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Old 05-01-2009, 04:17 PM   #15
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Bluto, You don't thin Watco or tung oil. They are very thin already. Watco will tend to lift deteriorated finishes where tung oil will help hold them in place. The clear polyurethane mentioned by RedhawkerII can be thinned to soak in better. It will leave a shiny surface that I find shows defects more than a satin sheen will. I prefer Formby's tung oil in satin sheen, or any tung oil in satin, or semi gloss if you like a little bit more shine to it.
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Old 05-02-2009, 09:03 AM   #16
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Bluto, You don't thin Watco or tung oil. They are very thin already. Watco will tend to lift deteriorated finishes where tung oil will help hold them in place. The clear polyurethane mentioned by RedhawkerII can be thinned to soak in better. It will leave a shiny surface that I find shows defects more than a satin sheen will. I prefer Formby's tung oil in satin sheen, or any tung oil in satin, or semi gloss if you like a little bit more shine to it.
Rich

Thanks!
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Old 08-06-2014, 09:38 AM   #17
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So as not to confuse anyone reading this post now, in 2014. Any questions I asked above in the posts were refering to an older 1987 trailer I had at that time. Since I now have a more recent model and don't have the same problems with the finish on the wood.
I doubt if the info in the earlier posts would work with the finishes AS now uses in the Classic, although, I really don't know. I'd hate for anyone to use the oils on a newer trailer and possibly ruin the finish.
If anyone knows, please post the info.
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Old 08-06-2014, 10:11 AM   #18
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You know, I have used the last couple of years products to restore and revive the finish on the woodwork in the Interstate.

Currently, Rejuvenate Cabinet & Furniture Restorer and Protectant. Have done some touchup, first, with cherry stain, in areas near the floor that have seen a bit of stress.

Has worked beautifully. Makes them look brand new, and I think protects some from the elements they are exposed to.


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Old 08-07-2014, 12:39 AM   #19
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Thanks Maggie, that's good to hear.
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Old 02-27-2015, 04:17 PM   #20
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I use the Danish oil on both my bed (made of teak) and the cabinets in my TT. If the wood is really dry, you may need a second coat. Here in the mountains is can be very dry over the winter months, so it is often necessary to do this twice in the spring and then again in the fall. Oiling the wood is how it was done for centuries and is less likely to cause anyone with allergies problems once applied. I believe the process is also more controllable and will allow you to get just the right look.
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Old 03-14-2015, 01:11 PM   #21
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We just got our first AS (1966 Overlander) and the woodwork looks pretty good, but I'd like any suggestions on how to make it look the best without full refinishing. I've done nothing but furniture polish so far. Is there a cleaning/sealing process that would help? Oils? Polishes? Basically, I want to have a nice look without complete refinishing.



Thanks In Advance!

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For what ever it's worth to you, I restored and repaired antique furniture for a living to last ten years before I retired.
Use clear, (or tinted) Bri-Wax, apply a thin layer, let it dry, then buff it with a brush, like you would polish your shoes with. After that, use an old T shirt, or a soft cotton rag, and polish it further. Usually, nothing more needs to be done.
If the cabinets are extremly dirty, before you wax, clean them with Murphy's Oil soap and water. You don't have to soak it in, just use a cloth dampened with Murphy's.

Forget "Lemon oil", it is mineral spirits (paint thinner) scented with enough citrus oil to smell like lemon. It actually makes the finish worse each time you use it. Howard's products are fair, but highly over rated.

Watco oils are OK if you sand very lightly first, but if there is any loose finish, when the Watco dries, you'll have a bigger mess than you started with..

Good luck

Larry C
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Old 03-14-2015, 06:24 PM   #22
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Thiss sounds like great advice. I want to save this info.


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Old 03-14-2015, 07:05 PM   #23
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One word of caution. If you are trying to put any polyurethane or similar over any old finish be sure all wax, oil or silicone (found in many furniture polishes) is off first. I suggest using TSP (Tri sodium Phosphate) sold in any hardware store. You mix it with water. Wear gloves. wash well with oooo steel wool and dry well after a scrub. Then a light scuff sanding of the old finish with 320 grit Silicon carbide sandpaper. Then apply your poly.

I suggest you do this to a test door. The one that is most hidden. If you do not completely remove all the wax and oils first the new finish will separate. You will see cratering called fish eye. Then you have a big problem. Preparation is the key.

Briwax is good and comes in some colors, and is a good temporary fix.
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Old 03-14-2015, 07:33 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Bluestar99 View Post
One word of caution. If you are trying to put any polyurethane or similar over any old finish be sure all wax, oil or silicone (found in many furniture polishes) is off first. I suggest using TSP (Tri sodium Phosphate) sold in any hardware store. You mix it with water. Wear gloves. wash well with oooo steel wool and dry well after a scrub. Then a light scuff sanding of the old finish with 320 grit Silicon carbide sandpaper. Then apply your poly.

I suggest you do this to a test door. The one that is most hidden. If you do not completely remove all the wax and oils first the new finish will separate. You will see cratering called fish eye. Then you have a big problem. Preparation is the key.

Briwax is good and comes in some colors, and is a good temporary fix.

The Briwax technique that I mentioned earlier, should be redone perhaps once a year.

TSP is a harsh cleaner, use it sparingly. Polyurethane finishes are durable, but they are not a "reactive" finish, when you apply them, you are simply putting on a very thin layer of plastic over a lacquer finish. It wil usually peal off eventually.

If the wood has been polished with a silicone, such as "Pledge", it cannot be removed, even with TSP and it makes recoating difficult to say the least.

If a person must recoat, try "Polycrylic" by Minwax, I've use it a lot, it's a water base, and dries incredibly hard. We've used it to cover countertops, as an experiment, and it lasted 4 years.

Another sugestion, use a clear satin finish, it won't be shiny, and will look a lot more professional.

For whatever it's worth.

Larry
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:14 PM   #25
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Hi ya'll I used to be Redhawker 2 on this site years ago...ha thats funny for it to come up again. I think back then I was using minwax clear polyurethane to do the interior of our place here. But after using it in outdoor situations- I saw that it broke down pretty fast and was not as durable as I wanted it to be. I since then switched over to Spar Marine Varnish (lots of Stores have it. I did the whole interior (er?) of this trailer with it and it has stayed true to its purpose. Now I think I have recovered from the fumes.
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:55 PM   #26
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Don't use real steel wool. It leaves tiny fragments that will rust and leave a mess in any water-borne finish. Use a ScotchBrite equivalent pad abrasive pad in 0000 instead. I think they are gray.

My dad used to use fine brass wool instead of steel on his boat varnish jobs to prevent rust stains. Probably not available anymore.


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