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Old 09-16-2008, 09:58 AM   #15
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The key to the spray is fine overlapping strands of the glue. You want to create a web one both surfaces. Do not try to cover the surface as if you painting it on. It needs to dry 100% before you stick them together. That might be 1 minute it might be 10 all depends on the humidity. You can test by using the back of you hand... gently press your hand into the glue, if your hair sticks, wait. Do not rush the glue, for if it is not dry enough it will come apart later. Once the surfaces touch, that is it, so be lined up. A file will cut off the excess around the edge. Make sure to roll out the surface with a j bar roller. You can also wait too long and all the solvent will evaporate out of the glue and the bond will not take place.
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Old 09-16-2008, 12:53 PM   #16
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I have yet to find a 3M product that has not worked well. Thier glues work great! choose your stickyness and go for it.

We use thier glues for interiors.
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Old 09-18-2008, 09:47 AM   #17
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Ok, well, the model-shop raid was a success!!

(turns out, we buy super-77 by the case. there was a half-can of "90" left; the model shop guys told me that they prefer the 77, but anyway...)

So, it seems to have worked nicely. It didn't soak in at all; just worked exactly as advertised.

So now I need to cut down one of the finished doors by a couple of inches. I'm thinking a jig saw with a fine-toothed blade would be the thing...masking tape on the laminate side, to deter any chipping. sound good?
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Old 09-18-2008, 10:48 AM   #18
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So now I need to cut down one of the finished doors by a couple of inches. I'm thinking a jig saw with a fine-toothed blade would be the thing...masking tape on the laminate side, to deter any chipping. sound good?
Use masking tape, but cut with the door upside-down. Remember that most jigsaw blades cut on the pull stroke and tend to splinter on top. You can however buy "push" stroke blades.
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Old 09-18-2008, 10:51 AM   #19
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Chuck,
On review, if you have access to a table saw or a circular saw you may get better results with a smoother/straighter cut.
If you wind up using a circular or jig saw, clamp a guide to the door so you can keep the saw on the mark.
Good luck.
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Old 09-18-2008, 11:50 AM   #20
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no table saw. I do have a circular saw, and I was thinking of that + a plywood blade (fine-tooth). I'd have to cut it upside-down, though...might have to with either saw, as the width of the base plates is probably wider than the distance between the cut and the protruding metal handle of the door.

and yep, I have a clamp-on straight edge, just for such purposes.
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Old 09-18-2008, 12:34 PM   #21
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Jig saw may leave less ragged edge, unless you have a fine tooth blade in that saw....
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Old 01-09-2009, 09:55 AM   #22
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Chuck,

I have had a few jig saws in my time as a home remodeler and carpenter. I like using the Bosch jog saw more than any other that I have tried.

Matter of fact, I was home visiting Maw & Paw early last year, and had to do some work on their house. I pulled the Bosch out of the truck and cut a couple items for the new kitchen. (Contractor that they hired was a bit slow getting things done, and I just had to help out for a couple days.) I let Paw use the saw, and he instantly fell in love with it.

Paw wouldn't let me take the saw with me when I left, and it wasn't until Christmas that I was able to get my saw back. (Maw bought him one just like mine for a Christmas gift.)

I would use the jig saw, make sure you support the parts well. Possibly sandwich them in between two scrap boards. A slow feed-rate will be absolutely necessary. Use the finest toothed blade you can find.

Good luck,

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Old 01-09-2009, 10:11 AM   #23
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Use masking tape, but cut with the door upside-down. Remember that most jigsaw blades cut on the pull stroke and tend to splinter on top. You can however buy "push" stroke blades.
Also, cut the material, SLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWLY, and the material will reward you.

Andy
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Old 01-09-2009, 10:33 AM   #24
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well, I used the jig saw and it didn't work out too well. had a couple of chip-outs...not a total disaster, as the damaged areas are hidden by the p-scrolls once installed. but next time, (I do have one more door to do), I'll use the rotozip.
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Old 01-09-2009, 01:21 PM   #25
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well, I used the jig saw and it didn't work out too well. had a couple of chip-outs...not a total disaster, as the damaged areas are hidden by the p-scrolls once installed. but next time, (I do have one more door to do), I'll use the rotozip.
Try using a metal cutting blade instead of a wood one. Also cut with the finished side of the tambour nest to the saw, but you probably already figured that one out.
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Old 01-09-2009, 02:37 PM   #26
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A common problem with solvent based contact adhesives is humidity. The solvent evaporation causes moisture to form on the surfaces, and then they will not stick until the moisture has evaporated also.
The 3m-90 is a good all-around spray adhesive for permanent bonds. 3m-77 is not as strong, but it will allow you to re-position the two pieces if you need to.
If you ever see a can of brush-on green contact cement at a yardsale with the name "grip", BUY IT! It's the best stuff ever made for permanent bonds, and is no longer made due to the solvent content.
Good luck, Rich
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Old 01-09-2009, 07:13 PM   #27
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Tricks an old timer taught me

1) When cutting, Put down a pieces of masking tape on e cut line. Then remark the cut on the tape. This minimizes the "tear out" caused by the saw blade.
2) When making countertops, the contact cement will soak into the MDF (medium density fiberboard). Put 1st coat on the porous material only. Put the 2nd coat on porous material at same time that you coat the nonporous material. This way they are both tacky (dry to touch) at the same time.
3) If I have a countertop job coming up, I'll look through the curbside piles on trash night for an old venietian blind. The cheap plastic ones work best. Lay them down on the MDF board ( or your favorite porous material) about 1 " apart. Then you can place the formica (or your other material to be bonded) on top. You can the position it where it needs to be. It slides on the blinds. Once it's in place, you slowly pull out the blinds 1 at a time. Then roll out on top with a J-roller. This secures the bond. Remember you only get 1 chance if using quality contact cement. Make sure of the fit by putting items together 1st without cement. If possible oversize the material & trim later.
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Old 01-10-2009, 07:57 AM   #28
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a jig saw cuts on the up stroke... that causes chip out. Cut with the saw on the underside of the piece and it will not chip out. Also make sure the blade swing is set on zero.
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