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Old 04-26-2009, 07:13 PM   #15
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I've melted a few destruct-all and sabre-saw blades on that stuff.

Think tungsten-carbide faced router bits & blades, just like the masonry drill bits they have cutting inserts brazed its respective form; If you decline the expense of that (shop around, a one-time use China router bit is not spendy) at the very least a bi-metal blade w/ cobalt steel teeth on HS steel blank to get through the material smoothly on the rough in cut. Don't force anything and let the blade/bits cool from airflow by merely nibbling away at it...
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Old 04-27-2009, 07:52 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Woody.303 View Post
Don,

DO NOT USE SILICONE!!!!

I will have to agree that silicone is the traditional method of applying an undermount sink. However, the latest trend is to use epoxy. It is stronger, longer lasting, and sets much faster. Woody
What epoxy would you recommend.

I have completed the cutout by making a rough cut with a jig saw and then using the router with as flush blade following the template I made from 1/4" mdf. I then sanded the surface and put a small round bullnose curve on the edges with just sandpaper. I must say its looks real good. The counter top will be installed over a 1/2" plywood subtop attached to my cabinet. I will sit the sink in a cutout on the subtop with a slight "Rabbet" edge and use silicone and/or epoxy to hold the corian in place. I am working on the plumbing now hooking up the drain and p-trap.

All in all no problems using regular wood cutting saws and bits. It is a nessy job cutting the corian. White powder and flakes every where. I will post some pics latter.

Don
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Old 04-27-2009, 08:12 AM   #17
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What epoxy would you recommend?

Don
Don,

I highly recommend using "West System" epoxy. It can be purchased at any good boating supply store, or online at West Marine. The bad thing is that you will most likely have to buy more epoxy than you will use in your lifetime.

West Marine: West Marine Search Tool

If you don't want to go that route (or to find smaller bottle sizes), then the other recommendation would be to check your local yellow pages for an R/C airplane store in your area. It should be listed under "hobbies".

As a last resort, go to your local hardware store.

Please post some photos, we would love to see your work.

Woody
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:06 AM   #18
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Don,


As a last resort, go to your local hardware store.

Please post some photos, we would love to see your work.

Woody
What about

PL Premium Polyurethane Construction Adhesive.

PL Premium is a polyurethane adhesive that provides superior results and is safer to use. PL Premium generates three times the power of traditional construction adhesives. It may be used inside or outside and will last as long as the surfaces it joins together.

3 times stronger than ordinary adhesives
Water and weatherproof
Bonds to wood, metal, stone, concrete, masonry, bricks
100% Polyurethane
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Old 04-28-2009, 07:49 PM   #19
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Don, the rabbet in the subtop is what holds the weight of the sink. You can use anything waterproof here, adhesive is better than sealant though, so it sounds like the polyurethane is a good product to use.

Sorry I couldn't reply to your PM's. I was at the vintage restoration rally in New Mexico and couldn't get my computer to access the internet there.

Looking forward to the pics...

Rich
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:58 PM   #20
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Hi I am a union carpenter that has fabricated corian tops for hundreds of grocery stores throughout the midwest. Do not use a jig saw skillsaw on the cut out, they will cause stress fractures that will deteriorate in time. Solid surface materials are just like pastic or concrete in the way heat and cool conditions make them swell or contract. If you can make a pattern out of wood and then use a few visegrip clamps with the flat face head on each jaw will make it easier to hold your pattern in place while you route the hole out for the sink. The router bit you will need is a flush cut bit with a top bearing. If you have a half inch collet on your router that is the safest and most durable bit to use. This would mean you have a big enough router to handle this type of bit. A 1 1/2 horse router or bigger is ideal. These bits can cost about $40 -60 and are carbide tipped. Remember solid surface materials are an acrylic material and when they get hot they will warp if not secured properly to a firm subserface. You have to glue them down with 100% silicone cauking. The person who said not to hook the sink to the bottom of the solid serface material with silicone is probably right. Under mount sinks are cheeper in quality than Cast Iron and enamle. Set on top sinks are easy to change when they go bad after like 50 years, but you will never see a stanless or solid surface sink last that long. When you build the top you can use a skill saw or a table saw to cut the edge but make sure you don't let the top bend more than 1/4 inch or you will cause stress fractures you won't see until a short time down the road. Like I said heat and cool conditions will make the product swell and contract wich will open up these cracks and then you will hate it. I have considered puting solid surface material on my counter top in my airstream but I am considering an alternative to it since it is so vulnerable to vibration and movement. I have it in my house which isn't going to move unless we have an earth quake. If you deside to build your own make sure you clean all serfaces where you have to glue an overhang or backsplash, with denatured alchohol and paper towels. If you get any dust or contimanate in the glue it will show when you finish the joint surface. Cut and shape all finished edges with a straight edge and a router. Then sand with a micron sandpaper starting with 80, 60 and then a 30 micron grit and if you want to shine it to a semigloss finish use scotch brite pad made for solid surface tops. Once this is done you can buy polishing compound or auto buffing compound and then a good acrylic polisher. Investigate the proceedure before you get too involved as it is very expensive to go from start to finish.

Good luck,

SinclairR
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Old 04-29-2009, 01:28 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adonh View Post
What about

PL Premium Polyurethane Construction Adhesive.

PL Premium is a polyurethane adhesive that provides superior results and is safer to use. PL Premium generates three times the power of traditional construction adhesives. It may be used inside or outside and will last as long as the surfaces it joins together.

3 times stronger than ordinary adhesives
Water and weatherproof
Bonds to wood, metal, stone, concrete, masonry, bricks
100% Polyurethane
Don,

The polyurethane adhesive would work just fine. It might even be a bit more flexible, which is good in a moving, swaying trailer.

I've used thousands of tubes of that stuff, and can tell you that it will stick to just about everything. Definitely wear some old clothes, and put a paper towel under the tube to catch the drips.

If you plan on doing any typing the following day, then I would recommend a pair of gloves.

Woody
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Old 04-29-2009, 01:34 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by SinclairR View Post
Hi I am a union carpenter that has fabricated corian tops for hundreds of grocery stores throughout the midwest. Do not use a jig saw skillsaw on the cut out, they will cause stress fractures that will deteriorate in time. Solid surface materials are just like pastic or concrete in the way heat and cool conditions make them swell or contract. If you can make a pattern out of wood and then use a few visegrip clamps with the flat face head on each jaw will make it easier to hold your pattern in place while you route the hole out for the sink. The router bit you will need is a flush cut bit with a top bearing. If you have a half inch collet on your router that is the safest and most durable bit to use. This would mean you have a big enough router to handle this type of bit. A 1 1/2 horse router or bigger is ideal. These bits can cost about $40 -60 and are carbide tipped. Remember solid surface materials are an acrylic material and when they get hot they will warp if not secured properly to a firm subserface. You have to glue them down with 100% silicone cauking. The person who said not to hook the sink to the bottom of the solid serface material with silicone is probably right. Under mount sinks are cheeper in quality than Cast Iron and enamle. Set on top sinks are easy to change when they go bad after like 50 years, but you will never see a stanless or solid surface sink last that long. When you build the top you can use a skill saw or a table saw to cut the edge but make sure you don't let the top bend more than 1/4 inch or you will cause stress fractures you won't see until a short time down the road. Like I said heat and cool conditions will make the product swell and contract wich will open up these cracks and then you will hate it. I have considered puting solid surface material on my counter top in my airstream but I am considering an alternative to it since it is so vulnerable to vibration and movement. I have it in my house which isn't going to move unless we have an earth quake. If you deside to build your own make sure you clean all serfaces where you have to glue an overhang or backsplash, with denatured alchohol and paper towels. If you get any dust or contimanate in the glue it will show when you finish the joint surface. Cut and shape all finished edges with a straight edge and a router. Then sand with a micron sandpaper starting with 80, 60 and then a 30 micron grit and if you want to shine it to a semigloss finish use scotch brite pad made for solid surface tops. Once this is done you can buy polishing compound or auto buffing compound and then a good acrylic polisher. Investigate the proceedure before you get too involved as it is very expensive to go from start to finish.

Good luck,

SinclairR
I will agree with most of this. I have found that stainless steel sinks tend to have the highest longevity rating though. This does depend on the gauge of the material, thicker is better.

Woody

Woody
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Old 04-29-2009, 07:43 AM   #23
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final steps

The 3 solid surface pieces have been cut, one 46" X 30" with the sink cutout. This covers the area from the right wall over to the cutout for the range top. One piece that fits behind the range and one small piece 2" wide that fits just to the left of the range top. The sub top has been attached and the undermount sink has be attached in the rabbet with the PL adhesive. I have completed all of the new plumbing drains and water supply hookups and built a new shelve under the sink with a slide out drawer. I also have a tile back splash that I will install later probably to a cut down backer board. In my trial runs it really look good. I have the special color matched adhesive to bond the 2 small visible cuts that comes in a 250mm tube with 2 sections designed to deliver a 10 to 1 mix through a special tip that fits on the tube. The only problem is that it requires a special type of caulking gun that has 2 plungers in order to mix the correct ratio, and this gun cost $75. I improvised my own gun from an old caulking gun that I had and it should work for the small cuts that I have.

Now I should be ready to actually attach/install the Corian sections to the sub top. My thoughts are to use the PL adhesive to attach/bond the Corian to the sub top and to apply a bead of clear GE II silicone around the bottom of Corian sink cut out and the stainless steel sink edge exposed in the rabbet.

Any thoughts before I proceed would be appreciated.

Don
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Old 04-29-2009, 09:54 AM   #24
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Are any of you considering the additional weight you may be adding to your coach(es) with the use of materials manufactured for 'stationary' structures? Sure a simple galley countertop and sink 'may' not be an appreciable weight gain but if you are remodeling much of your coach the added weight will mount up VERY rapidly.....especially if you are reworking 31 feet of coach.
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Old 04-29-2009, 10:08 AM   #25
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Are any of you considering the additional weight you may be adding to your coach(es) Neil.
The actual solid surface counter top with stainless sink and 1/2 plywood sub top is about 50lbs I would say. The old Formica counter top was probably around 20 lbs. I had already taken out the old furnace and the stove with oven that that were pretty heavy so I believe I some weight to give. Also I took out the sliding shower door which was never used and that probably saved another 10lbs.

The other cabinet and door work has been done with 1/4 stock and vinal wall covering over the closet doors. My new fridge weighs I know less than the old Dometic.

But I agree you have to balance out what you add with what to take out.

Don
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Old 04-29-2009, 11:21 AM   #26
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My thoughts are to use the PL adhesive to attach/bond the Corian to the sub top and to apply a bead of clear GE II silicone around the bottom of Corian sink cut out and the stainless steel sink edge exposed in the rabbet.

Any thoughts before I proceed would be appreciated.

Don
Don,

I've not had much in the way of good luck when using 100% silicone. I would use a siliconized latex caulking. Silicone especially doesn't stick to stainless steel very well, and it also tends to mildew.

Woody
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Old 04-29-2009, 11:38 AM   #27
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Are any of you considering the additional weight you may be adding to your coach(es) with the use of materials manufactured for 'stationary' structures? Sure a simple galley countertop and sink 'may' not be an appreciable weight gain but if you are remodeling much of your coach the added weight will mount up VERY rapidly.....especially if you are reworking 31 feet of coach.
Neil.
Neil,

I seriously doubt if the added weight here will be of much worry. It might be a total gain of ten pounds when all is said and done.

If he continues with more projects, then it may be of concern. He can upgrade the carrying capacity of his axles if necessary. I have acquired some information/opinions from Inland Andy about this very subject and would be more than willing to share.

Woody
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Old 04-29-2009, 03:17 PM   #28
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Quote:
Are any of you considering the additional weight you may be adding to your coach(es) with the use of materials manufactured for 'stationary' structures? Sure a simple galley countertop and sink 'may' not be an appreciable weight gain but if you are remodeling much of your coach the added weight will mount up VERY rapidly.....especially if you are reworking 31 feet of coach.
Neil.
It's certainly a valid consideration. At the same time, I am replacing my original cast iron sinks with stainless steel ones, that weigh perhaps 1/20th as much (if even that much). And, my plastic, on-demand freshwater tank is also substantially lighter than the original, galvanized, pressurized one.

Sure, Airstream did a good job of minimizing weight in their original designs, but some of the more modern options are much, much lighter than anything Airstream considered "back in the day."

Overall, it's a balancing act when performing a renovation or restoration. Weight is added in some places, and reduced in others. Being aware of this at every step is indeed quite important.

-Marcus
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