We glued down engineered wood flooring 4 years ago and can't be happier. Not only do we travel with our Argosy but also use it for a hunting cabin. Red Alabama mud stained vinyl and completely ruined berber carpet. Since installation of the hardwood we have towed somewhere between 10 and 15 thousand miles with no ill effects. We lucked into 10 boxes of flooring that someone else had rejected due to dark spots in the grain. Flooring companies loss was our gain.
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Old 07-23-2016, 12:51 AM   #7
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76 Argosy -- best floor covering

Greetings Ky76Argosy!

The answer to flooring selection is one that often is largely based on personal preference. I am not a fan of carpeting in my home or in my RV so that helped me to narrow my selections.

For my Overlander, I chose Congoleum sheet vinyl and have been happy with its performance over the past decade. While I was warned when making this choice that the one seam that was required wouldn't hold up to the extremes of the RV environment, this has proven not to be the case -- the seam is just as tight and inconspicuous as it was when the Fowlers handled the installation (Fowler RV Interiors).

For my Minuet, I chose Armstrong laminate floor coverings. The Minuet has composite aluminum floors so that ruled out sheet vinyl. Again, I was warned about the potential for problems with this floor covering in the extremes of the RV environment. While there is some movement in the flooring, it doesn't appear to be beyond its design parameters and I am thrilled with its performance nearly a decade later. I credit the Armstrong Quiet Step Underlayment for helping to make this a successful installation over the irregularities in the composite aluminum floors. This installation was also handled by the Fowlers (Fowler RV Interiors).

I usually travel with at least one Chihuahua so the ease of cleaning of either of the above options was a prime consideration for me when making the floor covering decision.

Kevin
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Old 07-23-2016, 12:06 PM   #8
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The nice thing about limited sq footage is you can afford luxury flooring that would be unaffordable for a house. The PO of my rig installed distressed oak flooring. Looks great, easy to clean, damage resistant and water tolerant! Now if I could only afford to upholster with wear-forever leather...
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Old 07-23-2016, 01:22 PM   #9
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We used Bruce engineered hardwood flooring. Glued it down (against conventional wisdom). Three years and thousands of miles later, it looks new (except for the spot where I dropped something sharp and heavy) and cleans easily. Would do it again. Have seen other options that work very nicely too. Some of the plank vinyl etc. seem to do well.
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Old 07-23-2016, 01:24 PM   #10
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I forgot to say, yes, even in the bathroom.
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Old 07-23-2016, 02:20 PM   #11
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commercial vinyl flooring

I pulled out the carpet and my sub floor was solid but the zigzag gang nails had to be hammered down after each trip and it was uneven so I glued and screwed down a layer of 1/8" plywood and installed Armstrong commercial vinyl 12" squares in dark blue and a beige that is a very close match to the original vinyl covered aluminum wall color. I floored all the walking surfaces and then had a heavy rag rug that was in the same colors cut and bound to fit the hall, bath and rear bedroom. It is great. Just sweep and wax occasionally. Water spills just bead up and the rugs can be washed in a laundromat washer. I get great comments at every open house.

The plywood is available at Home Depot in 4' x 8' sheets and I used standard construction adhesive and screws about every 12" to 18". I cut thin cardboard as a pattern for the cuts around the kitchen and bath walls and pulled the dinette out and floored under it. If you do this installation you should leave about 1/8" clearance at the walls for expansion & contraction and movement during travel ( rolling earthquake) and install each color with the grain in the opposite direction. I did have had a small area chip along the bath wall where I did not leave any room.
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Old 07-23-2016, 06:12 PM   #12
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Question Scope of Repair

I have an 1982 with the original carpet. I was wondering when you talk about replacement of the carpet - what was the total scope of the project. Were you just replacing the carpet or were you striping the total interior? Since it appears that the carpet was installed prior to the rest of the interior did you remove the cabinets or was it just replacing the carpet in the walk area?
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Old 07-31-2016, 01:03 PM   #13
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1976 Argosy 26
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Flooring selection

Thanks Everyone the info on flooring is almost overwhelming but there are recurrent themes. 1) wear-use needs 2) water protection 3) movement 4) weight 5) extent of renovation 6) cost and I add my on concern 7) ease of future renovation/maintenance. So, still viewing all options as moving forward with my project.

I see some have mentioned sealing sub-floor, pros-cons. I see linseed oil mentioned, and any so any opinions on that as a sealer is welcome. I used on home wood floors and furniture and it is thin so saturates cracks, staple/screw holes, sub-floor joints and even creep under interior walls to hard to reach areas.

I am newbie 2 months owner, my 76 Argosy 26 is rear bath model, and that is a later planned project if not satisfied bathroom originality floor feels solid but 40yo bathtub always a probable question.

So in this phase of my project includes some front sub-floor repair by water fill, front door and sink areas so gaucho galley back mid bed to bath (but not floor to ceiling cabinets) so good access with straight lines. I am not intending glam, or overpricing my neighborhood.

Questions:
Can you use linseed oil to seal top of sub-floor with repeat applications soaking top, edges and joints hoping to enhance water protection without trapping water if intrusion, spill or leak. Or will that affect flooring options?

Does linseed oil trap moisture or affect glue down flooring with later repairs or new/upgraded flooring?
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Old 08-01-2016, 12:22 AM   #14
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Questions:
Can you use linseed oil to seal top of sub-floor with repeat applications soaking top, edges and joints hoping to enhance water protection without trapping water if intrusion, spill or leak. Or will that affect flooring options?

Does linseed oil trap moisture or affect glue down flooring with later repairs or new/upgraded flooring?[/QUOTE]

I have been a woodworker for many years and I would be concerned about linseed oil inhibiting the ability of future glue to adhere. There are also other concerns with regard to Linseed oil. The following list of problems was taken from "The Natural Handyman"(online Written by Jerry Alonzyin) a discussion about linseed oil uses around the home. Some don't apply but some should be considered:

Some of the problems with straight linseed oil, boiled or raw, are:

1. Sometimes linseed oil can take forever to dry... or stays sticky or doesn't dry at all! This is a nightmare situation that happens too often when linseed oil is applied either (1) too thickly, (2) onto damp materials or (3) when the temperature is too cold. Thinning linseed oil with turpentine can help somewhat, but even with thinning it is important to apply thin, multiple coats but allow each coat to dry before applying the next!

2. No UV (ultraviolet) light resistance... UV causes more damage to exposed wood than any other factor, destroying wood fibers and setting it up for attack by mildew, fungus, and insects.

3. Linseed oil is mildew food... Many vegetable oils are food products for humans... all vegetable oils are food products for mildew! Linseed oil is not completely denatured, so it can encourage rather than discourage mildew growth.

4. Linseed oil does not harden sufficiently to offer enough resistance to abrasion to be a suitable deck floor preservative... at least by today's standards. Linseed oil has been used for interior wood floors, but it must be waxed for durability!

5. Difficult to remove from wood... Multiple coats of linseed oil are gummy and difficult to remove fully for refinishing.

6. Linseed oil dries through oxidation, and the process releases heat. The faster the oxidation, the more the greater the heat. A pile of rags or paper towels soaked with linseed oil can actually start burning without warning, leading to the manufacturer's warning that all oil-soaked rags should be stored under water in a covered, metal container, or washed before storage or disposal. (I am an architect and have seen a fire in a church being remodeled that started spontaneously in rags left after oiling woodwork).

The jist of his article is: Commercial sealants (some of which contain linseed or other drying oils) though more expensive, outperform "natural" linseed oil. And since these products tend to be relatively pricey, the buyer must weight cost against durability and long useful life. Let the buyer beware! (For me, I always choose the most durable and reliable)

I would look for another product to seal the subfloor possibly polyurethane in a formulation for marine use.
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