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Old 07-08-2013, 11:17 AM   #15
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1993 34' Excella
York , South Carolina
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Tim, keep the Tundra for the daily stuff, get something else to tow with.

John
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:53 AM   #16
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1964 26' Overlander
Gold Bar , Washington
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Originally Posted by Tim Watts View Post
Don't have a rig yet-have to trade in my Tundra for a 3/4 ton, probably with for a diesel.
We tow our 64 Overlander with our 85 diesel Suburban. It's slow going up hills, but it also doesn't have turbo like the new diesels have. But since we get better fuel milage than a newer diesel, even going up those hills, it's not too bad of a trade off.
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1964 Overlander pulled by 1985 diesel Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4 w/ 4" lift & 35" tires.
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:59 AM   #17
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1964 26' Overlander
Gold Bar , Washington
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Originally Posted by Tim Watts View Post
I have an older Tundra, 4.7 liter, hate to give it up, its been a great truck for my needs.

Look for an older diesel rig. I don't know much about other makes, I'm a real big Chevy gal, but I do know that any of the 3/4 ton Chevy diesels will get you there. Though without turbo it'll be slow up hills, but you will make it without any issues. The 3/4 diesels have a the largest breaking system and can stop about anything. We have moved over 15,000 lbs (only rated for 8,000 though) with my diesel, got 18 mpg, and stopped all that weight and found out the rear breaks weren't working. She did great though. I wouldn't trade her for anything. All that was done on a really tired 6.2 diesel that we later found out had a cracked cyclinder and the tranny was really tired too. We replaced the motor that we took from our diesel pickup and had the tranny rebuilt to our needs (lifted, 4x4, towing highway speeds) and it does even better.
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1964 Overlander pulled by 1985 diesel Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4 w/ 4" lift & 35" tires.
Also: 2008 Sebring convertible; Camaros: 83 Z28, 78 Z28, 78 (7 yr olds); Trucks: 67 Suburban, 63 Chevy 1/2 ton (10 yr olds), 60 GMC 305 v6
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:17 PM   #18
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1992 34' Limited
Grand Island , Nebraska
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Tim,

I sent you an Email RE Univolt, then noticed this thread and the exchange about TVs. Because I've reached 78 years and I felt it wise for me and others on the road that I tow no longer, I sold my 34' Limited. I delivered it to the new owners in Estes Park, CO two weeks ago so I've ended a thirty year Airstream era. Sad, but the right thing to do.

A few years ago I wrote the following opinion about tow vehicles. Here it is for what it may be worth to you. Bear in mind that the majority of my towing was in mountainous areas where there was no substitute for power (Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, etc.).

I've pulled my two Airstreams with four pickups, two of them diesels. The old Chevy 6.2L was a workhorse but didn't have much power. My present truck is an old 1996 Dodge diesel with a manual transmission. I'm totally sold on the Cummins diesel because of the great way it handles my Airstream and for the wonderful fuel economy (I'd be happy to respond to questions about details). What pickup you should buy depends on some things about you.
1) Will you buy new or used? There are issues with every vehicle that is made so when buying used it is necessary to do a little research to find some of these problems with a truck you may be interested in. For example, the older series of Dodge automatics had some transmission issues, especially those with the Cummins diesel. Some of the problems were owner caused (pulling big hills in overdrive being one cause), but there did seem to be design problems. There are aftermarket cures that take care of the problems and some used trucks may have had the upgrade. I'd want to make sure it had been addressed or else I'd want to get a good enough deal that I could make the upgrade when needed. Another example is the way above average problems with the earlier Ford 6.0 diesels. GM Duramax has some issues as well. It doesn't mean any of these are a bad deal, but one should go into a purchase fore-warned and have the vehicle thoroughly checked over. Whether gas or diesel, run a Carfax report and have a trusted mechanic check it out thoroughly. If you buy new at least you have the relative safety of a factory warranty.
2) Do you prefer manual or automatic? I mentioned the Dodge issues with automatics, but other brands may have issues as well. There may be fewer issues with the manuals but nothing is perfect, no matter what the die-hard fans of a particular brand may say! I preferred the manual but when I bought it (used) my left knee was lame and I wasn't sure I could operate the clutch, especially backing up. I've had zero problems with the knee issues and find it easier to back up than my previous automatics.
3) Can you tolerate the higher noise level of a diesel engine? I absolutely love my Cummins, but my old twelve valve engine is noisy. All the new diesels are more quiet than older ones, but compared to gassers they are still noisy! All modern vehicles are obscenely expensive to repair, but diesels tend to be more so. Of course, the good ones won't need many repairs. Also, diesels hold more oil so oil changes will be more expensive.
If I needed a new truck and money was no issue I'd buy a Dodge Cummins quad-cab. However, If God keeps blessing my old '96 Dodge and it keeps going, it may be my final truck! Yes, I like it that much.


Over the years there has been some talk on this site about possible trailer damage if one tows with a vehicle that has a suspension system that is too stiff. You might want to research this a bit before you buy.



Gene
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