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Old 03-17-2015, 06:45 PM   #1
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Question Heavy stiff shore power cords

Where can you find a power cord for my 2015 Intl Serenity 28 that is more flexible and not so heavy?
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Old 03-17-2015, 07:08 PM   #2
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Where can you find a power cord for my 2015 Intl Serenity 28 that is more flexible and not so heavy?
Probably not anywhere. You need a certain size of cord to carry the current, and that cord needs a certain amount of insulation.

I'll use an extreme example to illustrate my point. Say you wanted to jump-start your car. You'd use a pair of jumper cables, right? You wouldn't use a regular household extension cord with alligator clips spliced on the ends. The extension cord would overheat and melt the insulation, and probably electrocute you.

The same sort of thing applies with shore power cables. The size of the shore power cable is pretty much standardized, same way that jumper cables are pretty well standardized. All 30amp shore power cables will be about the same as each other. All 50amp shore power cables will be about the same as each other. Because that's the size they need to be to safely handle the load.

The cord will get a little bit more flexible the more you use it. Not much, but some. But it will never get lighter, and that's just the way life is.

Now if you had an older Airstream, I'd say you have a chance, because insulation has improved over the years, even though copper wire is still the same old copper wire it always has been. But on a new Airstream, you've probably got pretty recent insulation design already.
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Old 03-17-2015, 07:12 PM   #3
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Where can you find a power cord for my 2015 Intl Serenity 28 that is more flexible and not so heavy?
30 amp or 50 amp?
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:07 PM   #4
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heavy stiff power cords

If you want to make up the ends of the cord yourself. Go to a big box store and look for "SO" cord.
#6 2 conductor with ground for 50 amp
#10 2 conductor with ground for 30 amp
SO cord is very flexible and rated for the voltage required.
There will be 1 black conductor for the hot leg. 1 white conductor for the neutral. 1 green conductor for the ground.
Obviously the 50 amp cord will weigh more per foot than the 30 amp cord.


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Old 03-17-2015, 08:08 PM   #5
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you can't reduce the weight as that is a function of the current rating.

You can make your own using a more flexible SO cord from an electrical supply house but the cost of the ends and the cord will be over a $100.00.

Only camp in warm weather and it will be fine.
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:16 PM   #6
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50 amp requires 6/3 with ground, as there are 2 hot legs in a standard RV 50 amp service connecting into a split breaker box. Black and red are hot, white is neutral and green (or bare copper, which is NOT preferred) is ground.
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:48 PM   #7
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Rubber insulated cord is much more flexible than the more common plastic (vinyl maybe) insulation which is stiff, especially when cold. You can get it sometimes at places like Home Depot, but it will not be cheap. And you need the plug end and maybe the other end if you have a connection on the side of your trailer. It will not be any lighter in weight, only more flexible at all temps. You would need #10/3 with ground (3 wires, hot, neutral and ground) for a 30 amp line and # 6/4 (two hots, one neutral, one ground) for a 50 amp service.
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:56 PM   #8
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I used "SOOW" cable in the sizes mention above by Lewster and idroba...

Don't know how long the link will be up but found this:
SOOW Cord SOOW Cable (600V) | Wire & Cable To Go

The letters SOOW denote particular properties of the cable:
S for Service
OO for Oil-resistant insulation and Oil-resistant jacket
W for Weather and Water resistance.
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Old 03-18-2015, 09:47 AM   #9
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10/3 with ground is a 4 wire cable as I recall. 1 black; 1 red; 1 white; 1 green.
Only 3 wires are required for 30 amp service.
Not owning a coach with 50 amp service, I was under the impression that it was still a 120 volt service with a higher current carrying capacity. Is this the wrong impression?
I think there are some larger coaches that use 240 volt service. Which would require a 4 wire cable. With 2 hot legs.


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Old 03-18-2015, 10:02 AM   #10
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Not owning a coach with 50 amp service, I was under the impression that it was still a 120 volt service with a higher current carrying capacity. Is this the wrong impression?
Number of wires has nothing to do with voltage, only with phases. Single-phase service is three wires. Three-phase service is four wires. Even at 120v.
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Old 03-18-2015, 10:38 AM   #11
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240 volt service is still single phase.
There are multiple types of 3 phase service. Two of the most common types are Delta and Wye.
Delta can been strictly 3 wire with 3 hot legs or 4 wire with 3 hot legs and a "stinger" for the neutral.
Wye is a 4 wire system with 3 hot legs and a center tapped neutral.
You will not find a power pedestal in a camp ground with more than single phase power.


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Old 03-18-2015, 11:04 AM   #12
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Wow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Boyscout View Post
Where can you find a power cord for my 2015 Intl Serenity 28 that is more flexible and not so heavy?
Right here.

Amazon.com: ParkPower by Marinco 124ARV-25 RV Electrical Power Cordset (50-amp 125/250-Volt Receptacle with 30-Amp 125-Volt RV Straight Blade Plug, 25-Feet): Sports & Outdoors

I have one and use it often. It is a 30a cord, which makes it lighter and much easier to handle than the stock 50a cord. It works fine as long as you don't run both air conditioners at once or run more than two high-power appliances at once (either air conditioner, electric water heater, microwave).

I still carry my stock 50a cord and use it when appropriate.
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:16 AM   #13
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My husband made a 100 ft - 30 amp. I can barely even pick it up!
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:31 AM   #14
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For those of you geeking out on this thread, some clarifications.

Flexible cord (type SOOW, SJOOW and so on) does not come in "with ground" or "without ground" forms. The ground wire is part of the conductor count. So 10/3 will have two current-carrying conductors (a black one for "hot" and a white one for "neutral") and one (green) ground conductor.

The "with ground" nomenclature is only used on building wiring -- type UF, type NM, and so on.

30a RV service requires 10 gauge cable with hot, neutral, and ground wires, so 10/3 is the applicable designation.

50a RV service officially requires 6 gauge cable with two hot, one neutral, and one ground wire, so 6/4 is the applicable designation.

All RV service is single phase.

One possibility for making the cable more manageable is to use 8 gauge cable, which has a capacity of 40 amps per leg. You would have to make up your own cable set if doing this, and it would be prudent to reduce the main breaker size from 50 amps to 40 amps. It is nearly impossible to exceed a 40 amp draw on either of the two hot legs, with an Airstream, while on 50a service.
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