Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-12-2007, 07:12 PM   #15
Rivet Master
 
vswingfield's Avatar
 
1983 34' Excella
1967 24' Tradewind
Little Rock , Arkansas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,773
Images: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by vswingfield
Another wood to consider is Zepra Wood (AKA Zebrano). It has pale yellow and mahogany stripes about 1/8" with good figure. It complements mahogany very well. I covered the sliding doors in the front cap of my 67 with it and it complements the birtch in that trailer very well too. Birdseye maple is also very beautiful. A friend has new edge bamboo floors in her house, and I am considering that for my Excella. It is very light in color, and I have dark brown carpet. I think the zebra would look good against the white, but could be pricy.
OK, that is Zebra Wood not "Zepra" Wood. I have used it as veneer rather than boards or plywood. It can be kind of busy, but birtch cabinets with zebra doors or accents would be light and very nice.
__________________

__________________
vswingfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2007, 07:23 PM   #16
4 Rivet Member
 
muddy_hollow's Avatar
 
1965 20' Globetrotter
1956 22' Caravanner
Mendon , Massachusetts
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 468
Send a message via AIM to muddy_hollow Send a message via Yahoo to muddy_hollow
type versus availability

Here's my thoughts on types of wood to use for interiors and mind you I am doing my interior cabinets over in birch.

These exoctic species of wood look great as veneers and edge banding, but not everything looks good as edge banded plywood. So you either have to live with the edgebanded ply or use a solid wood. Finding a supplier for some of these exotic species is not easy. Heck finding a good lumber yard that sells birch can be a challenge. HD and Lowes sure don't carry it.

The point I am trying to make is choose a wood that is easy to find and looks good. Choosing a species of wood for the way it looks from a catalog may not yeild the results you think.

Personally, I agree with one of other posts birds eye maple is very nice. BUT EXPENSIVE!!. Cherry, birch, maple, ash, oak, some mahoganies, and poplar are pretty nice and not as hard to find at a good lumber supply.

HTH,

D
__________________

__________________
56' Caravanner 'The Broomstick'

muddy_hollow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2007, 08:45 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
zamboni's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 521
If you want to be environmentally friendly, as I know we all do, you could contact a local saw mill and see wha tthey have that was "recycled" from urban trees that had to be cut down for various reasons. Often they have tree species that woodworkers love at very reasonable prices...you will have to dimension cut it and plane it; but think of the stories you could tell.

I am an urban forester that works with local mills in the STL area to take the removed logs off our hands and mill it into usable lumber. We often have sweetgum, sycamore, oak, maple, poplar, ash that must be removed for various reasons. Generally, we chip and make landscape mulch out of all tree parts 12" or less, we save all tree parts 12" or greater and cut it into 12' lengths for our local mill resource to recycle into usable lumber. They often sell it for furniture, woodturning, hobbies, etc. at very resonable prices. I'm not sure of the exact web-link, but I will post that tomorrow...the local STL mill resource I deal w/ is Logs2lumber. You could search the web for something in your area.
FWIW, Bamboo is another very environmentally friendly wood product.
__________________
zamboni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2007, 06:23 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
boatdoc's Avatar
 
1973 Argosy 26
Norristown , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 644
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by LI Pets
In redoing the interior petitions and cabinets my wife and I are trying to choose a type of wood to use that won't be too dark but look good against the freshly painted white interior skin.

In conjunction with the walls and cabinets what color to use on the floor.

Our first choice is cherry finished natural, we think if its a dark color it will make the space feel small?

We're keeping all the tambor, painted white.
Hi LI Pets; I have wrestled with ideas for new interior since my wife does not like the dark interior of our Argosy. First and foremost concern to us, is the fact that we will not be able to regulate humidity level in the trailer all year long. This calls for Marine Quality plywood. After considering few available to us choices which are minimized by available thickness choice, I have settled on Okume, which is available from 4 MM to 3/4". Since 4 MM is the closest to the original thickness, it will fit the clips inside the moldings the best. Second reason for making such choice is the fact that OKUME is a marine ply which can withstand high levels of moisture because it is a marine ply. It can be stained into just about any shade. I will be finishing mine with Marine Epifanes varnish prior to final installation. This ply is AB rated, and it is available in two grades. One is certified by Lloyd's of London for marine construction [which is insurable performance by Lloyd's] and the second grade is made by the same plant in the same way, but the price is down to $37.00 per 4'x8' sheet in 4 MM simply because it is not certified by Lloyd's. The "A" side will be used as face while "B" side will be inside the walls and cabinets. 3/4 ply will be used on structural section of cabinetry and the counter top with Formica overlay. If anything I will be assured that I am protected from possible warping and de-laminating. The marine Epifanes is the finest marine varnish I have used. While it is bit pricey it is worth the difference. Thanks "Boatdoc"
__________________
boatdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 09:58 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
Doc,

What do you plan to use for your framing?
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 05:14 AM   #20
Rivet Master
 
boatdoc's Avatar
 
1973 Argosy 26
Norristown , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 644
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by hampstead38 View Post
Doc,

What do you plan to use for your framing?
Hi hampstead;
I have a 1973 26' Argosy. Most of the original framing was Mahogany. All plywood cabinetry is connected by aluminum trim which I have re-used after cleaning. I have chosen not to replicate wood framing for one simple reason. I had large stock of aluminum angle and a Miller Syncrowave 300 Tig welder. Sofa and bed frames were welded in upright joints of frame units such as face frame of the bed. Horizontals were SS riveted to provide some needed flex to reduce stress on welds which join large span's. This reduces vibration and stress loads on welded joints. Thus far we have used our Arg very heavily for two seasons [about 8000 miles] and everything is holding up very well. My wife loves the five coats of urethane Marine varnish over the Okume ply which has a lot of character. Back side of ply has one coat of sealer and only one coat of varnish.

If you are planning to use wood for framing I would use light color Mahogany with straight as possible grain. Use Gorilla Glue at joints but be sure to clean up the excess glue very well, because stain will not take over this glue. Another good product is ressourcinol glue [made from animal blood, widely used in waterproof marine applications] and cleans up better with water. The 12"X12" cork tile enhances the warm look. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
__________________
boatdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 09:00 AM   #21
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
Hey, Doc,

I have the original interior, but I kept it for templates rather than reuse. We're going a different direction on the interior layout. My first thought was to do aluminum framing, but I don't have the Tig welder technology or skillset. I had thought about using fastners so I could break down some things to get access.

Honestly, wood seems a little easier though I hadn't thought of mahogany. Do I need to dig up a winning lottery ticket... because I haven't done a price check on mahogany in awhile. I'm not far from Annapolis... maybe I can score something from a wayward boat builder?

As for cork, I love the idea of the cork floor, but I have to fix the leaks. My ten-hour driving in driving rain with huge gusts water-tight integrity test did not go well. I'm going to consult a "guru" on fixing the leaks, which seemed to occur mostly around the windows. After the trip, I wondered if I should just make a giant fiberglass pan for a floor and crown everything to run to a single floor drain.

I'm thinking of using your marine varnish tip to coat the subfloor. It can't hurt. I may with with 1/4" sheathing over the existing subfloor to give me a nice level surface. I like cork as a flooring material. I'd almost rather put down the floor and then put down the cabinets. Otherwise, it's going to feel a lot like a jigsaw puzzle.

Thanks for the advice. I think of an Airstream as a nonfloating boat so I'm using my Navy background to conceptualize the interior.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 09:36 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
utee94's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,636
I'd definitely advise putting down your flooring first and then putting furniture over it. You might spend a little more to put finish flooring over the entire subfloor, but in boating terms, the "fit & finish" turns out much nicer this way. The only consideration is that it will raise up any furniture and/or wall dividers by the thickness of the floor in any area where Airstream didn't originally put finish flooring down (in my case this was the above-floor black tank and tub, which were laid directly on the subfloor. In all other cases, the furniture was laid on top of the original VAT at the factory, which is pretty much the same thickness as the VCT I used to replace it, so minimal adjustments were necessary).

Anyway, it's not that difficult to account for the difference in height, and I love the finished look of a real floor underneath all of the cabinets and beds and whatnot.

-Marcus
utee94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 09:49 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
safari62's Avatar
 
1962 22' Safari
1957 22' Custom
Vacationland , Maine
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 922
Images: 43
I was lucky enough to find a model and year trailer that used a light colored wood (mostly 3/8" veneered oak plywood) with a light tan stain wash.
I think many refer to this a Danish or even Danish modern stain. It is kind of a mix of light beige with some light green. There is enough of it applied so that it smooths out the grain of the wood put you can still see the grain.
Only the front over head cabinets where still in very good condition. The rest had to be either sanded and restained and the mid section base and refer enclosure wood had to be replaced.

I found oak veneer at a speciality plywood supplier. For some reason these sections are 5' x 4' or some strange measurement like that. I can look it up.

But the hard part is sanding the 45 year old veneer enough to remove dirt and damage, but not sand through the veneer.

Then I experimented with different latex paints and color additives and applied as a wash to match the existing finish. Then I applied a satin polyethelene over the stain.

I really like the wood framing the Walter Cabinet Company used in early sixies trailers. It is strong and very light in weight. Easy to work with. I think it could be fir? Oak is used for bed sliders.

Also WHAT IS REALLY AMAZING IS that much of this framing is held it place by pan headed sheet metal screws. People hate them but they work. I found these to be easier to work with and replaced original during re-installion. Then put another 80k on the trailer as a road test. Tight.

A few photos.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	in&out (24).JPG
Views:	82
Size:	66.0 KB
ID:	98257   Click image for larger version

Name:	pix 026.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	223.6 KB
ID:	98258  

Click image for larger version

Name:	flowers 007.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	219.6 KB
ID:	98259  
__________________
safari62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 09:51 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
Since I'm not using any of the original interior, the height doesn't really matter. I like the idea of a flooring that protects everything including the "under-the-bed" storage area in the rear of the coach and under the kitchen cabinets. I've been thinking about a "pan" floor for the entire bathroom. There's no way my wife and I will use the bathroom at the same time so I thought the whole space could be essentially a walk-in shower. I go could with a curtain to minimize splashing onto the head, but everything else could be essentially waterproof. That's the only area where the flooring might be different.

Why would people hate panhead screws? I've never found them to be inherently evil?
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 10:18 AM   #25
Rivet Master
 
safari62's Avatar
 
1962 22' Safari
1957 22' Custom
Vacationland , Maine
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 922
Images: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by utee94 View Post
I'd definitely advise putting down your flooring first and then putting furniture over it. You might spend a little more to put finish flooring over the entire subfloor, but in boating terms, the "fit & finish" turns out much nicer this way. The only consideration is that it will raise up any furniture and/or wall dividers by the thickness of the floor in any area where Airstream didn't originally put finish flooring down (in my case this was the above-floor black tank and tub, which were laid directly on the subfloor. In all other cases, the furniture was laid on top of the original VAT at the factory, which is pretty much the same thickness as the VCT I used to replace it, so minimal adjustments were necessary).

Anyway, it's not that difficult to account for the difference in height, and I love the finished look of a real floor underneath all of the cabinets and beds and whatnot.

-Marcus
I like this idea in theory and probably would do this on a total frame off job where I could use one sheet of Marmoleum etc.

In my case where I had replaced only part of the sub floor and used the 1/4" underlayment to smooth out the surface, I later discovered it was useful to be able to see and inspect the original subfloor where it connects to the walls.

Why? The forgotten open window during a rain storm or even driving rain on a closed window and water runs down the wall and into the crack of the new flooring to the sub floor. I would rather be able to see and find water then to have to disappear out of site. I constantly check for leaks and seeing the sub floor adds peace of mind for me.

I did extend the vct into the closets and under bed, but all other unseen areas are still visable subfloor. Even Airstream did not carry the final flooring all the way to the front wall under the guacho in 62'.

AND if I ever sell it (never) I can show buyer that nice and dry sub floor instead of hidden mystery meat from the dark side.
__________________
safari62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 11:09 AM   #26
Restorations done right
Commercial Member
 
Frank's Trailer Works's Avatar
 
1962 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Vintage Kin Owner
Currently Looking...
Baltimore , Maryland
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,547
Images: 2
interesting how old thread come back around.

I have seen Safari62's trailer and it is very nice. Actually it is far from nice it is near perfect. If you are ever at a gathering with him, be sure to go see it first hand.

I wanted to throw a few things out... The framing I build is with sugar pine or spruce. Not the pine spruce you buy at the box store, I buy it at my hardwood supplier. Both of those woods are very light, very stable, and are strong. By buying them from my supplier, I get a knot free kiln dried material that does not twist or split. I then deck everything with 1/4" Baltic birch plywood. This is a very light, very stable plywood with zero voids. On top of that I put the wood veneer that the client wants. I buy all my veneer from Oakwood veneers. Here are some examples of finished work...
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1017.jpg
Views:	110
Size:	732.2 KB
ID:	98264
That is quarter sawn cherry. Two coats of lacquer based sealer followed by two coats of satin lacquer.
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1624.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	13.4 KB
ID:	98266
This is fiddle back maple.
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1623.jpg
Views:	101
Size:	20.9 KB
ID:	98265
Fiddle back with a solid wood face frame made of ambrosia maple. This is one of those recycled urban woods that is not often seen.
Frank's Trailer Works is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 11:32 AM   #27
Restorations done right
Commercial Member
 
Frank's Trailer Works's Avatar
 
1962 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Vintage Kin Owner
Currently Looking...
Baltimore , Maryland
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,547
Images: 2
Oh, sorry. To give proper credit also... Boatdoc's trailer.... unbelievable. When you go in there the lower jaw and upper jaw cease to meet.

Either of those guys trailers are very worth the gander. they both make you realize how far you have still to come.
Frank's Trailer Works is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2010, 12:11 PM   #28
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
Well, Frank, there's spectrum of folks from artists to craftsman to pros to amateurs. I'm down there in the sub-amateur level just above guys who use a chain saw to finish cabinets. (I do have a Stihl 026, but it's strictly for framing. )

As for the floor, I can see the advantage of a solid sheet of flooring and some kind of sealing against the wall to minimize moisture damage. I also see S62's point of retaining the ability to inspect the subfloor.

I think the first goal is to minimize water intrusion, but accidents can and do happen. While I'm apprehensive, I also have to remind myself that we picked up the Overlander after it had sat for many years and 90 percent of the floor was fine. The rot was limited to the rear bathroom and the door/fridge area. Overall, not bad for a trailer over 40.

I'm not building a house so the amount of lumber I need is fairly modest. I can probably afford to go pretty high end... and I generally loathe box store lumber. It's loosely grained, wet and generally junk. If you have a good Maryland supplier let me know. Or I can piggyback on one of your orders and push you a percentage for your trouble.

Back to flooring, I can see the advantages of putting down flooring ahead of the cabinets to get a crisp transition. So, it comes back to a question of what type. Is cork the best solution? Marmoleum? High end sheet vinyl?
__________________

hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wood walls in an A/S? Dave Cole Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 26 03-10-2008 12:35 PM
Tips for installing wood flooring? 64GT Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 31 12-06-2006 12:00 AM
year wood veneer changed to laminate? thx yukonsilver Interior Restoration Forum 4 04-18-2004 06:31 PM
Wood veneer type Silver Bullet Cabinets, Counter Tops & Furnishings 7 03-25-2004 07:46 PM
wood endcaps inside? Dave Cole Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 1 11-01-2002 03:32 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.