Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-26-2010, 10:47 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Survival Rockdocking- off the GRID

I just had to add to the Boondocking survival thread. Boondocking is not far enough away from the grid, if and ever there is an event that makes our homes no longer safe. Be prepared. Maybe not for the worse, but be prepared for the possibility that your AS trailer could become your permanent home. And a fine one at that!

There are limits that all of us feel we cannot overcome and remain confident that there are others to look up to that prefer to travel with the crowd, like yourself. For survival, you must be able to break out of the conditioning that a city or large community offers to its citizens. Compared to 1910 we all live the lives of the wealthy. Compared to 1940 we live the lives of the wealthy. Most of the third world ARE in survival mode.

Now. Imagine turning off the electricity. Imagine turning off the natural gas. Imagine going for a drink of fresh water... none. No sewage disposal. Imagine going into town and the shelves have already been cleaned out by frantic people preparing for some event heard on the news, be it weather, a natural disaster coming or chaos in the city proper. Give it two weeks. Then another two weeks of a total shut down of all services, utilities and food supplies. No fuel. You look in your wallet and you have $127.00 in cash. Now what? You're screwed. Or are you?

The "developed nations" will be the first to fold up in the first year. The city will be feeding upon itself and the exodus will be OUT of the city. The so called primitive societies and small rural towns are already in position to make the best of the worst possible catastrophe. The natives in Papua New Guinea will not miss a beat. The natives of the Amazon Basin will not miss a beat. They will survive. Why? Because they already are living Survival Rockdocking.

Imagine the worst natural event for mankind. Let us make it a moderate sized iron/nickel asteroid. Crops fail for one season due to the dust reflecting sun light and the natural cooling of the continents. What would you do. What would your plan be to make it through the first year?

Living in a large city: pack the AS and have a destination in mind. Taking a television? Just stay where you are at, as you cannot think outside the box. Know how much fuel you will need to get to your "rural" destination. Fuel is now your most important need. Credit card... do not make me laugh. Cash... maybe, if someone thinks it will have a value. Try your gold necklace, watch or silver ware to get all of your family... out of the urban environment. Now... you are thinking survival.

Relax. I am not some survivalist living in the deep forest of Washington. When I am camped in the back country of the USA, I have thought of what I would need to get by for a couple years, five years, ten... You have to discard what the wonderful things that USE to be urbanized living. Now it will not be able to support itself for very long and the individuals there will become something you can only imagine when one is starving and at a loss of what to do next.

Money. What would become the new currency for Rockdocking survival? Try ammunition. Small caliber for the small change and a 30:06 rifle cartridge for larger value. Shotgun ammunition. Matches. Cigarettes? Nice pair of heavy duty boots. Begin thinking survival in the woods with others who have already thought this out. Matches. Two gallons of fuel. A box of Oat Meal. That paper $20 bill will start a campfire in this environment.

Food. You had better know how to skin a rabbit. Butcher an elk. How do you preserve the meat for the lean times? Are you going to eat carrots and pine nuts, since you are a vegetarian? You would not stand a chance. Think outside the box...

Protection. Calling 911 with the phone to nowhere for protection? Maybe a sign in front of the AS in the back country announcing you have an alarm system? How about your barking dog? Now you are thinking. A 22 rifle beats a stick. A pistol without ammunition is trading material. A rifle for hunting and protection. Do you know how to shoot? Who in the family does know how to bring in game. Carry a hunting knife is a good start.

Think like a native American from the 16th century. Find a place that is secure from weather. Firewood. A source of clean water. Are you at an elevation that supports a garden. Do you know how to take a piece of chert and knock off a flake for the sharpest blade for cutting? Know who else is in the area, as the have nots will be looking for those who have... Be careful who you have in your company that provides nothing for this NEW family unit. The lazy will still remain lazy, expecting YOU and yours to provide. A chemist will have knowledge that a stock broker can not make out of the box adaptations.

I know that this is long and only thought out by random thoughts, but it is the beginning process of making you think. My family has already moved further from the dense urban environment into less dense populated area. People with horses, mules, firearms, shovels, springs in the area. It is the reverse of the depression of going from the farm to Los Angeles. Once that AS is parked, how would YOU set it up to be secure and your HOME? Do you have a place you have camped that fits all of these needs? What does it lack. Give it serious thought.

You cannot imagine how much confidence you will have when YOU HAVE A PLAN FOR THE WORST. If the worst thing to happen to you is you sprain your ankle changing a flat tire, great. But when you have some physical place in the back of your mind, a plan for the worst, you will never be caught in the panic and grid lock. Watch a hurricane replay of New Orleans... This is what you will want to avoid. What have we done for the plan to survive? Simple things become survival tools. Do you think a Solar Panel is only for the... goofy ones with an Airstream? Now it IS practical.

We go Rockdocking whenever we have the free time and love every minute of the peace and quiet that comes with relying upon yourself to survive! And that sums up my plan. What is yours? Or am I, again, the odd ball on the forum reservation? Trust me. My better judgement says... Ray, do not post this thread. But I am always in a survival mode and it would be nice to hear from others, who may someday, have been helped by the advice of fellow campers off of the grid. And I am reaching for the Submit New Threat as I speak...
__________________

__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 04:08 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Argonaut Airstreaming

Three years ago we were camped in an area where a number of 1850's wagon trails converged. The Oregon Trail, The Mormon Trail and the Pony Express ( I believe) in western Wyoming. The grass was tall, the streams were narrow, but deep with trout. This is in an environment that in the Summer looked like a good place to homestead and stay. One winter in the mid-19th century would have changed anyone's mind.

Among a rocky outcrop was found a "tin can". A bit unusual as it was soldered and had three parts. A soldered base, a soldered top with a center that was soldered. What caught my interest was the mode of opening... a knife or some other sharp object to remove one end. Researching tin cans on Google I was led to how food was carried by those crossing the western USA and their food supplies.

For those of you, I could call "Argonaut Airstreamers" rather than Rockdockers, the stories about food, preservation and using local food stuffs was very interesting. The provisions taken on these cross country adventures tested the wits and souls of those travelers. When I hear Boondockers toughing it out at a RV Park just east of Santa Fe, New Mexico on the North side of I-25 (I know, I have spent several days there myself) I am reminded by the true adventurer on wheels... the wagon.

Traveling the back country of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana it is not uncommon to find a "Sheep Herder's Wagon" sitting among a grove of pine, sheep scattered along the tall grassy slopes. Minimal provisions. A reminder that we all could get an education by listening and observing others in the open expanses that still remain in our Western USA.
__________________

__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 05:59 PM   #3
2 Rivet Member
 
2008 19' Bambi
Windcrest , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 36
Images: 1
Really? I'd rather not think about having to rough it off the grid! After a 20 year carreer in the Army, I never want to be uncomfortable again. Just thinking about this topic gives me a headache!
__________________
Silver Dolla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 06:08 PM   #4
Moderator
 
Stefrobrts's Avatar

 
1968 17' Caravel
Battle Ground , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 11,906
Images: 50
Blog Entries: 1
I just want to point out, since I just completed my training as a food safety volunteer with the county extension service, that the USDA and many local extension offices have some great resources for learning to safely can and preserve food. There are some 'survivalist' sites online that have instructions or YouTube videos with very bad, dangerous directions for preserving food. There are some seriously bad bugs that can get into canned goods if you do not preserve them properly, and because of the upsurge in interest in this area, there are some people giving advice who really don't know what they're doing. So be careful and get your info from a trusted site that uses tested recipes and methods - USDA, Ball Blue Book, or University of GA extension are great resources. Stay safe!
__________________
Stephanie




Stefrobrts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2010, 08:46 PM   #5
Chief Chili Cook
 
newroswell's Avatar
 
2010 30' Flying Cloud
Bakersfield , California
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 738
Ray, how would the unique properties of an Airstream help or hinder survival? Would it's shine aluminum exterior encourage someone to intrude that may otherwise not? What other advantages and disadvantages would an Airstream bring?
__________________
newroswell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 12:00 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
blkmagikca's Avatar

 
1987 32' Excella
Nepean , Ontario
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,131
Until some catastrophe strikes, you won't know which direction to escape to, so planning an escape route may not work.

However, I can see that it is necessary to know how to be able to boondock or dry camp. Some preparation here can be done. As you know, the key resources are electric, propane & water. You need propane for your refrigerator, stove and to a minor degree heat (in the event of freezing weather). Water is obvious - you need to have it for drinking, food and for washing (no long showers :-) ) Electricity, specifically 12-volt is critical as well, as it runs the control circuits for your fridge, as well as lights.

Since I do some boondocking, I have a 123-watt solar-electric panel on my roof which ensures that my cabin batteries are charged. In my case, I sleep with a CPAP machine, so it is critical for me to have a relaible source of 12-volts.

To minimize electric consumption, I have changed most of the incandescent bulbs in my rig to LED's. They use only a small fraction of what an incandescent bulb uses, and they have a long reliable life. I bought mine from LEDs 4, Recreational Vehicles

The biggest task is to be able on a long-term basis, get fuel, propane and water.
__________________
VE3JDZ
AIR 12148
1987 Excella 32-foot
1999 Dodge Ram 2500HD Diesel
blkmagikca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 12:09 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Argonaut Airstreaming

Silver Dolla. Thank you for your service. My Dad was a 30 year Army retiree. Twenty some years active duty and the rest teaching ROTC in High School in Independence, Missouri. I had my 1 year, 9 months, 28 days in 1969-1970.

I recall wishing I could sleep for two days without someone yelling at me during Basic Training in Louisiana. I enjoyed the camping. I thought the food was great. My Dad was disappointed that I did not want to stay in the Army and put in my 20 years. The Fun-Travel-and Adventure just did not suit my spirit of adventure...

We all know what rolls down hill after spending some time in the military, don't we!
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 12:18 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Argonaut Airstreaming

Stefrborts- You are correct about modern canning at home today. It is a lost art from the generation that lived through the Depression and 1950's. I remember watching preservatives being made hot, poured into Mason jars and pouring wax on top to seal them. Potatoes in the cellar with onions and the Mason jar fruits.

Not many middle age people recall their grandparents canning preservatives and keeping vegetables in a cellar. The musty smell is not forgotten. The ice blocks cut out of the Flathead Lake (Somers, Montana) for those who did not have an electric refrigerator and delivered to your home. It is all forgotten. Not there will be a return to those days, but if there is a return to home canning, your knowledge will save some food poisoning with canned meats. I remember, in my geology book business, selling one book from the 1840's that concerned itself with medical supplies found in nature. Probably a 1000 page volume.

What pointers do you have to offer? I could use some...
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:11 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
argonaut Airstreaming

newroswell- I do not think there are too many unique features to an Airstream trailer... once parked. The riveted metal skin would give the AS endurance. The sealed bottom. It would be interesting to see what others would find as weakness in the AS for long term living.

I enjoy considering ideas outside the box of modern thinking. I find that Indians adapted to harsh conditions, but the higher elevations of the High Plains would hinder adapting to the available food sources. There is no limit to the ingenuity of pre-1492 American native Indians verbally transferred to their future generations. Our information is passed through written words, today.

We chose the 23 foot AS because of the riveted skin, dual axle and the narrower width for narrow road access. I see many AS's from the past being rebuilt and the skin survives well.

I am sure the US Army will not use bright aluminum in the field. The Pueblo Indians built large structures and being in a "remote" location is just our opinion. They had fuel, water, wild game, favorable climate for growing crops. Once one of those links were lacking, they had to move... Much like Easter Island, once the resources were overwhelmed or consumed by the large population, they were finished and isolated when they squandered their natural resources... and no place to move to.
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:33 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Argonaut Airstreaming

blkmagika- We found the solar panel on our AS as a great addition to our remote camping. Although it is best to have the AS in an open area to get the full benefit, the insulated skin keeps the trailer comfortable. Using the awnings to keep the sides of the AS in the shade makes a big difference.

In a situation where there is no propane available, it would require some planning in a 12 month cycle. Ice cubes would be frivolous. In a worst scenario the microwave is out the door, the refrigerator would eventually be out the door. I do not think the grey and black water tanks could be cleaned enough making them usable for water storage. The roof top air conditioner would be gone. I can think of a lot of standard equipment that would be obsolete in primitive living conditions.

If some people think about what they would do and make an effort to try dry camping for a week, much would be learned. Modern urban household mentality would encumber their existence. It is something that science fiction is written. Last evening I taped a program on the Science Channel about an asteroid impact and need to see how that works out. Much of my initial thoughts was about an asteroid that is coming between our Moon and the Earth on October 20th... 2028 or something like that. That got my attention and if it looks like there could be an impact with the Moon, you will not hear predictions running rampant and scaring the general public. I will be prepared for the worst, and hope for the best.

Thank you for your input. We are not all crazy, just curious.
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:47 PM   #11
Moderator
 
Stefrobrts's Avatar

 
1968 17' Caravel
Battle Ground , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 11,906
Images: 50
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Eklund View Post
Stefrborts- You are correct about modern canning at home today. It is a lost art from the generation that lived through the Depression and 1950's. ...
What pointers do you have to offer? I could use some...
Absolutely. The old methods are not necessarily safe anymore. My grandma sealed her jellies with paraffin, but now the modern 2 piece lids are the preferred methods. Luckily jelly is unlikely to kill you no matter how you seal it, it will probably just go bad and you won't want to eat it.

Some things grandma got away with might have had to do with how the food was handled after it was opened. For example, some people claim their grandma used to do green beans every year in a water bath canner, which is not sufficient to destroy the botulism spores that naturally are present with low-acidity vegetables (they need to be pressure canned). But if she took the beans out and boiled them for 10-20 minutes before eating them, that will destroy the botulism toxin. There was a tragic case where a Dad was in a hurry to go to work and grabbed some beans off the stove before they had boiled long enough. The rest stayed on the stove and boiled before the rest of the family had supper. Dad got botulism and died, but the rest of the family was fine.

Also some recommendations have changed, for example you have to add lemon juice when you can tomato products because modern tomatoes are not as acidic as tomatoes used to be, both because of the kind of tomatoes, and because of changes in the soil. So using up-to-date recipes and methods is the best way to be safe.

The Ball Blue Book is excellent, as is anything from the University of Georgia. They have an excellent book, I think it's called So Easy to Preserve, which is about 2 inches thick and covers almost anything you can think of, including freezing and dehydration. Recently funding was cut to the U of G for their food preservation testing program, which is too bad because more people than ever are interested in growing their own food and preserving it. Not just because they want to be prepared for emergencies, but also because you can control the quality and know what's in it.
__________________
Stephanie




Stefrobrts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 02:22 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
2010 27' FB Classic
N/A , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,717
Ray, I figure that on October 20, 2028 you should be around 77 years old or so. By that time, I doubt if you'll remember where you stored all those canned peaches you put up. :-)
__________________
Bluto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 03:21 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,366
Argonaut Airstreaming

Bluto- You are right about the peaches. My wife and I plan to be camping and watch this near miss in comfort. I remember the canned Flathead Lake cherries more than the peaches, though. I will be 78, but a young 78. Nothing like a little fireworks to make things interesting!

Stephanie- I have a group of older US Department of Agriculture bulletins from the early 1900's to 1950's in my book inventory. I am sure things have changed for many of those over time. Even individual states use to have departments for farms and growers. Thank you for giving up some information that most are not aware. I am not ready to eat crickets and grass hoppers, yet, but can wait to experience those treats as well.

AD- Great private message. I am with you. You obviously know that being prepared like a Boy Scout, beats being a patsy. It will take me some time to ratchet up to Survival Off the Grid, but it would be a smooth transition. I have lived as a kid in western Montana in less than accommodating environments and have been much better off for it! Venison and Canadian Goose would be a good lean to grease diet in meats any time. An Airstream is just my choice of reliable living quarters in the bush, like yourself.
__________________
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2010, 07:38 PM   #14
4 Rivet Member
 
WILDRTEXAS's Avatar
 
1970 27' Overlander
ARLINGTON , TEXAS
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 335
Images: 31
Send a message via Skype™ to WILDRTEXAS
Love this post....very interesting. No sky is falling stuff. THX ALL!
__________________

__________________
He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion...

Taylor 1/20/96 - 11/28/08

WILDRTEXAS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
off the grid onthemove Boondocking 9 09-02-2010 05:36 PM
Winter Living off grid in Vermont with woodstove cmell Winter Living 59 10-28-2009 05:02 PM
Seeking To Go Off The Grid! privacy2 Member Introductions 4 07-11-2006 07:31 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.