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Old 11-12-2013, 10:11 PM   #15
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Perry
That, my friend, is asphalt. You are looking through my floor rot (which you correctly guessed about) to the earth below. It's kind of an illusion.
I believe I may be crossing threads, but how did you put your drains in the channel? And, speaking of the channel, since there is corrosion on it is it no good anymore? I am still wondering if there is a chemical treatment and corrosion cleanup method.
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:24 PM   #16
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Rippie,

I considered putting a patch on instead of replacing the whole panel, too, but after gaining some confidence with panel replacement, it seemed like no big deal. Anyway, you can do this--its probably better than just adding rivets to the already corroded and brittle bottom edge of the original lower panel.

BUT, if you use a patch, the best way to do it is still going to be to do it with bucked rivets, meaning buying all the same tools. One critical thing, whether patching, or replacing the entire panel, is seal up the steel angle so that you don't get the galvanic corrosion between the angle and the skin.

Keep in mind it isn't really about making it perfect, (or to factory spec), but make your repair worth your time so that you don't find yourself going back into it again a year from now. In this case, the materials are cheap, the tools are more pricey, your time is whatever you can afford to put into it, but materials+tools+time=an investment in future time/grief savings.

good luck!
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Old 11-12-2013, 11:14 PM   #17
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seal the angle? por 15, I suppose?
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Old 11-13-2013, 07:05 AM   #18
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POR 15 will work to seal the angle. You could also make a new hold down plate out of stainless steel. It needs to be painted with something if it is made of something other than aluminum. Making it out of aluminum may have issues as well from a strength standpoint.

The channel can be used over even if it is corroded as long as it is superficial. This means no holes or cracks as a result of corrosion. To put drains in I used some stainless steel tubing with a flare on one end. You drill a hole so the tube fits through the channel and floor. Then you seal the flared end with something like parbond. You then seal any place water can get out of the channel so the water goes down the drain and not into your floor. The tube will drain water into the belly pan where it can get out and not rot the floor. I guess you could put rubber hoses on the ends of the tubes if you wanted to funnel it outside the belly pan. There are breaks in the channel where the curved sections meet the straight walls. I bridged this gap with a small U-shaped piece of aluminum. Seal all screw and bolt heads. I believe I coated the C-channel with POR15 in the back where there was lots of corrosion.

Here are some photos of what I did. I added extra supports for a 3 section rear floor. If you replace that rear panel, you can put in a single section floor and then rivet on the hold down plate.

Here is that bridge between the straight and curved channels and then some of the drains and rear end repair. I did not put drains in the rear but I did in the front. I was in a hurry on the rear and I did not get time to put drains in there.









Perry
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Old 11-13-2013, 07:46 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by rippie View Post
And, speaking of the channel, since there is corrosion on it is it no good anymore? I am still wondering if there is a chemical treatment and corrosion cleanup method.
There is really no chemical way of removing corrosion. The best way in my opinion is to bead blast it off with a fine media. Once the corrosion is removed, then make the determination as to replacing or repairing. If the "C" channel is beyond repair then just replace the corroded portion.

Even thought it may not look like it, replacing the panel is going to be easier and faster then trying to splice in a new piece on this particular panel. Same with the floorboard take it out up to the splice, you are most likely going to buy a full sheet anyhow.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:05 AM   #20
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Aerowood how do you feel about POR15?

Perry
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:26 AM   #21
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I think it is great for steel. I used it on my frame, sprayed it on with a cheap Harbor Freight touch up gun then just through the gun away. Not so sure it would work right with aluminum. Aluminum and Steel corrosion are quite a bit different and thus need to be treated differently.
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Old 11-13-2013, 10:02 AM   #22
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S0 is there any kind of sealant for aluminum corrosion like POR for steel? And any thoughts on rubberized or underbody coatings, any recommended applications for this type of product anywhere?
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Old 11-13-2013, 10:25 AM   #23
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I used the stuff on aluminum but don't have any long term data. I have also used this aluminized polyurathane paint. I put some of this on my side wraps just to see how long it would stay there on unprepped aluminum and it is stuck on there and shows no signs of pealing. It is similar to POR15 in that is uses a moisture cured polyurathane. There is an article below where a guy painted an old aluminum boat with good results.

ALUMINUM PAINT - Aluthane - MCU coating INFO PAGE


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Old 11-13-2013, 10:31 AM   #24
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Rippie,
Aluminum is ment to breath, it's way more porous than steel. Por works on steel because it works chemically with the rust to form a bond. The reason for Alclad is that pure aluminum exterior oxidizes (like copper turning green) and once that happens the metal is protected. Non Alclad aluminum can be pretreated, example anodised, like brand new Airstream's outer skin. Your problem is that water has been trapped for long periods of time and the Aluminum has been rooted through. Once that happens nothing can be put on it to prevent further oxidation except to get rid of it, meaning get to raw Aluminum; However you have none left. I also think that the rub rail that trapped the water on the outer skin is in part a design flaw and the way water can pool up on the inside c channel with steel in the middle makes the problem grow faster.

That is why I do not put on the rub rail and use another method as you can see in the picture.
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Old 11-13-2013, 11:26 AM   #25
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How do you deal with the haphazard holes under the bumper trim without replacing the bottom panels all the way around the trailer?

Perry

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Rippie,
Aluminum is ment to breath, it's way more porous than steel. Por works on steel because it works chemically with the rust to form a bond. The reason for Alclad is that pure aluminum exterior oxidizes (like copper turning green) and once that happens the metal is protected. Non Alclad aluminum can be pretreated, example anodised, like brand new Airstream's outer skin. Your problem is that water has been trapped for long periods of time and the Aluminum has been rooted through. Once that happens nothing can be put on it to prevent further oxidation except to get rid of it, meaning get to raw Aluminum; However you have none left. I also think that the rub rail that trapped the water on the outer skin is in part a design flaw and the way water can pool up on the inside c channel with steel in the middle makes the problem grow faster.

That is why I do not put on the rub rail and use another method as you can see in the picture.
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