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Old 02-27-2015, 12:15 AM   #15
The Sign Lady
 
1969 23' Safari
1974 Argosy 22
1964 24' Tradewind
Victoria , British Columbia
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 675
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertair27 View Post
Hey Sign lady
Love this post. I'm working on a 69 Globetrotter that's very similar to the first pictures you posted. I vote for as original as possible.
I do have a question as to what you'll do for flooring? I'm thinking about install the original looking VCT.
Mike

Mike, it'll be cork, it's the only way to go for a trailer in my opinion. Warm on the foot, moisture & mold resistant, flexible and non allergenic. If you somehow damage it and take a chunk out (not likley) you can fix it by grinding up some cork and mixing it with glue and filling the hole. For this trailer I am going with floating click together. The Argosy will get glue down. I actually found the cork for both on our local used site. 20 bucks for the floating stuff and 30 for the glue down lot. After doing one of each I will know for certain what I will prefer in my newest addition the tradewind.

I have cork in my current landbased home as well as had it in my previous one. Three kids, two dogs, shoes on in the house kind of home and they hold up really well. Oh..and the best part dropped glasses don't break they bounce ☺
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:03 AM   #16
The Sign Lady
 
1969 23' Safari
1974 Argosy 22
1964 24' Tradewind
Victoria , British Columbia
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 675
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALUMINUMINUM View Post
Yup, The “nose knows” Entering a trailer, my olfactory sense engages before my visual.


With all your skills and talent... supportive, humorous, and kindly informative contributions, I'm absolutely baffled that you don't have an old Pfaff 130 on hand to tend your fabric needs.



Buy a fish or learn to fish...



Sewing isn't rocket science, it's working with sheet goods much the same way as sheet-metal, plywood, linoleum, drywall... Just a different method of joining and fastening. Few persons know the trade well enough to discern between an 80% good enough job and true art. I'll bet it'd only take you a couple hours to figure out how to make a benign colored Sale priced muslin-like fabric “case” for your foam that a Buyer could cover eventually with their “personal” choice. Then you have clean new fabric to augment the sale.


We bought new Serta foam, made a muslin case to cover the foam, and made a second cover with twenty dollars worth of boring IBM beige fabric. The first case lets the second case slide freely which prevents wrinkles. We display our favorite Pendleton as our decorative layer.



Today, sewing may not be viewed as the manliest of skills, but I'll bet I'm not the only fella on this forum that has an English wheel standing within reach of a sewing machine.


My awning is home-made too, With a Pfaff 130 and $20 worth of Sunbrella roll-end sale.
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f442...ng-121731.html



I'll agree that boomerang pattern predates your trailer. I built my counter-tops back when Formica coral, aqua and blue were still available. They are grey because as a recessive color(if you consider grey a color) it adds an illusion of spaciousness and clashes with nothing. The GT feels big inside.



You like boomerang, and the grey is still findable. It looks great with stainless, and is “sellable”.


If the overhead door vinyl is intact and clean, I'd leave it original. How wonderful to not have tambours! To me, having the last of the wood interiors, dictates a responsibility to preservation. You already know that the failing coat of clear lacquer on your ash can be restored easily with light Scotchbrite prep and ”re-nutrienting” the surface with a lacquer soaked rag. Lacquer is a good coating because you can quickly build it up in thin layers and it blends well onto itself.



I feel that offering a trailer clean, unscented, and close to original, without major appliance repair issues to the purchaser, but some room for their personalization, makes the broadest appeal.



I'm wondering if others are wishing that you rethink your decision and keep the nearly most remarkable Airstream trailer ever made??


It's all about the bass baby...It is hard to let go of an Airstream but I actually have three trailers now because a beautiful 63 Tradewind followed me home this summer and I love the ass end of the early 60 trailers more. I have been know to follow the nice butt trailers for miles out of my way just because.....Oh....yup I have issues...trailer stalker...

I do have two sewing machines, but I haven't done enough to feel I have profected the trade, and I'm one of those wack jobs that it would kill me to send a poor job of anything into the world so when we start using the trade wind I will make the fabric goods for that. Then it'll be okay for the kids and dog to romp around in because it'll be my test pilot that I can redo when all the little boogers age out and get the boot 😉

The wood in mine is in great shape save for I had to replace the bottom of one overhead cabinet as a hood scoop leak damaged it too bad and one end panel had so many different screw holes and stick-on hooks on it that it wasn't salvageable so I had to replace it. Maybe I'll try lacquer on the finish there.

I will most definitely be making one of those vintage awnings like yours for the Tradewind when I start playing with her though, those look awesome !

My main incentive for getting this Safari up to top notch condition is preserving get her for another generation. If she's in great original shape when she leaves it will be harder for a new buyer to gutt her. I have a lady that keeps popping by when I am working offering me more money each time she comes because she has some architectural insite for what she wants to do to her. None of which involves a single original feature other than the exterior. She will NEVER get this trailer.

Hope to not offend anyone here that may have altered an AS...I'm all fine with gutting the 70's vinyl board trailers and getting whimsical or doing your best with what you have when you find an older one where the wood maybe is to far gone from water or fire damage but simply put, finding real wood ones that haven't been "improved" is getting harder and harder and more effort should be kept in to keeping some original. I think I'll lock the door if I see that girl coming my way again...☺
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:55 AM   #17
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1969 25' Tradewind
Shasta Lake , California
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 686
Clean it and sell it.

If it looks anything like the pic's you posted your good to go.

Spray the fabric and screens with Fabrez.

Let the next owner do the mods
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Old 02-27-2015, 09:17 AM   #18
NO HUMBLE OPINION
 
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1968 20' Globetrotter
ANN ARBOR , THE GREAT LAKES
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 374
"It's all about the bass baby...It is hard to let go of an Airstream but I actually have three trailers now because a beautiful 63 Tradewind followed me home this summer and I love the ass end of the early 60 trailers more. I have been know to follow the nice butt trailers for miles out of my way just because.....Oh....yup I have issues...trailer stalker...

I do have two sewing machines, but I haven't done enough to feel I have profected the trade, and I'm one of those wack jobs that it would kill me to send a poor job of anything into the world so when we start using the trade wind I will make the fabric goods for that. Then it'll be okay for the kids and dog to romp around in because it'll be my test pilot that I can redo when all the little boogers age out and get the boot ��

The wood in mine is in great shape save for I had to replace the bottom of one overhead cabinet as a hood scoop leak damaged it too bad and one end panel had so many different screw holes and stick-on hooks on it that it wasn't salvageable so I had to replace it. Maybe I'll try lacquer on the finish there.

I will most definitely be making one of those vintage awnings like yours for the Tradewind when I start playing with her though, those look awesome !

My main incentive for getting this Safari up to top notch condition is preserving get her for another generation. If she's in great original shape when she leaves it will be harder for a new buyer to gutt her. I have a lady that keeps popping by when I am working offering me more money each time she comes because she has some architectural insite for what she wants to do to her. None of which involves a single original feature other than the exterior. She will NEVER get this trailer.

Hope to not offend anyone here that may have altered an AS...I'm all fine with gutting the 70's vinyl board trailers and getting whimsical or doing your best with what you have when you find an older one where the wood maybe is to far gone from water or fire damage but simply put, finding real wood ones that haven't been "improved" is getting harder and harder and more effort should be kept in to keeping some original. I think I'll lock the door if I see that girl coming my way again..."

I wholly concur. Sounds like the Safari is safe with you, and screening a seller that way is appropriate. I look at every Airstream selling on eBay and CL each morning, and some of the atrocities inflicted upon the old beauties is depressing.

Most anyone can chose to buy or finance a new Airstream with their inheritance, hard earned money, or lottery winnings and instantly assume the pride of Airstream ownership...

With an ever lessening number of old rebuild-able trailers, It's reassuring to find folks with the foresight, consciousness, respect, and courage to dedicate the five years of budgeted time and money to get the old betties back on the road.

It takes a lot of heart.
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Old 03-02-2015, 08:52 AM   #19
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1957 22' Caravanner
1960 26' Overlander
1963 24' Tradewind
El Paso , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 944
Images: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesignlady View Post
Mike, it'll be cork, it's the only way to go for a trailer in my opinion. Warm on the foot, moisture & mold resistant, flexible and non allergenic. If you somehow damage it and take a chunk out (not likley) you can fix it by grinding up some cork and mixing it with glue and filling the hole. For this trailer I am going with floating click together. The Argosy will get glue down. I actually found the cork for both on our local used site. 20 bucks for the floating stuff and 30 for the glue down lot. After doing one of each I will know for certain what I will prefer in my newest addition the tradewind. I have cork in my current landbased home as well as had it in my previous one. Three kids, two dogs, shoes on in the house kind of home and they hold up really well. Oh..and the best part dropped glasses don't break they bounce ☺
What kind of used site are you able to find cork flooring? I do agree with you on the cork flooring,I really like the look and feel of cork. I might have to rethink what I'm putting down in my GT.
Thanks
Mike
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Old 03-02-2015, 09:48 AM   #20
The Sign Lady
 
1969 23' Safari
1974 Argosy 22
1964 24' Tradewind
Victoria , British Columbia
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 675
I used our local get rid of crap site, usedvictoria.com. Same concept as Craigslist and Kijiji. So just keep an your eye out on whichever used sites are most popular in your neck of the woods. The cork isn't used,in both cases it was just over purchases by homeowners that had just put some in their homes.
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Old 03-02-2015, 09:50 AM   #21
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1957 22' Caravanner
1960 26' Overlander
1963 24' Tradewind
El Paso , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 944
Images: 32
Thanks
I appreciate the tip.
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Old 03-03-2015, 06:34 PM   #22
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1957 22' Caravanner
1960 26' Overlander
1963 24' Tradewind
El Paso , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 944
Images: 32
I just saw this from Versacork,expensive but so cool.
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Old 03-12-2015, 05:37 PM   #23
The Sign Lady
 
1969 23' Safari
1974 Argosy 22
1964 24' Tradewind
Victoria , British Columbia
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 675
So steering away from my original idea of boomerang I found a very neutral countertop that pulls from the wall colouring perfectly. It is a Formica product called Paloma Bisque and looks like a natural stone. It is nice, warm and bright and works with the interior very well.

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It's a slow day here at work so I got to work making my counters. I took advantage of Lammy our Sign shop laminator and put my countertops through the good ol' squwisher machine for a nice smooth finish using some nice solid sign grade plywood to back it up with.

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I wanted to soup up the front of my fridge as it is just boring steel and all the fixtures in my Safari are brass so the fridge stands out like a sore thumb, so I went online and found a good digital image of the countertops and dropped it in behind a vintage licence plate of North America map I made. I printed it up on our wide format digital printer and I think I'll apply it to the steel panel so if someone want to put magnets on the fridge they can.

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I was happy I even found a 1969 British Columbia plate to drop into the map

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So next question. I think it looks awesome but would you want it on your fridge if you were buying the trailer. Should I make the panel double sided so they can turn it around if they don't like it? I could match the wood panelling or the new counters...
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Old 03-13-2015, 08:30 AM   #24
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1999 30' Excella 1000
small town , Maryland
Join Date: Sep 2010
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I would double side it just in case the new owner didn't like your beautiful art work. The factory installed wood paneling on my refrigerator..... must be a reason for this. Be careful.... the nicer you make this trailer, the harder it will be to let it go
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