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Old 08-31-2015, 02:39 PM   #15
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No!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethowens View Post
house outlet - 20 amps.

good for a few lights and such....No A/C...NO MICROWAVE

you want to do all that - go purchase some (#6 best) or #8 gauge stranded wire,
makeup a cord that you could plug into the clothes dryer outlet...or suitable large
amperage outlet(if available).

Safety - get an Electrician to help you.
Clothes dryer outlets are 240 volts. No! Don't plug your Airstream into one of those, no matter how big the extension cord.
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Old 08-31-2015, 03:04 PM   #16
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30A house circuit breaker via 10-2 w/ ground via conduit to stub for trailer. One 30A outlet for trailer service or you could wire a sub panel for an additional 15-20A outlet. It's what I built for mine and works flawlessly.
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Old 08-31-2015, 03:39 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxite View Post
AMPS is like GALLONS of water. VOLTS is like PRESSURE (PSI).
Volts multiplied by Amps equals WATTS (which is the ability to perform Work, similar to 10 gallons per minute at 50 psi.)
AMPS is more like GALLONS per SECOND. COULOMBs are more like GALLONS. An AMP-HOUR (used in battery specs) is 3600 COULOMBs.
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Old 08-31-2015, 06:30 PM   #18
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Just because an electrician is in a Union or even licensed doesn't mean he/she knows anything about providing power to your coach.
Be sure the person you hire knows precisely what is needed. Otherwise there could be severe damage to your coach.


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Old 08-31-2015, 08:03 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimiandrews View Post
Clothes dryer outlets are 240 volts. No! Don't plug your Airstream into one of those, no matter how big the extension cord.
In kennethowens defence, you can do this, if you REALLY understand what you're doing. You just need to make sure that you have connected to only one of the hot wires, along with the neutral and ground. If you're going to go to that much trouble you might as well install a proper 30 amp, 120 volt outlet.
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:11 PM   #20
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One additional point relative to the original post: coiling an extension cord up is a good way to cause it to overheat. Cord reels are good for that, too.
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:47 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidsonOverlander View Post
In kennethowens defence, you can do this, if you REALLY understand what you're doing. You just need to make sure that you have connected to only one of the hot wires, along with the neutral and ground. If you're going to go to that much trouble you might as well install a proper 30 amp, 120 volt outlet.
Amen.
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Old 09-01-2015, 08:49 AM   #22
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NEVER plug a 30 amp 120Vac service trailer into a clothes dryer power outlet as that is a 240 VAC outlet. That connection would do major damage to all the trailer appliances like the battery charger, the air conditioner and the water heater. It could even damage the 12Vdc appliances.

Airstream trailers with 50 amp service actually connect to 240Vac outlets.
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Old 09-01-2015, 10:19 AM   #23
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I'm not sure how you would plug a 30 amp 120Vac trailer cord into a clothes dryer outlet as the prongs would not fit and there isn't an adapter made for this connection.
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Old 09-01-2015, 10:51 AM   #24
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I'm not sure how you would plug a 30 amp 120Vac trailer cord into a clothes dryer outlet as the prongs would not fit and there isn't an adapter made for this connection.
It would be easy enough to make your own "dog bone" adapter with a dryer plug, an in-line 30 A RV socket, and a short length of cable. As someone said, if you are plugging into your home dryer outlet you might as well just install a permanent 30 A RV outlet. If you are plugging into someone else's dryer outlet for a short stay then the adapter might make sense.

IMHO, whoever decided to call a 120V, 30 A RV connection a "30 Amp" connection and then call a 240 V, 50 A RV connection a "50 Amp" connection did everyone a considerable disservice. The fact that one is 120 V and the other is 240 V is rather significant!
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Old 09-01-2015, 11:06 AM   #25
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It would be easy enough to make your own "dog bone" adapter with a dryer plug, an in-line 30 A RV socket, and a short length of cable. As someone said, if you are plugging into your home dryer outlet you might as well just install a permanent 30 A RV outlet. If you are plugging into someone else's dryer outlet for a short stay then the adapter might make sense.

IMHO, whoever decided to call a 120V, 30 A RV connection a "30 Amp" connection and then call a 240 V, 50 A RV connection a "50 Amp" connection did everyone a considerable disservice. The fact that one is 120 V and the other is 240 V is rather significant!
It's not really that easy. If you have a modern (4 wire) clothes dryer outlet you would need to figure out where the extra wire goes.

If its an older (3 wire) outlet, then you would need to ignore the wire color differences (black to black, green to bare, red to white??). If you're that much a novice you shouldn't be messing with electicrity anyway.
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Old 09-01-2015, 12:20 PM   #26
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Not disputing the above advice...

You shouldn't have coiled your extension cord neatly. It can cause a few problems, heat being one of them, and not just because all the heat is in a localized area. It should be in a large messy pile.

Perhaps Protag can explain it better than I can. I just know from experience working on large stage shows.

Leaving it in the sun doesn't help, especially on a hot day. ANDůmany of the orange extension cords are only 16 gauge.

When running AC long distances, we used 8 or 10 gauge wire that needed two guys to carry.
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Old 09-01-2015, 01:28 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane View Post
It's not really that easy. If you have a modern (4 wire) clothes dryer outlet you would need to figure out where the extra wire goes.

If its an older (3 wire) outlet, then you would need to ignore the wire color differences (black to black, green to bare, red to white??). If you're that much a novice you shouldn't be messing with electicrity anyway.
Perhaps an electrician will correct me, but it's actually the other way around. If you have a modern 4-wire dryer outlet you have 2 hot wires (red and black, each with 120 volts to provide the 240 volts), a neutral wire and a ground. You would use one of the hot wires, the neutral, and the ground to create a connection that would be 120 volts.

If it's an older 3-wire outlet then it wouldn't work because you don't have a neutral wire. A neutral wire is not required for many 240 volt applications. If you went black to black, green to bare, red to white you would have a 30 amp 240 volt supply.
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Old 09-01-2015, 01:42 PM   #28
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Most home outlets are not capable of running the type of power you need. Most outlets have been wired using cheap Chinese receptacles that would fry if you even tried to run 12 amps out of it for an extended time. You really need to understand the construction of these outlets to know the difference. Buy a Hubbell first of. Then make sure the wires are wired around the screws and don't poke them into the back as your electrician did when he wired your house.

All breakers are designed to trip at 80% of full load current. That means that a 15 amp breaker will trip at 12 amps and a 30 amps breaker at 24 amps. If they are Square D breakers you can be guaranteed that they will trip faster than any other breaker on the market due to their design.

Do what was suggested above and get one dedicated outlet wired properly if you want to run your AC. It's cheaper than replacing your AC unit.
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