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Old 03-17-2010, 01:04 PM   #29
Restorations done right
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my vote is cork. Very forgiving and comfortable under foot.
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:53 PM   #30
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Back to flooring, I can see the advantages of putting down flooring ahead of the cabinets to get a crisp transition. So, it comes back to a question of what type. Is cork the best solution? Marmoleum? High end sheet vinyl?
There are plenty of great options, so for me it came down to cost and aesthetics. VAT was good enough for Airstream, so its cousin VCT was good enough for me. It's inexpensive, durable, easy to lay in a DIY application, and there are hundreds of patterns, from those reminiscent of vintage tiles, to those that are modern and brand new.

With unlimited budget I probably would have gone with sheet linoleum (true linoleum, not sheet vinyl that many people refer to generically as linoleum). But for me, it was simply much too expensive. VCT in a pattern that reminded me of some of my favorite Marmoleum patterns is what I used, and it met my criteria for low cost, pleaseing aesthetics, and easy DIY-ability.

-Marcus
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:58 PM   #31
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I would and will go with Bamboo. For floor and wall. Though Bamboo Ply is quite expensive... but I have time since I haven't take delivery of the Over 63


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Old 03-17-2010, 04:56 PM   #32
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Frank. What are you using to glue and press the veneer.
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Old 03-17-2010, 05:58 PM   #33
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Paul I use a high solids contact cement. I think the brand name is Bond Rite. I buy it from my plywood dealer by the case. The 3M 90 at the box store works very well too. Ideally is to use a vacuum bag and yellow glue but I have not splurged on that technology even after all these years.

I might want to say that IF one copies the original wood work, one can just use 1/4" plywood to do everything.
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:54 PM   #34
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Veneering with spray contact cement is not as reliable as it used to be. A lot of new contact cement doesn't hold up to extreme high temperatures like the old toxic stuff. We still use it for countertops with formica-type laminates, and for laminate cabinet refacing. For woodwork in an Airstream I would stay away from it. Yellow glue is more bulletproof but requires a press or vacuum table/bag to clamp it against the substrate. You can make your own very inexpensively if you have a compressor already.
Obviously there are a lot of people using spray contact adhesives with success, but I learned not to trust it after a couple of EXPENSIVE failures. One cause of these failures is condensation. When you apply spray contact in a cold or humid environment the evaporation causes water to condense onto the surface of the glue. If you don't wait until it evaporates this layer of water keeps the contact from adhering to itself. I use a heat gun to force-dry it or space heater to warm the space I'm working in if possible.
I also read early in this thread that cherry is a bad choice for Airstream woodwork. Cherry is THE traditional American furniture hardwood. There are a lot of 200+ year old pieces that look absolutely fantastic! The patina that develops on cherrywood is a look that is almost impossible to duplicate.
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Old 03-18-2010, 05:43 AM   #35
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I 100% agree about Cherry. It is my favorite wood both aesthetically and to work. I think it ages very gracefully. The only thing I do not like about Cherry is that many insist on putting a stain on it. The beauty of wood is well, the natural beauty of wood.

As for the spray adhesive Viking is right. I however buy the nuclear stuff from my wholesale plywood and cabinet supplier.
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Old 03-18-2010, 06:19 AM   #36
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Hi Hampstead;
My interior is all new African OKUME [Mahogany] plywood. Overlander has given you an excellent tip on framing. Spruce is very light and strong, it takes glue very well.
As for the floor, it is not my intention to argue with guy's who want nyloboard. I have not tested that material for expansion/contraction and softening in high heat.
I do know one thing if it says "NYLON" it is affected by temperatures unless some other component is added to stabilize it. It can also be heavy because there is no lightweight nylon.

My floor is 1/2" aluminum clad both sides plywood. It is void less and glued with waterproof glue. Most of all it has the rigidity of 3/4" exterior ply because of aluminum skin on both sides. Tho seal the edges I have used 1/2" aluminum C channel from McMaster-Carr. That trim is 1/2" wide on top and 1.1/4" leg on the bottom. To make the round corners I have cut V shape notches in the 1.1/4" underside part of the trim. The 1/2" top has no problem accepting the radius. The outside C trim was filled to 1/8" thick layer of 3M 5200 adhesive. Holes were pre-drilled and countersunk for #6 SS flat head screws into the edge of ply horizontally. The trim was tapped on with plastic hammer over a piece of scrap wood not to distort the trim. Excess adhesive was cleaned up. The joints in H trim were also treated with 3M 5200. All fasteners to frame were pre-drilled with 3/16 drill into the frame. Holes in ply were opened up to 1/4". All screw holes were treated with 5200 but not countersunk. This allow the flat head 1/4x 20 SS screws to compress the top skin of the ply thus making them watertight. The 5200 also serves as form of locking component for the 1/4X20 screws. The joints between the individual sheets were joined via horizontally laid H trim. All trim is 1/16" in thickness. It needs to be said here that 3M 5200 makes a forever seal. Thanks "Boatdoc"
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Old 03-18-2010, 06:42 AM   #37
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All of our home furniture is cherry done in a natural (no tint) finish. I love the grain pattern, but we're thinking something lighter for the coach. I'm probably safer working with something like okume rather than messing with veneers. I could end up permanently glued to the Airstream.

The subfloor is already in, competely new plywood. I wasn't interested in nyloboard because I thought the original plywood performed well given the overall circumstances. Don't get me wrong, Doc, what you've done is impressive as heck, but I just need to squeeze another 25 years or so out of the Overlander.

My focus is more on flooring material than what I would generally subflooring. If I do cork, I may have to put in a smooth 1/4 plywood layer over the subfloor. In fact, I'd rather do a thin layer of real plywood rather than use the composite floating floor with cork surface. I've used Pergo and a few other products. I wouldn't use them in an Airstream where the humidity can fluctuate and there's a strong possibility of water.

I think Marcus has it right on the real linoleum as a nice product with regard to maintenance, but I do like the warmth, feel and "quiet" of cork.
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Old 03-18-2010, 07:33 AM   #38
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Hey Everybody, I'm new here but I am just finishing my resto and used cork for the floor and bamboo for all the cabinets, walls, countertops, etc. I'm very happy with my choices. Cheers, Brian
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Old 03-18-2010, 11:15 AM   #39
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Welcome to you Brian!
how about some pictures of your restoration? We all love to see what others have done with their Airstream interiors.
Good to have you aboard,
Rich the Viking


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Hey Everybody, I'm new here but I am just finishing my resto and used cork for the floor and bamboo for all the cabinets, walls, countertops, etc. I'm very happy with my choices. Cheers, Brian
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Old 03-18-2010, 11:40 AM   #40
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Not all okume plywood is the same. Some of it has a tendency to come apart between the layers of ply. I don't know if Boatdoc experienced this at all. The cheap grade of okume has waterproof glue, but it sometimes has too little. We used to use it for subtop material for tile and stone counters but it was less reliable than cdx fir ply and costs about the same. A furniture grade okume plywood is something I haven't seen yet. You can also use lyptus or african mahogany(called african cherry, also) or even phillipine mahogany to get a close resemblance to honduran mahogany. For myself, I could only be really happy with the real honduran stuff. There is no substitute for the depth and irridescence, and the fabulous colors, in any of the other mahoganys. It just cost an arm & a leg. You can't blame the hondurans, though, they finally figured out what their trees are really worth!

Rich the Viking

Quote:
Originally Posted by hampstead38 View Post
All of our home furniture is cherry done in a natural (no tint) finish. I love the grain pattern, but we're thinking something lighter for the coach. I'm probably safer working with something like okume rather than messing with veneers. I could end up permanently glued to the Airstream.

The subfloor is already in, competely new plywood. I wasn't interested in nyloboard because I thought the original plywood performed well given the overall circumstances. Don't get me wrong, Doc, what you've done is impressive as heck, but I just need to squeeze another 25 years or so out of the Overlander.

My focus is more on flooring material than what I would generally subflooring. If I do cork, I may have to put in a smooth 1/4 plywood layer over the subfloor. In fact, I'd rather do a thin layer of real plywood rather than use the composite floating floor with cork surface. I've used Pergo and a few other products. I wouldn't use them in an Airstream where the humidity can fluctuate and there's a strong possibility of water.

I think Marcus has it right on the real linoleum as a nice product with regard to maintenance, but I do like the warmth, feel and "quiet" of cork.
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Old 03-18-2010, 02:27 PM   #41
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images or link to them to see how it looks like... thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by boatdoc View Post
Hi Hampstead;
My interior is all new African OKUME [Mahogany] plywood. Overlander has given you an excellent tip on framing. Spruce is very light and strong, it takes glue very well.
As for the floor, it is not my intention to argue with guy's who want nyloboard. I have not tested that material for expansion/contraction and softening in high heat.
I do know one thing if it says "NYLON" it is affected by temperatures unless some other component is added to stabilize it. It can also be heavy because there is no lightweight nylon.

My floor is 1/2" aluminum clad both sides plywood. It is void less and glued with waterproof glue. Most of all it has the rigidity of 3/4" exterior ply because of aluminum skin on both sides. Tho seal the edges I have used 1/2" aluminum C channel from McMaster-Carr. That trim is 1/2" wide on top and 1.1/4" leg on the bottom. To make the round corners I have cut V shape notches in the 1.1/4" underside part of the trim. The 1/2" top has no problem accepting the radius. The outside C trim was filled to 1/8" thick layer of 3M 5200 adhesive. Holes were pre-drilled and countersunk for #6 SS flat head screws into the edge of ply horizontally. The trim was tapped on with plastic hammer over a piece of scrap wood not to distort the trim. Excess adhesive was cleaned up. The joints in H trim were also treated with 3M 5200. All fasteners to frame were pre-drilled with 3/16 drill into the frame. Holes in ply were opened up to 1/4". All screw holes were treated with 5200 but not countersunk. This allow the flat head 1/4x 20 SS screws to compress the top skin of the ply thus making them watertight. The 5200 also serves as form of locking component for the 1/4X20 screws. The joints between the individual sheets were joined via horizontally laid H trim. All trim is 1/16" in thickness. It needs to be said here that 3M 5200 makes a forever seal. Thanks "Boatdoc"
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Old 03-18-2010, 11:37 PM   #42
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There's no shortage of beautiful woods... and the craftsman to do them justice. I'm just not talented enough to ultra high end materials.
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