Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-28-2006, 11:50 AM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
2006 16' International CCD
Sun Valley , Idaho
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 66
Lightning Question

While camping at Three Island St. Pk. the other night out of Glenns Ferry,Id.
we had a little lightning and the question came up as what one would do in
a major storm. Do you unplug from the elactrods? Y'all down south must have
some major events at times so what do you do? Thanks for your replies.
Betty
__________________

__________________
Bettymsb@msn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2006, 03:08 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
rseagle's Avatar
 
2004 22' International CCD
Spotsylvania , Virginia
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 663
Images: 33
If I'm hooked up to 30 Amp service, I'll unplug it during the storm.
__________________

__________________
Bob
---------------
"THE BAUXITE BUNGALOW"
2004 22' CCD
1997 F-150
TAC VA-12
AIR# 4749
ex WBCCI# 1430
rseagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2006, 05:26 PM   #3
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
I think it's best to stay inside, unless there is a chance of high winds or flooding. The airstream forms a 'Faraday cage' that protects you from lightning.

Whether to unplug the power, I don't know. The ground wire might provide some protection, but it isn't as heavy as the ground in your house. And you don't know how well grounded the ground is.
__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2006, 06:11 PM   #4
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
This subject has come up quite a bit lately, and the consensus seems to be to leave the coach plugged in, but unplug any electronics you have inside, and not to hang on to the inner skin of the coach.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2006, 09:25 PM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
steelbird312's Avatar
 
1956 22' Safari
2000 39' Land Yacht XL Diesel w/slide
Crossville , Tennessee
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 413
Images: 11
Seems to me the easiest yet most responsible thing is to get an electrical protector, have it installed, and then you will forget it is there, all the while it is extremely busy protecting your unit from lightening, bad wiring at campgrounds, low or high voltage, surges, etc.
http://www.progressiveindustries.net/EMSHW30C.asp

This unit saves much grief!
No, I'm not affiliated, but somehow, I wish I were-think about the possiblities!
__________________
steelbird312
2000 390 Landyacht XL
1989 29' Excella
WBCCI #6673 jerry Hodge
Have no intention of arriving at the grave safely, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand,throttle in the other, totally worn out and screaming
"WOO HOO, WHAT A RIDE!"
steelbird312 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2006, 11:25 AM   #6
Ready-to-Travel
 
pmclemore's Avatar

 
2012 30' International
Walkerton , Virginia
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,494
Thinking of lightning and grounds, and such - reminds me that I usually use several 2x6 blocks under my front jack to make the setup go quicker. You know, to keep from having to run the jack all the way down to the ground.

However, doing that would take away what would seem to be a natural ground. Would the absence of a metal jack foot contacting the ground be missed in the event of a strike?

Thanks - Pat.
__________________
pmclemore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2006, 04:01 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
SilverRanger's Avatar
 
2005 19' Safari
1968 24' Tradewind
Rural , Delaware
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,475
Couldn't the leveling jacks serve the same purpose as a ground?
__________________
SilverRanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 11:21 AM   #8
Ready-to-Travel
 
pmclemore's Avatar

 
2012 30' International
Walkerton , Virginia
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,494
I suppose so, but my "leveling" jacks are actually stabilizers, as yours are likely to be also. Plus, they have such a small footprint, I place 2x6 blocks under them, also.

Does the group think we need to have metal-to-ground contact?
__________________
pmclemore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 02:38 PM   #9
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmclemore
Does the group think we need to have metal-to-ground contact?
Don't know.

Ever feel that 'tingling' sensation just before lightning strikes?

That's the lightning bolt looking for a leader. Do you want to reduce the potential between yourself and ground? Make yourself a better target?

I'd say the better insulated you are, the better. Unplug the power cord. Isolate yourself from ground. Stay in the trailer. Keep away from tall 'targets'.

How many people have been killed sitting inside their ungrounded cars? Not very many.
__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 02:49 PM   #10
Site Team
 
azflycaster's Avatar
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Dewey , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 12,127
Images: 62
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane
Don't know.

Ever feel that 'tingling' sensation just before lightning strikes?

That's the lightning bolt looking for a leader. Do you want to reduce the potential between yourself and ground? Make yourself a better target?

I'd say the better insulated you are, the better. Unplug the power cord. Isolate yourself from ground. Stay in the trailer. Keep away from tall 'targets'.

How many people have been killed sitting inside their ungrounded cars? Not very many.
I agree. If you are in your trailer and it is struck, being grounded may not save your life. The temperture of a lightning bolt can reach 50,000 degrees F. The melting point of Alumunum is 1220 degrees F.
__________________

Richard

Wally Byam Airstream Club 7513
azflycaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 04:04 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
53flyingcloud's Avatar
 
1984 29' Sovereign
Savannah , Missouri
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 3,458
Images: 17
Blog Entries: 1
Thumbs up That's a smart move...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rseagle
If I'm hooked up to 30 Amp service, I'll unplug it during the storm.
If you don't have an isolator wired into your system, I'd say that's the smartest move..Friend of mine in the next town over (Bedford,NH) has one. Now, for the life of me..I haven't figured out why I haven't done the same yet...
__________________
WBCCI 5292 AIR 807
NEU #64
New England Unit
53flyingcloud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 04:19 PM   #12
Huh?
 
Ultradog's Avatar
 
1975 27' Overlander
Twin Cities , Minnesota
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 494
Images: 8
There's an old saying that goes something like:
"He who fears lightning must have a guilty conscience."

I don't think it much matters whether your trailer is grounded or not.
If the lightning can jump the thousands of feet from the clouds to the ground it can surely jump from the trailer to the ground.
As OverLander63 mentioned you might unplug your electronic gear.
If it were me though I'd just cozy up to my sweetheart.
Try to make her think all that crashing and thunder and lightning was from us and not the storm.
__________________
Ultradog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 05:13 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
RoadKingMoe's Avatar
 
2001 34' Limited
The State of , Ohio
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 1,605
Images: 23
I'm tempted to write many paragraphs about this, but I think Ultradog said it pretty well in few words. And I don't unplug shorepower either.
__________________
Maurice
RoadKingMoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 09:53 PM   #14
3 Rivet Member
 
Barkingdogg's Avatar
 
Vintage Kin Owner
Newcastle , Oklahoma
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 128
I think this is like being in a car or an airplane. The metal cage carries the electricity around you & since you are not grounded (personally) it is not carried through your body. f
the following is from the National Lightinig Saftey Institue
Barkingdogg
Some general recommendations include:
  1. Personal Safety Issues: Reported incidents and related injuries make it clear that a person inside a fully enclosed metal vehicle must not be touching metallic objects referenced to the outside of the car. Door and window handles, radio dials, CB microphones, gearshifts, steering wheels and other inside-to-outside metal objects should be left alone during close-in lightning events. We suggest pulling off to the side of the road in a safe manner, turning on the emergency blinkers, turning off the engine, putting one's hands in one's lap, and waiting out the storm.
  2. Heavy Equipment: Backhoes, bulldozers, loaders, graders, scrapers, mowers, etc. which employ an enclosed rollover systems canopy (ROPS) are safe in nearby electrical storms. The operator should shut down the equipment, close the doors, and sit with hands in lap, waiting out the storm. In no circumstances, during close-in lightning, should the operator attempt to step off the equipment to ground in an attempt to find another shelter. Very dangerous Step Voltage and Touch Voltage situations are created when a "dual pathway to ground" is created. Lightning voltages will attempt to equalize themselves, and they may go through a person in order to do so.
    Smaller equipment without ROPS is not safe. Small riding mowers, golf cars, utility wagons are examples. Rubber tires provide zero safety from lightning. After all, lightning has traveled for miles through the sky: four or five inches of rubber is no insulation whatsoever. People should safely abandon this machinery and get into a safe shelter.
  3. School buses. Metal buses are good Faraday Cages. Make sure all windows are closed and the "hands on laps" rule is observed. Pull over and wait out the storm.
  4. Damage. Reported damage to vehicles includes pitting, arcing, burning on both exterior and interior places. See the below photographs, courtesy of Mr. Brown, of his Jeep Cherokee which was struck by lightning. Cases have been reported of total destruction of vehicle wiring, and associated electrical and electronic systems. Cases from police departments report bad burns to the hands and mouth where officers were using radio microphones when their vehicles were struck. Cases describe total blow-out of all four tires in passenger cars. A video in our NLSI library shows a station wagon being struck by lightning in a heavy rain storm, with no damage whatsoever occurring.
__________________

__________________
Barkingdogg is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Skylight part question ColtSAA45 Roof Vents, Skylights & Fans 3 04-22-2004 09:05 PM
Power Jack Question 68 Suburban Jacks, Stabilizers, Lifting and Leveling 3 10-11-2002 07:05 PM
Floor support question jeanarlene Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 1 10-11-2002 11:26 AM
Battery Dead/Power jack question jcanavera Jacks, Stabilizers, Lifting and Leveling 34 08-16-2002 02:51 PM
Tire sizing question casarodante Tires 5 07-02-2002 11:19 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.