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Old 08-02-2015, 12:34 PM   #43
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2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
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Boulder City , Nevada
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Boondocking has its comfort range of temperatures...

The last three weeks in Nevada, we have experienced 37F (6500' elevation) as a low and 110F (2800' elevation) as a high temperature. Although the length of an Airstream will determine the access of your trailer into areas that are not flat, level or graded creating variable angles that can impact your tow vehicle or trailer's rear bumper.

With the low clearances of standard equipment Airstreams, the shorter the trailer the better the access to variable angles of ingress and egress. My experience is with a 23 foot and a 25 foot Airstream. Those with 16 foot to 22 foot might want to give their comments. Our 25 foot is probably the longest Airstream for Boondocking... although permanent NFS campsites are as close to a flat surface campsite one could expect. All it takes is one unimproved wash that creates a problem of dragging your rear bumper or grey/black plumbing to understand the perils of not paying attention to an Airstream's limited clearance. Once you have arrived at your destination, the limits of your trailer become evident immediately. Comfort zone of daily temperature ranges...

Temperatures Off the Grid will limit your seasons and comfort zone. Our experience, keeping in mind the Full Timing individuals, eliminates many areas from the extreme climate areas in the cold and hot spectrum.

Without a source of power during 110F days and 85F evenings, an Airstream will not cool down to the outside temperature of 85F until early in the morning. This is southern Nevada below 3,000 feet elevation.

At 6500 feet elevation near Pioche, Nevada the temperature maximums we experienced were 37F-45F before sunrise and 80F-89F during the daytime. Absolutely wonderful and about three hours northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada.

It is much more difficult to warm up or cool down a longer Airstream. By using the awning, window coverings, vents, opening or closing windows, finding a shady spot among trees (if any trees exist) along the sunrise and sunset exposure, and other Boondocking tricks to maintain a comfortable interior temperature. Like... on hot summer days, align your trailer in an East to West with the awning keeping a shady comfort area for sitting outside while the trailer cools down for the evening. We tend to remain outside until after 10PM while the interior trailer temperatures get closest to a reasonable sleeping range. Later to bed does help sleeping sounder, we have discovered!

As I had posted somewhere on the Forum, we had a 121F day and 111F evening inside our Airstream at Lake Meade, Nevada in June. This was in the shade of tall trees. I slept on a concrete picnic table where the outside temperature did drop into the mid to upper 80'sF. Inside the trailer... 111F.

Winter offers the opposite extremes. Even cold to cool mornings, you want to expose your door side "towards sunrise" for a quick warmup when at elevation, as the temperature can go from 27F to 75F not long after sunrise, leaving the front door open to heat the trailer's interior in the process. Radiant heat on your aluminum can be a curse or a blessing...

When in the desert with low to moderate humidity, we can now sleep with 85F evenings and not be too uncomfortable. Below 80F is optimum, but at lower elevations, not likely. We have seen it all in the months of June and July. Full Timers... you had better be on the move when the seasons change. Depending on your range of camping, a smaller trailer can be an asset! Our 25 foot for our travels is pushing the possibilities of comfort zone of temperature ranges. Now that we have power to run our Dometic air conditioner we can maintain a fairly consistent upper 70F to lower 80F for sleeping... not even considering opening a window, keeping the two ceiling vents open to keep the humidity regulated, but not operating the fans to draw out the cool air. (Provided by the RV campsite full hookups this time!)

Currently it is 90F/28% humidity outside and 79F/18% humidity inside the trailer, the AC set at 77F running consistently. The rear bed area at 83F as the sunrise heats the narrow Eastward facing end of our trailer. Next week we will be heading back to Colorado where our home is at 6300F elevation and the comfort range in the 55F to 90F with low humidity as fairly standard expectations. (Sometimes we wonder why we would leave such a perfect Summer location... with plenty of reason to head south in the Winter!)

When planning an extended adventure, consider having or not having power to mediate the comfort range within your trailer. If you have not spent time in a temperature range outside your comfort zone... a trip can become an experience you will not want to repeat. We have experienced the worse and the best within a week. You can adapt, but be sure you can find some comfort within a comfort range that might not be part of your Boondocking plan...
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Old 08-02-2015, 01:05 PM   #44
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Yep, those full hookups are mighty nice after you've been boondocking awhile, aren't they, Ray?

Nice to rough it, enjoy that, and know you can....so nice to have those creature comforts after awhile, as well.



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Old 08-03-2015, 01:21 PM   #45
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it's only a concept model at this point. Somehow it makes me LIKE pop-ups and "A" frames as alternatives.

-----------------
Dear Bean - Utah, Nevada, etc. "dry heat" does help. 95 degrees and 99% humidity in coastal VA - UGH. To me, boondocking means taking the Honda 1000 generator and a battery charger. Takes very little gas to run the genny - and if you want to cook something you can do it outside with an induction burner running on the genny, or with a propane or chrcoalgrill.

Temperature control: With fantastic fans exhausting and the big SE windows open you can moderate the inside temps a bit (especially if you drape a reflective windshield cover or even a beach towel over the outside of an open window as a cheap instant awning.) It will also cool the Airstream down a lot faster as evening advances. (I do not like the fact that 12 volt outlets are disappearing from newer Airstreams. Can't use the Endless Breeze!)
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Old 08-03-2015, 02:20 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by 48Bob View Post
We have been having a love affair with our 2006 20 foot single axle Safari. We have towed it well over 50k miles, boondocking from coast to coast, up to two months at a time. We find the kitchen layout to be the best of all and there is an abundance of storage. Upgrades we have made include led lights and 16 inch LT tires. Solar will be our next upgrade. We don't hesitate to take it any place that we can get into as long as we don't drag the plumbing. We always travel with extra water jugs in the truck . We also keep an Engle 12 volt refrigerator/freezer in the truck to keep drinks and snacks cold. We feel that the 20 ft Safari (now FC) to be an excellent choice for rockdocking.

We've had our 2011 FC20 less than a year but have already experienced sites with lots of angles and and elevation changes that would have stymied longer units. These are the places we like to go. Full hook up RV spots are used occasionally on longer adventures - a break from resource economizing! - but the 20 gets into those backwoods spots we love!
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Old 08-05-2015, 08:52 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Ray Eklund View Post
The last three weeks in Nevada, we have experienced 37F (6500' elevation) as a low and 110F (2800' elevation) as a high temperature. Although the length of an Airstream will determine the access of your trailer into areas that are not flat, level or graded creating variable angles that can impact your tow vehicle or trailer's rear bumper.

With the low clearances of standard equipment Airstreams, the shorter the trailer the better the access to variable angles of ingress and egress. My experience is with a 23 foot and a 25 foot Airstream. Those with 16 foot to 22 foot might want to give their comments. Our 25 foot is probably the longest Airstream for Boondocking... although permanent NFS campsites are as close to a flat surface campsite one could expect. All it takes is one unimproved wash that creates a problem of dragging your rear bumper or grey/black plumbing to understand the perils of not paying attention to an Airstream's limited clearance. Once you have arrived at your destination, the limits of your trailer become evident immediately. Comfort zone of daily temperature ranges...

Temperatures Off the Grid will limit your seasons and comfort zone. Our experience, keeping in mind the Full Timing individuals, eliminates many areas from the extreme climate areas in the cold and hot spectrum.

Without a source of power during 110F days and 85F evenings, an Airstream will not cool down to the outside temperature of 85F until early in the morning. This is southern Nevada below 3,000 feet elevation.

At 6500 feet elevation near Pioche, Nevada the temperature maximums we experienced were 37F-45F before sunrise and 80F-89F during the daytime. Absolutely wonderful and about three hours northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada.

It is much more difficult to warm up or cool down a longer Airstream. By using the awning, window coverings, vents, opening or closing windows, finding a shady spot among trees (if any trees exist) along the sunrise and sunset exposure, and other Boondocking tricks to maintain a comfortable interior temperature. Like... on hot summer days, align your trailer in an East to West with the awning keeping a shady comfort area for sitting outside while the trailer cools down for the evening. We tend to remain outside until after 10PM while the interior trailer temperatures get closest to a reasonable sleeping range. Later to bed does help sleeping sounder, we have discovered!

As I had posted somewhere on the Forum, we had a 121F day and 111F evening inside our Airstream at Lake Meade, Nevada in June. This was in the shade of tall trees. I slept on a concrete picnic table where the outside temperature did drop into the mid to upper 80'sF. Inside the trailer... 111F.

Winter offers the opposite extremes. Even cold to cool mornings, you want to expose your door side "towards sunrise" for a quick warmup when at elevation, as the temperature can go from 27F to 75F not long after sunrise, leaving the front door open to heat the trailer's interior in the process. Radiant heat on your aluminum can be a curse or a blessing...

When in the desert with low to moderate humidity, we can now sleep with 85F evenings and not be too uncomfortable. Below 80F is optimum, but at lower elevations, not likely. We have seen it all in the months of June and July. Full Timers... you had better be on the move when the seasons change. Depending on your range of camping, a smaller trailer can be an asset! Our 25 foot for our travels is pushing the possibilities of comfort zone of temperature ranges. Now that we have power to run our Dometic air conditioner we can maintain a fairly consistent upper 70F to lower 80F for sleeping... not even considering opening a window, keeping the two ceiling vents open to keep the humidity regulated, but not operating the fans to draw out the cool air. (Provided by the RV campsite full hookups this time!)

Currently it is 90F/28% humidity outside and 79F/18% humidity inside the trailer, the AC set at 77F running consistently. The rear bed area at 83F as the sunrise heats the narrow Eastward facing end of our trailer. Next week we will be heading back to Colorado where our home is at 6300F elevation and the comfort range in the 55F to 90F with low humidity as fairly standard expectations. (Sometimes we wonder why we would leave such a perfect Summer location... with plenty of reason to head south in the Winter!)

When planning an extended adventure, consider having or not having power to mediate the comfort range within your trailer. If you have not spent time in a temperature range outside your comfort zone... a trip can become an experience you will not want to repeat. We have experienced the worse and the best within a week. You can adapt, but be sure you can find some comfort within a comfort range that might not be part of your Boondocking plan...
Boondocking in 110-120 deg F weather should be pretty obvious that it won't be comfortable. Heck, even a well insulated house in that weather is going to run the air-conditioner almost constantly. Not sure why someone would Boondock in some of the hottest areas of the West/South mid summer. Even with full hookups that heat is oppressive.

Chasing 70 degrees is really important, not only for sanity and comfort, but to keep the utility bills down. IMO Boondocking in July I'd be up by the Canadian border etc..

Average July temps:

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