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Old 11-08-2011, 02:24 PM   #57
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I mean't to ask y'all about that, being a newbie my own self and all.

Does the rank and file tend to go toward lawful handguns, with the attendent documentation, licensing, etc, or do you tend to go the easier, harder to trace sawed off 12 ga. route? ( I mean LEGALLY sawn off, of course. I know the rules!) I mean, I love a nice Glock 27 in .40 Smith for being handy to keep in a jacket but theres just something about that 'shaaaKLICKett" sound of racking a shell into a Mossberg thats it's own sweet music. And universally recognized.
Carrying firearms has a history of divisiveness here. However there seems to be a wealth of information available also. I would either find one of the old threads to post to or start your own. However, I would suggest that you start off by saying that your only interest is in gathering ideas on what to carry not debating whether to or not. Just my advice.

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Old 11-08-2011, 02:49 PM   #58
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Here's a rule that mentions firearms, Gringo:

"Discussions about politics, weaponry and religion are permitted only in association with the topic of this forum and will be closed or removed if they become disruptive."


History on Airforums shows us that gun discussions invariably turn into flame wars.
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:09 PM   #59
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I do believe that Ken has struck the proverbial nail right on the head with his words on the origin of "Boondocks". When serving in Vietnam we shortened it to the Boonies. The Army jungle had was simply called a boonie hat in fact. I think it still survives today with that name attached. For those of us serving in Vietnam there were two places. The Boonies ( where we were) and the World ( where we wanted to be).
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Old 11-08-2011, 04:09 PM   #60
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boonlodging

How about boonlodging. We're not "docked"to anything when 'boondocking" wolf146
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Old 11-08-2011, 05:12 PM   #61
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So would a rally under those conditions be a boondoggle?
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Old 11-08-2011, 05:17 PM   #62
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So would a rally under those conditions be a boondoggle?

Boondoggle (project), term for a scheme that wastes time and money.

I think 99% percent of camping fits that, but then that's the whole idea isn't it?

If you get anything constructive accomplished, then it is work.

Ken
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Old 11-08-2011, 05:30 PM   #63
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So, would a pointer born on such a Boondoggle be a Boondoggie?

Would you name it Spaniel Boone?
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:45 AM   #64
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I forgot about the hellish temps Gringo usually lives in. We've lived in the mountain boonies for so long, 90˚ feels like death to us. After several weeks at 7,300', Gringo may start to become acclimated to Colorado temps and wish for A/C. Several years ago we went to a baseball game in Phoenix at the enclosed, air conditioned ball park. The temp felt like the 80's and people were wearing sweaters. It was 108˚ outside. When we travel to places like Fla., we wilt fast with the temps and humidity, but start to get a little used to it after several days, but crave cold. Next summer we'll find out if Gringo starts to become a Coloradan after a while.

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Old 11-10-2011, 10:21 AM   #65
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I think you might be right. After experiencing life at 7300 ft. for a few days, I definitely felt the difference. No doubt about it, it affects me. Breathing and light headedness, mostly. I did notice a tendency to headaches which for me is also a sign of dehydration. As noted, the max temperatures are routine for us. It's 84 here right now. All the windows are open. Nice breeze blowing through. Blue water. White puffy clouds.

Its the O2 starvation and evaporation at altitude that has my attention. I assume the UV is also relatively fierce for that latitude, but again, we have a lot more of that here year round, relatively speaking. I fight UV on a daily basis. I have wondered what it's like for someone who is acclimated to the altitude when they go back to sea level. Is there this excess oxygen to their systems for a few weeks?

But if that were the case, you mountain guys would be vacationing here every year for the rush, and NObody would ever beat the Broncos....anywhere.
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:02 PM   #66
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........................................


I have wondered what it's like for someone who is acclimated to the altitude when they go back to sea level. Is there this excess oxygen to their systems for a few weeks?

But if that were the case, you mountain guys would be vacationing here every year for the rush, and NObody would ever beat the Broncos....anywhere.
I have always been physically active. (Hiking and biking etc.)

When I first moved here from Seattle, I did not notice the difference at all until I got above about 11,000' while hiking. After nearly 20 years here, if I am at the top of Mt Evans or Pike's Peak, I can feel it a bit if I do something strenuous , but not enough to stop me from doing anything I feel like (although maybe slower). However, I ride my bike at least 50 miles a week so I'm sure that helps. When I go back to Seattle or visit my son in San Diego, I don't feel any different, but I can certainly walk up the Seattle downtown hills with no problem.

I'm not a physiologist, but I think your body just adjusts your breathing rate to take in as much as it needs at the time. If you are in a more oxygen rich environment, you just breath slower. I do know that you can pass out from too much oxygen, and that hasn't happen yet. I also know that the less oxygen available, the more red blood cells the body will produce. The number of red blood cells in your blood will slowly go back down over time at sea level. So you will arrive at sea level initially with the ability to use more oxygen, but unless you panic and hyperventilate, you will automatically breath at the rate that provides the amount of oxygen you need.

By the way, I am sure smoking greatly reduces one's ability to deal with the higher altitude, but you still see plenty of people puffing away even up in the mountains.

Ken
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:15 PM   #67
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Yeah, I noticed that in Boulder, now that you mention it. A whole bunch of people smoking and eating a lot of Cheetos and laughing.

They seemed to be dealing with the higher altitude all right. Guess those college age folks acclimate faster...
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:21 PM   #68
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Yeah, I noticed that in Boulder, now that you mention it. A whole bunch of people smoking and eating a lot of Cheetos and laughing.

They seemed to be dealing with the higher altitude all right. Guess those college age folks acclimate faster...
I understand that;
"if you are higher than the altitude, then the altitude will not affect you."
It is one of the basic rules of Baropotonamics.

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Old 11-10-2011, 05:33 PM   #69
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Going down to sea level we have found we can walk further and faster. This is why athletes train at high altitude. We have more blood so we can accept and retain more oxygen. This is why some athletes get transfusions—blood packing—which is not legal, so they train here if they don't want to break the rules. This makes us more tasty to vampires as well, so most Colorodans wear garlic around our necks.

It takes men a few days to acclimate and women more time because they don't make more red blood cells as fast. Some people acclimate very fast, other don't. It is party genetic, but a physically fit person will probably do better. Age makes a difference too. Gringo experienced a mild version of altitude sickness—shortness of breath, sleepiness and headaches are not uncommon. I once saw an older man pass out on top of Mount Evans (14,000+ feet). That was a long time ago, so I am probably older than he was then. The solution to that is to rebreath into a glove or paper back until you recover. People who fly in don't get as much a chance to acclimate as someone who drives here and has more time as the road gets higher and higher. People who fly to ski resorts and go skiing right away, may sleep all day the next day.

Every fall I try to go outside with lighter clothing than may seem necessary. This gives my body a chance to adjust to cold. People in cold climates, I read somewhere, have more capillaries and their skin is warmer, so I try to give my capillaries a chance to grow. It hasn't worked for my feet and they will next be warm in June.

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Old 11-10-2011, 06:12 PM   #70
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............................

I once saw an older man pass out on top of Mount Evans (14,000+ feet). That was a long time ago, so I am probably older than he was then. The solution to that is to rebreath into a glove or paper back until you recover.
.................................
Gene
Hi Gene,

I don't want to be picky, be this is fairly important concept, so I will.

If a person is suffering from exertion or lack of oxygen at a high altitude, breathing in a bag is the opposite of what needs to be done. The best possible thing would be supplemental oxygen combined with an expeditious descent to lower altitude.

Breathing in a bag is the treatment for someone who has hyperventilated (over oxygenated) usually due to anxiety. Breathing into a bag causes one to re-breath the air they just expelled, thus each breath contains less oxygen. They will soon return to a normal level. There is another way to treat it. If it is caused by anxiety, they will eventually pass out. At that time their brain will cause them to return to an appropriate respiration rate and they will wake up.

Here's a good bit on altitude sickness.

Altitude sickness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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