Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-31-2014, 08:44 PM   #29
2 Rivet Member
 
PSYS's Avatar
 
APPLETON , Wisconsin
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvestysly View Post

Danielle and I can certainly relate to your lament. While we both had a certain level of disdain for the working world I don't think our case(s) were quite a bad as yours and we wish you and your spouse the best in your endeavors. The life of RVing is full of challenges and as Matt indicated above having a sense of a purpose will likely lead to a much more satisfying RV experience.

There are lots of volunteering opportunities out there. Danielle and I are not full-timing but we take time to travel on extended trips up to a few months now and then. As much as we like the travel aspect of our journeys it's the volunteering we do along the way that makes the time even more special.

Identify your core pursuits and decide where that fits into your RVing life - giving back to others is a significant component of living a life that is happy, wild and free!
Awesome info and much appreciated!

I can most certainly guarantee that I'd find some sort of purpose while on the road.

For my own shameless self-promotion, one of the things that I love doing are random acts of kindness. I do a lot of art (when I can) and actually own and operate the Free Art Friday - WISCONSIN Facebook page. Every week, I paint a new piece of art and then leave it on the streets of my community every Friday for a stranger to find, take home and love.

I've now organized FLOOD the streets with ART! (part II) which is essentially the largest free art drop in the world coordinated by yours truly. I'm asking every artist and creator to leave a piece of art somewhere within their community as a random act of kindness. This would all take place on the one day of the year that matters most... 11/28/2014 a.k.a BLACK FRIDAY. Why ?

The day before here in America, we celebrate Thanksgiving. We sit around with friends, family members and loved ones and give thanks for everything we have in our lives... and then? We rush out in the wee hours of the morning and push, shove and act barbaric just so we can get a four dollar toaster. That seems awfully silly.

I did this event last year on Black Friday and had 2,687 artists partake leaving one or more pieces of art on the streets of their community. Those artists were in all 50 states, 20+ different countries and every continent on our planet (including Antarctica)

This year, I've already got nearly 4,000 artists on board, ready to pounce and drop free art on the streets this Black Friday!

Purpose? ...yeah, I can think of a few I'd find on the road.

https://www.facebook.com/events/649474495168252/
__________________

__________________
- Scott.
http://www.scottwong.net
PSYS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2014, 09:09 PM   #30
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 30' Classic
Homosassa , Florida
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 452
Enjoy whatever you are doing. If you decide to full time it and travel, make the most out of whatever time you have. I've seen lots of people spend their "golden years" saying I wish I had done this or that. Best wishes with your decision.
__________________

__________________
Tater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2014, 09:14 PM   #31
2 Rivet Member
 
2014 Interstate Ext. Coach
Ocean City , Maryland
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 56
I was forty once and felt the same as you, most jobs have their up's and downs and all professions require long and argous hours. The grass always looks greener and rarely is. Think in through.

Joe
__________________
MeandMB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2014, 09:48 PM   #32
Rivet Master
 
aftermath's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Spokane , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,133
Midlife Crisis?

PSYS, newbie

I think there are a couple of things we as a society tell our young people that have proven to be complete lies and these have caused much heartache and tragedy along the way.

One is "you can be anything you want." Well, that is simply not true. No matter how hard I would try, I lack the strength, hand eye coordination and dexterity to be a professional golfer.

Another one is that we should do what we "love." Well, I doubt that many of us Love our work 24/7 as you are referring to in this quote.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSYS View Post
...
Do you love what you do? And not only do you love what you do, but you love it so much that there is absolutely nothing else in the world you'd rather be doing than working full-time at your current place of employment. And on a scale of 1 to 10... 1 being you tolerate your job and 10 being you want to burn the place to the ground, where do you fit in?

...I've not come across one single individual as of yet (and I've asked 64 people as of today over the course of the last 2 weeks) who has given me a solid "YES". Not a "Yes, BUT..." This is a black & white question from my perspective. You don't get a "YES, but..." You don't get a "Sometimes..." You either get "YES" or "NO". For the second part of my question, all of them answered with an "8" or higher except for one "6" and a "7"...
I retired at 58 from a job I really liked. I was a high school math teacher and got a great deal of satisfaction from my effort. By your scale, because I did not Love it 100% of the time I would struggle to give it a score higher than a 2, something must be wrong.

Look, if you don't like your job you really do need to change. I would caution you about over reacting and selling everything and going on the road at the age of 40. While material things lead many astray, the pragmatist in me says that there is a need for some financial security as you move towards your 50s, 60s and 70s. Living in a trailer, seeking part time jobs to help pay for your rental fees and to put some food on the table does not sound like something I would "love" to do.

Someone has suggested that you try this part time to see how it goes before you jump into the deep water. I think that was a great bit of advice. Who knows, as you move around you might find something that you really would love to do, something that can provide some financial security. Best wishes as you negotiate this time in your life.
__________________
aftermath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2014, 09:55 AM   #33
Rivets?
 
nvestysly's Avatar

 
1992 29' Excella
2010 22' Interstate
Van By The River , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,522
I really like the idea of Flood(ing) The Streets With Art. I'm not a Facebook user so I can't "like" it but I've passed the information along to several others.
__________________
Lucius and Danielle
1992 29' Excella Classic
1996 GMC Suburban C2500 7.4L
2005 Chevrolet Suburban K2500 8.1L
Got a cooped-up feeling, gotta get out of town, got those Airstream campin' blues...
nvestysly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2014, 10:28 AM   #34
Rivet Master
 
paiceman's Avatar

 
2017 30' Classic
Upper St Clair , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,434
Images: 1
Scott:

A few suggestions from life's experiences. First and foremost whether you work to retirement age or bag it now do so with NO DEBT. No mortgage, no car loan and no student debt. and NO DEBT on your Airstream of tow vehicle. We worked until 65 with that as a major objective and made it. Also, figure out what you like to do and what you are good at and pursue either getting more training or improving those skill sets. At your age it's going to be tough to "retire" without a significant source of income. Regardless of how inexpensive you think you can live, double it. Trucks break, AS trailers break, things wear out, you must have Health Insurance now etc. Also consider setting up residence in an income tax free state, South Dakota is a good one to look at.

There are a number of books on this subject, get them and read them. We thought of the same thing you are only we also had kids. We decided to stick it out, save, keep physically fit and then at 65 retire with no money concerns, only health and fortunately we have been able to do so. If we had retired at 40 or so, not sure how we would make it financially at 75 or 80 when we could no longer or not easily do the AS bit.

Best of luck, as you stated this is not a rehearsal - its real and no matter what you do there are real consequences.
__________________
SAFE TRAVELS
2017 30' Classic - F350 6.7 Diesel Crew
USAF - Military Training Instructor (TI) - 68-72
paiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2014, 01:36 PM   #35
2 Rivet Member
 
PSYS's Avatar
 
APPLETON , Wisconsin
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by paiceman View Post
Scott:

A few suggestions from life's experiences. First and foremost whether you work to retirement age or bag it now do so with NO DEBT. No mortgage, no car loan and no student debt. and NO DEBT on your Airstream of tow vehicle. We worked until 65 with that as a major objective and made it. Also, figure out what you like to do and what you are good at and pursue either getting more training or improving those skill sets. At your age it's going to be tough to "retire" without a significant source of income. Regardless of how inexpensive you think you can live, double it. Trucks break, AS trailers break, things wear out, you must have Health Insurance now etc. Also consider setting up residence in an income tax free state, South Dakota is a good one to look at.

There are a number of books on this subject, get them and read them. We thought of the same thing you are only we also had kids. We decided to stick it out, save, keep physically fit and then at 65 retire with no money concerns, only health and fortunately we have been able to do so. If we had retired at 40 or so, not sure how we would make it financially at 75 or 80 when we could no longer or not easily do the AS bit.

Best of luck, as you stated this is not a rehearsal - its real and no matter what you do there are real consequences.
Thank you so much!

Jut got several books on the subject coming from Amazon today. Also, I'm definitely not doing this tomorrow. As much as I'd love to, I'm still practical.

In the meantime, I've got my big boy pants on and realized I simply need to make the most of the situation I'm in. That includes putting my nose to the grind, paying everything off and saving.

Thanks to all of you who have replied. I appreciate the support as well as the awesome reality checks.
__________________
- Scott.
http://www.scottwong.net
PSYS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2014, 02:32 PM   #36
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by aftermath View Post
PSYS, newbie

I think there are a couple of things we as a society tell our young people that have proven to be complete lies and these have caused much heartache and tragedy along the way.

One is "you can be anything you want." Well, that is simply not true. No matter how hard I would try, I lack the strength, hand eye coordination and dexterity to be a professional golfer.

Another one is that we should do what we "love." Well, I doubt that many of us Love our work 24/7 as you are referring to in this quote.

I retired at 58 from a job I really liked. I was a high school math teacher and got a great deal of satisfaction from my effort. By your scale, because I did not Love it 100% of the time I would struggle to give it a score higher than a 2, something must be wrong.

Look, if you don't like your job you really do need to change. I would caution you about over reacting and selling everything and going on the road at the age of 40. While material things lead many astray, the pragmatist in me says that there is a need for some financial security as you move towards your 50s, 60s and 70s. Living in a trailer, seeking part time jobs to help pay for your rental fees and to put some food on the table does not sound like something I would "love" to do.

Someone has suggested that you try this part time to see how it goes before you jump into the deep water. I think that was a great bit of advice. Who knows, as you move around you might find something that you really would love to do, something that can provide some financial security. Best wishes as you negotiate this time in your life.
Two outstanding observations, in my opinion.

"You can be anything you want."

Two problems with this.

1) statistics. Want to be US President? You must be born in the US (that eliminates 7B residents of the planet). US citizens then have a 1 in >350M chance at the role and since it is usually occupied for 4-8 years at a time, you have better odds at the lottery (and note your odds of winning the lottery are statistically identical whether or not you play ;-) ). There are literally MILLIONS of kids who - for example - play football dreaming of playing in the NFL and there's about 1500 players a year who actually get that opportunity. Those 1500 are thousands of times better than (and may have had better breaks than) the several millions who think they can play at that level. If one is in that number of the million who really can't - being pissed or bummed that you're not in the NFL is a real waste of cycles....

2) the language we use is horrible. You can't "be" your job. You can DO your job, but you can't BE it. We tend to make the job our identity - this might have been useful centuries ago (it could be helpful in a village without Internet to know that Mr. Schumacher is the guy you see about having your shoes made) but it's a convention that may cause more harm than good. One works for a Fortune 100 company and gets unceremoniously laid off. Is s/he a failure? Is s/he no longer a good human? Has his/her identity actually changed?

So, dear OP - my free advice - worth everything you're paying for it - unless you're independently resourceful, try thinking about liking what you have while you're taking every step you can toward having what you like. I wouldn't recommend staying in a situation you hate outright - but since the vast majority of the population just will not have their imagined dream job, the person who can find meaning and beauty in their work now is well ahead of most of the population.

Or if you legitimately can live off the land for the next 40+ years without needing health care or other significant financial resources - dive on in and God bless!

And FWIW - I'm the guy who fully acknowledges that my absolute worst day camping is 10,000 times better than my best day in the office. While I'm squirreling away some nuts to hasten retirement myself, I'm aware that the condition you describe isn't uncommon so I try my best to make the working world a little better for my team than they might otherwise experience. That itself gives me a sense of purpose and makes the grind that much more tolerable.

Everyone's mileage varies. Really wish you the best of luck.
__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2014, 08:42 PM   #37
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1966 24' Tradewind
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,136
PSYS - Being a hobo isn't the answer, even in an Airstream. It would get terribly boring and depressing pretty quick. It would cost $800 to pull an Airstream to Phoenix. You hate your job. So start your own job. I heard an old saying down in Iowa "don't judge a person by what they have, judge them by what they don't need." I have a farmer friend who needs almost nothing from the outside community. He grows his own, he makes his own, and he sells the excess that he doesn't give to the neighbor. The Amish are the same way.

I agree with earlier posts that helping others is the most satisfying endeavor of all. So assess your skills and passions and seek independence. Maybe teach art at the elementary level. Children are the most positive things! Helping them grow would be very satisfying.

Quit that darn job that you hate now. Never allow yourself to regret the coming day. It's a free country, take action! Search for a new beginning. But I doubt very much that living in an cold leaky Airstream would satisfy you.

David

PS Go to the rescue league and pick out a cute puppy!
__________________
dbj216 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 05:20 AM   #38
2 Rivet Member
 
PSYS's Avatar
 
APPLETON , Wisconsin
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 28



I get it.

Continue going through the days and not living life to the fullest.
Don't buy an Airstream because they're "cold & leaky".
Don't travel or see the U.S. at such a young age otherwise, I'll fail miserably.
And don't be a hobo.

Good grief. I had to look around and make sure which forum I was on.

Any other advice?
__________________
- Scott.
http://www.scottwong.net
PSYS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 06:17 AM   #39
Rivet Master
 
Piggy Bank's Avatar
 
2017 25' Flying Cloud
2015 22' FB Sport
Kansas City , Missouri
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,082
Other advice?

Realize that dreams are important in soothing away the sharp edges of the daily grind.

So enjoy the planning! It's the process.....
__________________

Piggy Bank
Piggy Bank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 06:18 AM   #40
2 Rivet Member
 
PSYS's Avatar
 
APPLETON , Wisconsin
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 28
I love the planning part of it!
__________________
- Scott.
http://www.scottwong.net
PSYS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 06:51 AM   #41
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,566
What dkottum said.

Save, pay off debt, save, find a way to make some $ on the road, save, save, save, perhaps buy a gently used something so you can get out there and test your wings.

We paid off our little house, saved hard for 10 years, and bought our 06 Interstate in April of 07.

6 months later, at 58, we worker-bees took an early retirement from the State of Illinois and never looked back.

The best decision we ever made.

For us, selling our house and becoming full-timers was not an option, as we never wanted to tow anything, have kids/grands, and needed/wanted a home base. We never regretted that, either. It was always grand to be gone, equally grand to come home.

We roamed the country 6-9 months out of the year, depending on the year, our longest trip being 140+ days. Had the absolute time of our lives.

I really suggest you buy a gently used and get yourselves out there. This will feed your need to travel, familiarize you with costs, and give you a good idea of whether you can do without a home base or not.

Good luck, and keep us posted.


Maggie
__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚❤️
Lily&Me is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 07:19 AM   #42
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSYS View Post

I get it.

Continue going through the days and not living life to the fullest.
Don't buy an Airstream because they're "cold & leaky".
Don't travel or see the U.S. at such a young age otherwise, I'll fail miserably.
And don't be a hobo.

Good grief. I had to look around and make sure which forum I was on.

Any other advice?
Are you sure you get it?

Your playback is an interesting distillation which doesn't at all match what I think I've seen this group offer for your consideration.

Since you ask, the only other advice I could offer is that we're all free agents - you can certainly dive straight in and see what you see. You don't need anyone's permission or approval. It might be exactly what you're dreaming about, it might be a nightmare, it might be all of the above - it's really impossible for people not in your shoes to affirm or disaffirm your life choices. That and - when you ask for advice, be open to opinions that might challenge your thinking - otherwise, why ask?

Best of luck whatever you choose to do!
__________________

__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Intro and Question? jonesdp Member Introductions 2 01-07-2006 12:01 PM
New member intro dondogs Member Introductions 7 12-30-2005 02:45 PM
newbie intro cadonnelly Our Community 2 07-04-2003 08:55 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.