Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-13-2014, 01:55 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
TOOLS of Boondocking / Rockdocking

Tools. When you need one... you do not have it handy when needed.

My first two years with the 2006 Safari required tools and screws.

Cabinet doors coming loose or falling off. Short screws falling out and needing to be replaced with a larger diameter screw to keep tight. Linoleum shrinking and needing flat headed tacks to keep the ends from curling up. Plumbing coming loose. Faucets coming loose or needing adjustments. ... and just preventive tools in the event of something else needs attention.

One solution was getting the "tool set" that had metric and US size sockets, straight and philips head screwdrivers, needle nose pliers, pliers, adjustable "monkey" wrench, hex head wrenches of the most frequently needed sizes. The better the quality of the set, the less likely the sockets will split or the ratchet will internally break. Hammer.

For removing tire and wheel, a breaker bar and socket with a short extension to make the process easier.

Now that the 2006 is about 8 years older... I carry several complete sets of inner and outer wheel bearings and container of high quality bearing grease. Just in case... So far all I have needed to do is wipe and grease the bearings and adjust the slack out of the bearings while tightening them back onto the axle. Equipment to remove the pressed bearings and seals as well as something to press them back into the drum.

Now that I am more comfortable that the need for TOO many tools has been relaxed. I left the collapsing tubed ladder the last two trips... then needed it to inspect the A/C on the roof when it quit, while in Las Vegas this month. I started carrying the ladder when the open vent cover blew off while in the West Wendover, Nevada parking lot... No wind when we went into the Casino and no wind when we found parts of plastic in the parking lot! So we put the vent covers on and took care of that happening again!

I understand that many people are not mechanically inclined to do any repairs or "fixes" while on the road. Well... it might be worth reconsidering at least the bare essentials for minor repairs. Those of us who worked on automobiles when you could actually "work on them" learned that what will go wrong, will. Even if you do not camp in remote areas, having an electrical hand held screw driver with various bits and drilling bits is a great idea to have along.

This subject is really an "open conversation" of discovering what tools did you need and now carry along on ALL of your travel adventures in your Airstream or other brand of trailer. Sometimes a "hack saw" or a foot of bailing wire is all it took to make a temporary repair to get back onto the road for a repair.

Sometimes just ONE fuse will save yourself from major discomfort! So, not to make this first post a monograph of my experiences, I want to learn from those who travel much differently than we do... off the paved roads.

WHAT tool or tools have you found to be indispensable?
__________________

__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 02:35 PM   #2
retired USA/USAF

 
2001 30' Excella
Somerset , New Jersey
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,158
Like Ray I like to think I'm prepared. A good boy scout so to speak. I have a special tool box that contains just "stuff" I put together for electrical repairs. Wire strippers, extra wire, tape, screw drivers, butt connectors, shrink tubing among other things. I have a piece of 7 wire cable and a spare 7 wire plug. Just in case. OH, wire zip-ties. Don't leave home without them and duct tape. I could go on and on but you get the idea.

See ya on the road sometime. Maybe you'll have just what I need.
__________________

__________________
Roger in NJ

" Democracy is the worst form of government. Except for all the rest"
Winston Churchill 1948

TAC - NJ 18

polarlyse is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 04:54 PM   #3
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
I have started carrying a fairly extensive recovery kit. Over 100 feet of rope and chain and a come-a-long, plus a folding shovel and axe.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 05:49 PM   #4
Lost in America
 
mojo's Avatar
 
2015 27' FB International
2006 25' Safari FB SE
2004 19' International CCD
Oak Creek , Arizona
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,507
In addition to stuff described above, I carry some loppers for pruning that one errant branch that keeps me from sliding into a spot without a long scratch on the trailer.
__________________
This is the strangest life I've ever known - J. Morrison

The Nest Egg - 2015 Airstream International Serenity 27FB
2017 Silverado 2500HD Chevy Duramax Diesel

mojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 10:57 PM   #5
3 Rivet Member
 
2003 25' Safari
Riverside , California
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 234
It's always been my experience(with a few notable exceptions)when you go prepared nothing goes wrong.The pre-trip prep I do varies between extreme and none depending on the destination and route.A folding suitecase type set of tools makes for quick access and helps to insure nothing gets left behind,A good size tool bag carries the rest of the tools not found in the kit.A hilift jack takes up permanent residence in both trucks and the Jeep,Forgetting to load it one time could be disastrous in some situations.2 spares for the truck for some trips and a portable high quality tire repair kit.Along with a 12 volt 1/2 hp compressor if any serious off roading is on the agenda.Fluids for all the different gear boxes if we plan on playing hard.Since all vehicles these days are drive by wire a good scanner can be a matter of driving home or not if you are far off the beaten path
__________________
2003 25' Safari
2005 Ram 2500 4x4
1994 Ram 2500 4x4
2015 Toyota Tacoma trd 4x4
2000 Jeep Wrangler 4x4
Bob4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2014, 03:53 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
DUCT Tape!

Polarlysc mentioned Duct Tape. Bring a roll of good sticky Duct Tape. When our flimsy vent cover blew off in the Casino parking lot, I used duct tape from the inside and sealed the opening. Worked perfect until we could get to Airstream in Reno, Nevada, borrowed a ladder, buy a vent cover and put it back together.

Once we took a chainsaw back to New Mexico to get back to our camping spot, since many small diameter trees were blow downs and you can never count on the Forest Service to do it off the main roads.

Grease for your hitch and ball.

Rubber disposable gloves to keep the grease off of your hands.

Tweezers for stickers, prickly pear needles, thorns, cacti... dogs always need it.

A COMPASS. It just has to work. Check it at home. A must off the grid.
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2014, 06:18 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
RickDavis's Avatar

 
1961 24' Tradewind
1969 29' Ambassador
1970 21' Globetrotter
Jamestown , Tennessee
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,781
I leave the welder and lathe at home. Pretty much everything else resides in the truck
__________________
Rick Davis 1602 K8DOC
61 tradewind, plus a few others
13 Ram 2500 TD
99 Dodge TD 577K miles

RickDavis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2014, 06:30 PM   #8
4 Rivet Member
 
2004 16' International CCD
Chicagoland , Illinois
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 265
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
...a fairly extensive recovery kit. Over 100 feet of rope and chain and a come-a-long, plus a folding shovel and axe.
Sweet!

I think a big-azz 12 VDC winch would look so cool on an AS trailer even though it might not be very practical. Mounting some nice recovery hooks on the trailer's frame might be more value-added.
__________________
Airrogant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2014, 01:53 PM   #9
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airrogant View Post
Sweet!

I think a big-azz 12 VDC winch would look so cool on an AS trailer even though it might not be very practical. Mounting some nice recovery hooks on the trailer's frame might be more value-added.
Have had those and have come to the conclusion that, as a practical matter for real-world recovery, enough chain and a good come-a-long is better.

Electric self-recovery winches are expensive, maintenance intensive, big, heavy, require a big, heavy mount. But the main problem is that they aren't versatile, so if you need to pull backwards or to one side you're out of luck. That happens surprisingly often.

In practice, most of the time it's more effective to pull with another vehicle. When there's no one around to help or no way to get another vehicle lined up right, the come-a-long works ok.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2014, 03:18 PM   #10
Full Time Adventurer
 
BoldAdventure's Avatar
 
2007 27' International CCD FB
Nomadic , USA
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2,743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
Have had those and have come to the conclusion that, as a practical matter for real-world recovery, enough chain and a good come-a-long is better.

Electric self-recovery winches are expensive, maintenance intensive, big, heavy, require a big, heavy mount. But the main problem is that they aren't versatile, so if you need to pull backwards or to one side you're out of luck. That happens surprisingly often.

In practice, most of the time it's more effective to pull with another vehicle. When there's no one around to help or no way to get another vehicle lined up right, the come-a-long works ok.
What??? NO, we've been overlanding for awhile now, and I can tell you, winches are not that heavy, and on a mount with front and rear receiver + a pulley and tree strap you can pull sides ways. Done it plenty of times. Synetic line is easy to maintain and light weight. Winch will always bet your chain, other vehicle and come-a-long all day long.

Now if you're winch is mounted in a bumper, than yes all some of your statement is true. Won't be terribly effective pulling in reverse. Steel bumpers also add A LOT of weight to a vehicle.

Winch in a receiver mount is always the best bet, but there are limitations (strength wise)

Chain though is pretty heavy. And you'll still need a tree strap. And have fun cranking that thing. Hope you don't need to get out of a jam in a hurry.

Pulling with another vehicle is not always the best way either. It can be dangerous, the other vehicle will need proper recovery points to hook too, you'll need room to pull, the proper traction conditions and proper amount of straps/chain. Did I mention it can be dangerous. Seen to many dummies destroy their vehicles, the trail and property from hooking up a chain and just revving the engine.

=============

As I mentioned above, I've been into expedition style overlanding for a couple years. But now we are moving on to become full-time Airstreamers. I've got a tool box setup that I've used with our old rig. Over time you figure out which tools you use the most on your vehicle, and I suspect Airstream.

I also have a number of specialty tools, but I've come to recognize the ones I need on a road trip and the ones I can leave at home.

For example, Tie Rod puller, you'd be amazed how often you break them offroading, so I carry one with me.
__________________
Family of 4 living, working & exploring the USA in our Airstream.
OUR BLOG | FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM
BoldAdventure is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014, 04:13 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
John&Vicki's Avatar
 
1990 25' Excella
Sisters , Oregon
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 887
Images: 4
Great post on boondocking:

Finding Magical RV Boondocking | Technomadia

Check out their app. Seems boondocking opportunities are vast!

Cheers,
John
__________________
John & Vicki
WBCCI #4291

Grown men don't need leaders. ~ Edward Abbey
John&Vicki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014, 09:30 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
PharmGeek's Avatar

 
2014 30' FB FC Bunk
Hoover , Alabama
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 3,377
I've began researching my region - Alabama

It's tricky so far - hard to know if my 30 foot rig will have access to some places I find with bits of details on the net - have not tried pay apps yet - will take some scouting I suspect


Sent from my iPhone using Airstream Forums
__________________
“The atoms of our bodies are traceable to stars that manufactured them...We are not figuratively, but literally stardust.”


PharmGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2014, 11:57 AM   #13
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
PharmGeek has one advantage when looking for a boondocking spot.

The part of the 30' trailer BEHIND the axles can hang out/over without a problem, unless there are trees, boulders, structures, poles, posts, picnic table or something that would prevent you from doing so. Finding a flat spot at some sites is tough. With my wife spotting, I can park the trailer in great spaces that appear to have little extra room to spare yet everything fits nicely without injury to the trailer.

Boondocking in Idaho is an example. If you can find a camping spot in the back country that does not need massive amounts of leveling... you have done well. It takes some work to find even a hunter's camp site that looks flat from a distance and is out of level by FEET!

Northwest Montana... I have had to camp on mine tailings in the back country. If a flat area was found... the brush and trees prevented us from using the space! The lower elevation and moisture makes it green and the vegetation thick. The commercial campgrounds are better, but dark from tall trees. Lake side camping is usually commercial or State operated but worth it. Flathead Lake on the west side has wonderful State camp sites. It deteriorates after that.
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2014, 12:50 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
Today I am giving up the foot locker of tools and hardware that I have hauled every time we went camping. It was after the first year that we were able to make our 2006 23 foot Safari on and off the road...worthy. So I have carried tools to repair anything... and am reducing about 80 pounds... today.

But... one item I will carry. Actually a spare part that I needed on our first trip. Our Zip Dee awning on one side was very difficult to slide the aluminum internal rod out. It was like that when we purchased the trailer, new. The sales people said it would loosen up in time.

Loosen up? It had actually been bent. Trying to figure it out on our first outing was easy. I pulled the rod out and, sure enough, it was bent. I put it out onto a flat surface, took a piece of 2x4 lumber, and hammered it as flat as possible. It worked, Zip Dee actually sent a replacement rod at no charge when I inquired about the bent rod. The "Contour Claw Bar" is the hook on the end that connects the two supports. On the original this had a cracked casting and came apart when setting up for a later trip. I found some hardware to hold it together, but ordered an extra... just in case I ever needed another.

I still have it and it is the same as the 2014 Zip Dee Claw Bar. The claw comes with a pin and instructions. It is all one piece. I would recommend having a loose one, just in case. Even if you never need it, or think you will not. Because if you do need it... you are up a creek without a paddle.

I have discovered over many years of being prepared. If you DO have a spare... you will never need one. When you DO NEED a part... it is needed the first trip you decided it was not necessary.
__________________

__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
West Boondocking or Rockdocking by Trial AND ERROR Ray Eklund Boondocking 21 07-16-2013 04:41 AM
West Rockdocking Tools of the Trail Ray Eklund Boondocking 23 07-25-2010 12:13 PM
West Boondocking the Rockdocking Ray Eklund Boondocking 28 08-03-2008 12:25 PM
Tools, Tools, and more Tools FC7039 General Repair Forum 36 03-14-2008 04:39 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.