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Old 08-26-2016, 09:11 PM   #1
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How to repair this?

I have a '71 Streamline Princess. Need to fix this hole on the underside. I've watched videos and read through posts but would love to hear some advice on how I should approach this one specifically. Primarily, what material would be best to use and how do I work with the surface not being flat. I appreciate the help.

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Old 08-26-2016, 10:43 PM   #2
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I would get a roll of aluminum flashing at the hardware store and cut a patch. I would run a bead of sealant around the edges and slide it under the trim, then start riveting down alternating from side to side. Afterwards, I would rattle can paint the area.
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Old 08-26-2016, 11:10 PM   #3
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A rectangular patch and pop rivets!
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Old 08-27-2016, 05:09 AM   #4
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You have to answer yourself some questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyrr77 View Post
I have a '71 Streamline Princess. Need to fix this hole on the underside. I've watched videos and read through posts but would love to hear some advice on how I should approach this one specifically. Primarily, what material would be best to use and how do I work with the surface not being flat. I appreciate the help.

First you have to answer yourself a question, how good are you at fixin' stuff. If you are pretty good then this should be a relatively easy fix. If you aren't so good then the best way to do it is patch it with a piece of 5x series aluminum pop riveted or sheet metal screwed to the existing piece with some sealer applied.

The RIGHT way, is to drill out the rivets holding the piece in there. Order a piece of 5x series .032 aluminum that is big enough to fit. Take the old piece and flatten it out. Once you remove the old piece it will try to flatten out some. Use this flattened out piece as a template to cut out your new piece. Now using a short piece (foot or so) of 4" PVC roll your curve trying to match the other side. Some of this match can be done when installing. Reinstall using pop rivets and plenty of sealant on front end around channel iron and under trim molding when going back together.

Good luck
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Old 08-27-2016, 07:56 AM   #5
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My question. Why is the whole sheet hanging so low in the middle. Shouldn't it be riveted to the cross members?
I would make a patch but no seal it. There must be a way for any water accumulation to exit the space.
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Old 08-27-2016, 11:37 AM   #6
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I believe that piece is one that was preformed in a press or other device. It has a compound curve. Leave it in there! Drill out the rivets in the goldish trim above. Cut a piece of aluminum (.032 is good. A little thicker might be ok) that will reach left to right from the seam to the right of the tear to an inch or two to the left of it. Cut it long enough, top to bottom, to reach from beneath the goldish trim to well onto the horizontal area underneath, covering all of the tear. Seal it at the top and on the sides with appropriate sealer. Leave the underneath seam unsealed if you like, although I'm guessing there are plenty of spots for water to exit already. Seal it all around if you like. Rivet in in place , top seam first (under trim) then down sides, one rivet at a time on each side as you go, and finally underneath. It will replace the current seam on the right, hide under the gold trim, and add a seam on the left, which will look fine after you paint the whole thing. The good part is that you don't have to reform that curve. I guarantee this will be less noticeable than messing with that double curve and most folks realize that all trailers of this age have had a similar minor repair. This is a minor repair and will look great. Take your time. I'm hoping that the tear doesn't get all the way to the front curve. I can't tell from the photo. Good luck.
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Old 08-27-2016, 08:11 PM   #7
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Thank you all for the feedback. It sounds like there is some flexibility in the approach. I can search the forum but if anyone is still following this, I have a couple questions. There was mention of water needing to drain; how does water get up there? Secondly, I live in Kansas City, are there local sources for aluminum in larger cities or is online better? Any suggestions on where to shop? Again, thank you all.
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Old 08-27-2016, 09:00 PM   #8
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I would go to an industrial insulation supplier, the type who supplies to pipelines and refining plants. They will have rolls of the type of flat stock insulation jacketing that would fit the bill. If they will only sell you a full roll, ask for the name of a local contractor who buys from them. Some kind sole is sure to help out. If you get stuck, they do have small sheets at Lowes, but it's not the cheaper option. Also be sure you use aluminum x aluminum rivets. Aluminum x steel means the center pin (or mandrill) is made of steel, which is a bad combination for outdoor use. The two "dis-simillar metals will cause a galvanic reaction, which left unchecked becomes oxidation (aluminum rust) to the detriment of all your hard work.
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Old 08-28-2016, 02:06 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyrr77 View Post
Thank you all for the feedback. It sounds like there is some flexibility in the approach. I can search the forum but if anyone is still following this, I have a couple questions. There was mention of water needing to drain; how does water get up there? Secondly, I live in Kansas City, are there local sources for aluminum in larger cities or is online better? Any suggestions on where to shop? Again, thank you all.
If you are getting water under your belly pan you have a problem. Something is not sealed properly. The space between belly pan and floor is intended to remain dry.

One place to order sheet aluminum manufactured for AS is Airparts INC. There you can find 5052H32 for use ad belly pan in AS

When attatching remember to use big headed 5/32 rivets or washers ( aluminum) or SS sheet metal screws and seal it up
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:34 AM   #10
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I'd tow it to Jackon Center and let the pros at the factory do it.
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Old 08-28-2016, 02:05 PM   #11
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It's not an A$.
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