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Old 09-06-2009, 04:06 PM   #1
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getting started

Hi! My husband Peter and I bought our first Airstream about a month ago. It's a 19' Flying Cloud, and so far it's been parked in a field next to the Delaware River so Peter has a place to get out of the rain or sleep if he stays late. We've got plans though for our first real trip in October -- a southern loop from PA down to GA, back up through the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay.

For our first trip, I'd appreciate any tips for the kitchen! We've begun to get some basics, but would love to hear from others with experience, especially in a tiny Bambi kitchen.

Also, Peter is wondering if anyone has tried pushing/pulling a 19'er by hand with a wheel on the front jack. He has a garage to store it for the winter but wants to get it as close as possible to a wall.

Thanks! We're looking forward to becoming part of the Airstream community,
Molly
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Old 09-06-2009, 11:29 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad3622 View Post
Hi! My husband Peter and I bought our first Airstream about a month ago. It's a 19' Flying Cloud, and so far it's been parked in a field next to the Delaware River so Peter has a place to get out of the rain or sleep if he stays late. We've got plans though for our first real trip in October -- a southern loop from PA down to GA, back up through the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay.

For our first trip, I'd appreciate any tips for the kitchen! We've begun to get some basics, but would love to hear from others with experience, especially in a tiny Bambi kitchen.

Also, Peter is wondering if anyone has tried pushing/pulling a 19'er by hand with a wheel on the front jack. He has a garage to store it for the winter but wants to get it as close as possible to a wall.

Thanks! We're looking forward to becoming part of the Airstream community,
Molly
Hi, I think all trailer kitchens are small so I say buy good quality cooking pans. I have an eight inch egg pan, a ten inch frying pan, and a two quart sauce pan. Other than that we carry a toaster, coffee maker, and a rice cooker. As for dishes and utensils we have four of each: four bowls, four cups, four dinner plates, four forks, Etc Etc Etc. [just the two of us] I would not try to push your trailer without an electric trailer mover. First, you might dent your new trailer and at 3 to 4 thousand pounds, you don't want it to get away from you or run over you.
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:02 AM   #3
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Some kitchen tips...

First, Welcome!

As for kitchen in the Bambi, depending on if you are dry-camping or have a hook-up. If dry-camping I recommend paper plates and non stick pots, pans and skillets. The reason is because fresh water and gray water tanks will fill quickly if you do a lot of dishes.

Something else that was a real surprise to us is how well the refrigerator and freezer work. Believe it or not we have ice cream cones while we camp.

Also make mental notes of what you end up not using on this trip and then those are probably the things that go out on the next trip. (Like Tacie's rocks and pickledilly in The Long Long Trailer).

Of the pots, pans and skillets, you might want to figure out what will fit on the stove top when you use all three burners at once. (We have a griddle that is large and we can only use a small sauce pan when the griddle is on).

We have a bamboo cutting board that we put on the back of the bench of the table near the sink. It gives us some more work area. This is besides the cutting board that fits over the sink.

I hope this helps a little. If I think of something else I'll let you know.

Randy
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:13 AM   #4
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Photo of Bamboo cutting board

This is what I was trying to explain. It is good for putting booze on too.
Randy
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:40 AM   #5
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Don't try to figure it all out before your first trip. Keep it simple - paper plates, cups, etc. One or two decent pans. One good sharp knife. WalMart has a spice shaker in the camping section that has salt, pepper, and 5 other spices in the space of a big salt shaker. Plan simple meals.

Use the first experience to teach you what you'll need on subsequent trips. Many things aren't needed - example An egg keeper - the carton work fine. I do have a hand can opener - but other than that I try to avoid "single task" tools unless they are very small.

Paula
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:47 AM   #6
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Don't try to figure it all out before your first trip. Keep it simple - paper plates, cups, etc. One or two decent pans. One good sharp knife. WalMart has a spice shaker in the camping section that has salt, pepper, and 5 other spices in the space of a big salt shaker. Plan simple meals.

Use the first experience to teach you what you'll need on subsequent trips. Many things aren't needed - example An egg keeper - the carton work fine. I do have a hand can opener - but other than that I try to avoid "single task" tools unless they are very small.

Paula
Good advice. While everyone here can give you ideas on what to carry, only you will know what works for you and you won't find that out until you start traveling. Also, like a previous comment it depends alot on whether you mostly camp in full service cg's or dry camp.

When you do get ready to start stocking the kitchen, REI is a pretty good source as they carry lightweight pot, pans, plates and utensils that minimize storage space required. MSR and GSI outdoors both carry excellent, lightweight pots and pans (the pots stack inside each other). GSI baked enamel plates and bowls are also very durable and lightweight.

Some other tips we have learned...

When dry camping, wipe your pots, pans and plates with paper towels before washing. That will minimize water usage, keep the gunk out of your grey tanks, is cheaper and much less expensive than using paper plates. (of course, if you do use paper plates then you already have your fire-starting material). We easily go a week or more without having to drain and refil tanks.

A Leatherman tool is invaluable and can replace your need to carry a can opener, scissors, screwdriver, etc.

An Italian espresso maker takes up little space, and makes a great cup of coffee (almost espresso) on the stove. If you make alot of coffee in the morning a French Press of stovetop percolator iks probably best. Then there is "cowboy coffee"; simply put a pot of water on the stove and throw a handful of grounds in it. Once the water boils, turn off the stove and pour in a little cold water - the grounds will settle to the bottom and you have great coffee with a little "love" on the bottom.

There is very little you can't cook on either the stovetop or grill. Since we mostly boondock, we don't carry any electric appliances and have removed most everything that requires 110v current (including TV, microwave, A/C, etc). That may be a bit extreme for most; the point is you don't need much in the way of appliances to have an enjoyable time in the outdoors.

Enjoy your new trailer! jk
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