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Old 07-13-2015, 04:08 PM   #1
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1967 17' Caravel
, Oklahoma
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What all do I need to redo my electrical?

My 1967 AS Caravel is a total gut job. None of the converters or batteries were still present when I bought it - so I'm starting fresh. I have pulled all of the alumaflex wiring. I intend to have air conditioning, a refrigerator, microwave, LED lights and a few outlets, but no cook top or oven. After reading the Forums I like the Magnum MMS1012 - but am not clear on what else I need?! I will have an electrician do the work, but I think these are specialty items and will need to be ordered (in Oklahoma City). Thanks!
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Old 07-13-2015, 09:58 PM   #2
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1967 22' Safari
Oklahoma City , Oklahoma
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Hey mmeans, any info you learn, please let me know. I just purchased a 67 safari and will need to redo all the electric, to match your specs almost exactly.
Since we're both in OKC, we can meet up sometime.
Good luck!
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:08 AM   #3
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1967 17' Caravel
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I will let you know if anyone posts. I would love to meet - I'm near Penn Sq Mall.
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:18 AM   #4
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I have done it

I have done it and am doing it again soon. PM me and we can discuss. I am located just south of Ardmore.
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:22 PM   #5
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1963 22' Safari
Vail , Arizona
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Rewiring

That is where I started last year. I did a complete teardown. New axle, recoated the frame, on way to new floor, new plumbing, and then get to put the shell back on. Quite an adventure.
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Old 07-14-2015, 09:40 PM   #6
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1967 17' Caravel
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Thank you! I'm a little overwhelmed! I went to Lewis RVs in OKC and they weren't any help at all. If you could point me in the right direction I would be forever grateful!!
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:38 AM   #7
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1963 22' Safari
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mmeans
If you are doing the "complete" electrical replacement, are you planning on doing the DC part as well (brake wiring, tail lights, running lights, etc.)?
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:47 PM   #8
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1968 24' Tradewind
1967 17' Caravel
Northborough , Massachusetts
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Start with the Wiring diagram in the manual.

Study it well in order to understand what needs to be pre-wired into the shell. Its quite a bit of wiring. Then you need to make adjustments to bring your trailer up to snuff for today's style of camping. Tv, Wi-Fi, internet, etc will at least need to be upgraded or added. I'm adding USB charging ports in a few useful areas. Then there's questions about a backup camera, security system, tire monitors, CB, Ham, etc. Plan well and it will go smoother. We tucked "extras" into useful places so that we could make some adjustments later.
These renovations take time and what you wanted when you started and when you are finished can be quite different depending upon some of the alternate decisions you make along the way. Starting with a previously gutted trailer, I do not envy you... its a lot more work and thought to get it right. There's a lot you don't know that can bite you and it is likely to be frustrating and expensive to "roll your own". Maybe on the second try it would be easier, but from the get-go I personally wouldn't start there.
I do wish you the best of luck though!

One of these days I'm going to post the project I took on and finally am finishing. It will take about a hundred or so pictures to minimally take someone through the de-construction and re-construction process with enough detail to give you an idea of what you are up against.
I have about 2000 hrs and $25K invested into mine and the outside still needs plenty of attention. It is not a project for the faint of heart or for someone that doesn't have plenty of skills in their pocket.

Most would be much better off to buy a decent used one and enjoy it. Restoration is a labor of love...and can switch into something you no longer wish to do if you don't manage it comfortably. Set goals but not deadlines... because you can achieve the goals, but deadlines will take the fun out of it.
We started ours 10 years ago... and the next is waiting to be started when this is ready to be used.

Chuck
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Old 07-16-2015, 06:07 AM   #9
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1967 17' Caravel
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That part seemed fine, so I left it as it was. Do you think I should redo it too?
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Old 07-16-2015, 10:56 PM   #10
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1968 24' Tradewind
1967 17' Caravel
Northborough , Massachusetts
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The 12v system is just as important as the 110v one, even more so if you plan to do a lot of "Boondocking". As an Airstreamer boondocking is an option that many enjoy, but won't be much fun if your 12v system is not operating correctly. There are actually 2 different 12v systems. The one for your 12v appliances such as the fan in the propane heater, the fans in the various vents, the safety valves in the water heater and fridge, and all of the internal lighting. The other 12v system is the running lights, brake lights, backup lights and turn signals. There is also a connection to your vehicle battery when the plug is connected to the vehicle... and you can drain both systems down if you leave it plugged in... or alternately drain your trailer battery if the connector is left out in the weather to develop a "energy leak", which will drain your battery as well as destroy your connector by dissolving the metal bits of it.
All of those wires need to be carefully inspected for "rubbing", rodent damage and corrosion while they are exposed... any that are even suspect for damage should be replaced. With my trailer the rodent smell even penetrated the wire insulation such that I had to rip it all out to get rid of the smell. Very few original ones remain. None of the original 110v system remains except for the boxes. I replaced all of the original 14 gauge wire
with 12 gauge for an added safety margin... and all copper instead of aluminum. All feed plumbing was replaced with pex, all drain plumbing with the black plastic designed for mobile applications. Flooring was marine grade plywood with fiberglass over the outside foot to force any leaks to puddle inside rather to saturate the wood and hide.
All of the fiberglass was refinished with an over sprayed gel coat. All wood inside was completely rebuilt and refinished or replaced and refinished to look like original. The inside vinyl coated aluminum skin was spray painted over with a special paint specifically for painting over vinyl. It looks great and wears better than the original. It even has the original textured surface. All laminates were used as templates for new 100% wood or corian surfaces. One exception was the bathroom where we kept the original aqua laminates. The bathroom door laminates were not salvageable so a new door is being constructed using hardwood and lexan panels to match well with the rest of the interior decorum. I put a lot of effort into restoring the original furniture to look like it did when it was first made. I replaced all door hardware with new but virtually identical replacements. I replaced all cheap rv drawer slides and glides with much more expensive furniture grade ones. All of the plastic trays are being replaced with decorative alternatives made of woven wood/wicker/grass, leather, or stiff backed cloth. The original funky covers for these areas are not being reused as we want the nice alternatives we picked to show and add a personal touch and more visual depth. We spent way too much time and effort to have it look or be "cheap". When its finished I want to enjoy it not continue to futz with it.

Hopefully there a few tidbits you can use in that long winded reply.

Chuck
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