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Old 03-23-2014, 02:04 PM   #15
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The best way to remove solid rivets is to drill into the head, leaving the head still in place, then use a 1/8" punch and small 8 to 12 oz hammer with a switch tap to punch the body of the solid rivet out. The other techniques that are other mentioned such as using a wood chisel will elongate existing holes and/ or damage the skin.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:05 PM   #16
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Aluminum pop rivets with a steel center [also called nail or mandrill] may show rust stains through the paint months after the renovation is complete. They are also less likely to "break clean" when installing. If in doubt try a magnet on your pop rivets. The only way to remove bucked or pop rivets without damaging the surrounding metal is to drill them out with the proper drill bit.
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:50 AM   #17
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Thank you William and Putback,

I've already tried to remove a solid rivet and... very difficult ! I use a good drill...

For pop rivet, they come out very very easily at the moment.

I have a little other question about solid rivets... :

If the hope shape is too large, nevertheless the solid rivet can fix correctly because there is a good pressure between the 2 shapes when the rivet is in place ?
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Old 03-24-2014, 08:48 AM   #18
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This midday, I was returned to see the Airstream and you have reason, all panels assembled with solid rivets come in one piece, I've had only drill around the door to remove a great piece of panels !

I found a good technique to remove solid rivet, I've used a 1/8" drill and at the beginning, I didn't put much strong effort and then, when the drill begin to enter into the rivet, I push the drill to remove it clearly, the hole looks well

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Old 03-24-2014, 09:11 AM   #19
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Enlarged rivet holes

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaŽl View Post
Thank you William and Putback,

I've already tried to remove a solid rivet and... very difficult ! I use a good drill...

For pop rivet, they come out very very easily at the moment.

I have a little other question about solid rivets... :

If the hope shape is too large, nevertheless the solid rivet can fix correctly because there is a good pressure between the 2 shapes when the rivet is in place ?
Solid rivets will fill a hole that is only slightly enlarged when the old rivet is drilled out. If the hole is much enlarged, then drill it out and use the next larger size of rivet.

Drilling solid rivets requires a little practice, but is not really difficult. Try to keep the drill centered in the rivet head, and drill only through the head. The shaft of the rivet in the hole can be driven out with a punch, and the hole will remain the correct size.

Be careful not to use too much force on the punch, because the inner piece of aluminum can bend. Too much gap between the sheets of aluminum is a worse problem than an enlarged hole.

Do you have any friends who work on aircraft sheet metal?
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Old 03-24-2014, 09:24 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by GaŽl View Post
HiHoAgRV : It seems there are in aluminium, but if they are in steel, what is the problem, it more difficult to remove, is it ?...

Thank you !
When removing a steel shanked pop riet, the drill will usually impact the steel then jump off center into the soft rivet creating a goofy hole with a messed up rivet still inside.

If you CAN keep the drill centered, the drill will grab the steel and start the rivet turning in the hole.

Either way, it's difficult to remove with a chisel because of the steel shank.

Remember, someone else will eventually own the Airstream and they will thank you for not using steel pop rivets!
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Old 03-24-2014, 09:52 AM   #21
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Of course, when I say much strong effort, I do attention not to be forced too much in order to not deform sheet or enlarge the hole.

It's new for me and I try to do no mistake.

For sure, I will do mistakes but I hope they'll are not very important.

Pop rivets are removed very easily without effort so I think that's aluminium pop rivet

And no... I don't know anyone to help me in France... for sure people knows this aircraft structure... but at the moment no... you are only my friends

I haven't many job to do with shapes and rivets, only to remove interior panels and around the Airstream to separate body from chassis. The body is a good condirtion

Thank you !
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Old 03-24-2014, 07:53 PM   #22
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A few tips you may find useful. Drill bits are inexpensive, buy quality bits in bulk, they usually come in packs of 10 or more. When you suspect one is dull throw it away. A dull bit can "walk off center" especially with solid rivets. With a dull bit we tend to apply to much force to the drill. The result can be when the bit goes through the rivet it continues through the outer skin before you can react to stop it. Occasionally you drill a solid rivet so perfectly a thin wall remains around the shank and you can not get it out. Resist the urge to "wiggle the drill". Place a small, thin, sharp putty knife between the rivet head and panel and tap it with a hammer. That will shear off the head. You will have "spinners", that is when a rivet is so loose the bit spins it instead of drilling it. Use the putty knife between the rivet head and body panel to create enough resistance to hold the rivet to allow drilling. If that fails use the putty knife and hammer to shear it off. Once you really get into it you will find your drill bit stacks up with rivet heads very quickly. To remove them from the bit hold the stack with the teeth of common pliers, spin the drill while gently pulling with pliers. They come off easy. You may want to leave a "short stack" of heads on the bit, they can act as a drill stop just to be safe. If you have a variable speed drill try it a slower speed most people find it preforms better. That's a few common issues I'm sure you will find more. we all do.
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Old 03-25-2014, 09:16 AM   #23
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Yes, I agree, when I use slow speed to drill, I have better results !

I've tried to use a center punches to guide the drill but it isn't good :





This midday, I've removed all interior panels without difficulty except one thing... I forgot to remove an electrical plug... ! Not very easy with one arm to unscrew this plug as well it was the bigger panel ! Not heavy but very long... !

A few head rivets were fixed still on panel and a little punch on the hammer where I've placed this part (I don't know the word) between the hammer and the rivet :



And perfect result
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:58 AM   #24
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GaŽl, the article I sent you should be very helpful.

For drilling out both buck rivets and blind rivets, I recommend this tool. It is used by many professional shops and they find it a big time saver....especially for the bucks.
Rivet Removal Tool

For drilling out buck rivets without the tool, I recommend using 135ļ split point bits because they center better. Split Point Drill Bits

We also sell a nice spring punch for bucks if you prefer it for starts. This tool puts a pin prick on the center of the rivet head and then you use a standard drill to finish.
Split Point Drill Bits

Sizing a buck rivet hole, as mentioned earlier, is very important. Do not oval at all if you can help it. If you drill out the 1/8" buck with a #29 or #30 bit, you can then decide whether you need to go up to the #21 and use 5/32" replacement rivets. Remember that 1/8" braziers and 5/32" modified braziers have the same head size....just different shafts.
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Old 03-25-2014, 04:49 PM   #25
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My English is not very good thus I do not understand everything while it is maybe simple sentences, I try to make in best but I believe that I look complicated.
But for English, it must be very easy to understand !

I purshase the reading and I need to read several times !

I admit not understand very well the "brazier" because if I do an hole in 1/8", I have to put rivet of 5/32" ? isn't it ?

Many thanks for the article and I think it can help me too and I'll fix nex rivets !

So, soon I'll have to make an order in your store.
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Old 03-26-2014, 01:44 AM   #26
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I'm stupid...

The brazier take place on the head of the rivet gun in order to fix new rivet...



Have a nice day everybody
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:10 AM   #27
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Before :



After :



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Old 03-26-2014, 06:40 AM   #28
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Brazier

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaŽl View Post
My English is not very good thus I do not understand everything while it is maybe simple sentences, I try to make in best but I believe that I look complicated.
But for English, it must be very easy to understand !

I purshase the reading and I need to read several times !

I admit not understand very well the "brazier" because if I do an hole in 1/8", I have to put rivet of 5/32" ? isn't it ?

Many thanks for the article and I think it can help me too and I'll fix nex rivets !

So, soon I'll have to make an order in your store.
Your English is much better than my French, so I'll have to stick with my native language, but I admire you for what you are doing.

Brazier is simply one style of rivet head, among many that are manufactured. There are round head rivets, flat-head countersunk rivets, and probably many more. Brazier is just a shape for the rivet head that shows on the outside of the metal.

The rivet gun drives a tool we call a rivet set. Here is where the English is confusing. This is a tool used to drive in, or "set" a rivet. Don't confuse the name of the tool with our use of the word set to mean a group of related objects.

Each style and each size of rivet head needs its own special style of rivet set tool, so that the tool does not damage the head of the rivet. Rivet guns are made so that changing the rivet set is quick and easy.

The rivet shank must be nearly the same size as the hole in the metal, or it will bend when it is driven and will be weak. Therefore, when the hole gets enlarged, we must drill the hole out to the next larger size and use the larger size rivet.

They do make special rivets that have the larger size shank and the smaller head. These can be used on an Airstream so that all rivets appear to be the same size. They cannot be used on aircraft, so the FAA documents I referred you to probably will not mention these.

Keep trying and maybe one of us will find words to explain all of this to you. Unfortunately, my study of your beautiful language was long ago and did not include technical words like "rivet."

Bonne chance!
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