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Old 10-22-2014, 08:20 AM   #15
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Well, of course they back out due to vibration. This is a no brainer. But the answer shoudn't be to treat the trailer as a house. The answer SHOULD be to use fasteners designed to handle vibration.

You could also say "notice the hardware on your airplane doesn't fall off". And then look at that hardware, holding aluminum sheet together. See any wood screws in your Boeings? No. See anybody from Cessna suggesting you use Gorilla Glue from now on to hold your doors closed? No.

In the marine construction industry, it's a pretty common thing to specify marine grade hardware. Everyone knows that the stuff you get from Lowes or Home Depot is basically unfit for marine use. In the aviation business, you definitely use Aviation grade nuts and bolts and fasteners. Yet the RV people still insist on using common wood screws to hold together assemblies that are supposedly designed to be pulled down the highway and over park roads. To say eliminate the vibration is a cop out. How about designing the product for the application?

Threaded inserts. Locktite. It's not rocket surgery.
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:54 AM   #16
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See anybody from Cessna suggesting you use Gorilla Glue from now on to hold your doors closed? No.
Of course not. They use 3M Scotchweld adhesive.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:30 AM   #17
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One of my hobbies is radio control model aircraft, both fixed and rotary winged, and keeping fasteners in place is a problem. So I have transferred the things I've learned about fasteners in this hobby to the Airstream. If it's a machine screw into metal, or with a nut, I use Locktite blue if I want to be able to take it apart, Red if I never want it to come apart.

With a screw that comes out of wood, simply retightening it will insure future failure. The permanent cure is to use some CA glue (crazy glue) soaked into the wood that the screw goes into, and let dry for a moment or two. This makes the wood itself hard as metal, and then reinsert the screw and tighten as usual. It will not come out again, but you can still get it out if you want because the CA glue actually does not stick well to the metal screw, it just hardens the wood allowing the screw to hold.

Thick CA glue works well with screws or machine screws into plastic, but apply the glue to the threads and then insert. Thick CA takes a little longer to harden than the thin.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:33 AM   #18
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Has anyone used wood glue to secure cabinet screws? Just sounds too simple of a fix... but simple is good enough for me.
The self closing drawer slides on my 2014 FC 20' were only held to the drawers themselves with two small screws. One did not work on delivery. After I got it, I looked and found places for at least two more screws on each of the slides which had not been used by the factory. I put tiny, short flat head screws in each of them, sealed with some white (or yellow) wood glue. I also glued the original ones. I have driven about 12,000 miles since this "repair/modification" and have had a couple of the drawers out for various reasons. All looks sound now, the extra screws and glue have held up very well.

It is hard for me to believe that AS used only two very tiny screws to hold the slides onto the drawers, some of which are pretty big and expected them to hold up.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:33 AM   #19
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Easiest way to keep screws in place is to get a handful of wooden golf tees and insert them in the existing holes with a dab of glue and break or cut them off flush.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:40 AM   #20
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One suggestion for the 2006 Safari with the front couch that pulls out to become a bed, or some sorts.

There is a strip of wood to support the, sorta bed, to firm the frame. Those screws go through holes in the metal to the outside strip of wood with fabric. I drilled a hole through the frame hole, a slightly smaller hole would work, all the way through the outside wood with fabric cover.

I used 5 or 6 carriage bolts, inserted from the front and tightened from the inside. These never came loose and the carriage bolt heads look fine as well.

Bob... I hope you add your suggestion(s) as well.

I hope that the axle vibration do not loosen the lug nuts like the wood screws back out at will. Some other brands of trailers have walls that seem to be made of compressed... cardboard. How do those screw hold up? Or do you need a shopping cart full with glue, epoxy putty, liquid nails...?

My thought was trailers were made to come apart so a new one looked better the longer you kept yours. I use to drive my pickups and SUV's for 150,000 to 200,000 miles. Now, with the cost of replacement parts... I sell or trade when the drive train warranty is still in full force. An Airstream with the two year warranty, for some, might be a few summer trips of wear and tear. Still practically new when sold.

You need at least five years or more to use the depreciation between what you paid and being able to sell at a reasonable price, used. By the time your trailer is six years old, it is held together better than from the factory. I do not know how you can let your current AS go when you have tweaked it to exceed the factory built interior... As Napoleon discovered: For the want of a nail (for a horse shoe), the war was lost.

For the want of a "screw, the trailer was lost". May the "force" be with you. In the form of glue or epoxy putty.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:51 AM   #21
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Another fix for loose screws and cabinet doors opening. As for the screws, if the hole is elongated wood filler such as DAP should be used first as it can be drilled and re-tapped. Then and for those holes not elongated use a dab of silicone in the hole, it will dry to hold the screw, but remain flexible enough to remove the screw if needed. Wood glue dries to hard and could tear the wood if removal is needed. A simple and temporary fix for cabinet doors opening on the road is a few strips of blue painters tape with low tack adhesive when towing. Worked great for me with a new 23 FC on a 1900 mile trip. Nothing fancy but quick to apply before leaving and a snap to remove after arriving.
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Old 10-23-2014, 08:58 AM   #22
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Had my one cupboard door shake off when travelling west on I-94 in either MN or WI because there is not enough "blacktop" put on over the concrete I drove these highways in a transport truck from 1985 till 2010 and they would shake everything loose in the cab that wasn't really secure!
Thanks for the info about piano hinges had thought about trying them glad to see they work !
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Old 10-23-2014, 09:07 AM   #23
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"Diz ſagent uns die wſen, ein nagel behalt ein ſen, ein ſen ein ros, ein ros ein man, ein man ein burc, der ſtrten kan"; The wise tell us that a nail keeps a shoe, a shoe (keeps) a horse, a horse (keeps) a knight (or man), a knight, who can fight, (keeps) a castle (c. 1230, Freidank)

A fine old proverb. No connection to Napoleon.
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Old 10-23-2014, 09:14 AM   #24
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Had my one cupboard door shake off when travelling west on I-94 in either MN or WI because there is not enough "blacktop" put on over the concrete
If they're using blacktop over concrete, it's no wonder. The proper way to repair concrete is to chip out the bad concrete and pour new concrete. Asphalt (AKA blacktop) on top of concrete is only a short-term shortcut fix.

Sorry. I can't help it. I'm still an engineer, and it makes me wince to see poorly-engineered anything
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:42 AM   #25
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I've had success with using brass threaded inserts that screw into the enlarged hole. The inserts themselves are threaded to accept standard machine screws and are available in assorted sizes. I've been getting them at Lowe's but they can also be ordered through Rockler.
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Old 11-23-2014, 09:55 AM   #26
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Easiest way to keep screws in place is to get a handful of wooden golf tees and insert them in the existing holes with a dab of glue and break or cut them off flush.
You can also just dip a wooden toothpick, or two for a larger hole, dip them in a good wood glue and use them the same as the golf tees.

also, any kind of standard, cheap fingernail polish works just about as good as Locktite. You can get it anywhere, and may even have some on board already if there's a female in the vicinity.
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