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Old 12-31-2013, 08:41 AM   #57
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1959 24' Tradewind
collingwood , Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traveluminum View Post
I haven't pulled it enough to know whether the torsion axles are better or not. I have heard different opinions on both. One friend says the original leaf springs are just as good. I was not sure where to find the leaf springs for a tandem, so I went with torsion.
Thanks, that makes perfect sense.

What is that TV? Looks like a Ranger? Is that enough truck, and have you tested it enough? I am looking into a TV so am very curious if I can get a pick up that isn't a V8. Cheers.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:49 AM   #58
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That is my Chevy Colorado, but not our tow vehicle. We tow with a Dodge Ram with the small 4.7 liter. It gets about 11 to 13 mpg towing our 1973 Overlander (4600 pounds empty) and has enough power for most driving. There were a few steep hills in Arkansas that we could have used more power, but we like it. I have heard a lot of good reviews about the Ford ecoboost v6, but they haven't been out long enough to prove endurance. Our last truck was a 2001 Ford 5.4 liter and lasted 250,000 miles, and our son is still driving it.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:54 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by traveluminum View Post
That is my Chevy Colorado, but not our tow vehicle. We tow with a Dodge Ram with the small 4.7 liter. It gets about 11 to 13 mpg towing our 1973 Overlander (4600 pounds empty) and has enough power for most driving. There were a few steep hills in Arkansas that we could have used more power, but we like it. I have heard a lot of good reviews about the Ford ecoboost v6, but they haven't been out long enough to prove endurance. Our last truck was a 2001 Ford 5.4 liter and lasted 250,000 miles, and our son is still driving it.
Yes, I am told a V8 is pretty much the only option, unless I get into specialized hitches.
-m
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:00 AM   #60
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Congrats on getting it home! I'm looking forward to seeing progress on this one.

As you know, I'm doing a recording studio/office resto as well...

Are you going to remove the inner shell? I've removed mine and I'm replacing my original insulation with Reflectix and then a 1.5" - 2" layer of Roxul, which is a fiberglass-like insulation that recording studios use when building. It's supposed to insulate and dampen sound pretty well. I came up with this combo after some extensive research, it may not be the best, but I do hope it will be the most cost effective.

Good luck on the model, I almost wish I could have found one like yours instead of at 31 footer - it's SOOO big - at the same time, I can fit a lot of drumsets in there
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:20 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmlabs View Post
Congrats on getting it home! I'm looking forward to seeing progress on this one.

As you know, I'm doing a recording studio/office resto as well...

Are you going to remove the inner shell? I've removed mine and I'm replacing my original insulation with Reflectix and then a 1.5" - 2" layer of Roxul, which is a fiberglass-like insulation that recording studios use when building. It's supposed to insulate and dampen sound pretty well. I came up with this combo after some extensive research, it may not be the best, but I do hope it will be the most cost effective.

Good luck on the model, I almost wish I could have found one like yours instead of at 31 footer - it's SOOO big - at the same time, I can fit a lot of drumsets in there
Hey thanks for the reply, and yes good luck to you too.
I am just getting going with it. I haven't the room to take the shell off of it, and hope to get by by replacing just the troubled areas of the floor, then perhaps re-wire the running lights. I have a small budget and limited time [new kid] but still want it to be safe. I have had another trailer as a studio [14 ft] and had to stop recording while it rains,... very loud. Once I start getting the thing apart I may change my tune and do it properly by taking all the inner skin out. Sounds like a lot of work.
I do have a quiet generator and will use this studio off grid.

I am curious if my 22' bass drum will fit in the door?! Either way I also have a small jazz kit. No B3 organs though!

Thanks for the tips and may knock on your door for ideas.
Cheers bro
-m
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Old 01-04-2014, 07:37 PM   #62
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Hey folks, just getting going on the 59'.
Gutted the thing and saved templates and any little details I could. Next is the belly pan to see the frame in its entirety.

I am at this point quite convinced that I only need to replace the bow and the stern of the floor [4 feet in]. That said I will know more when I take the belly pan off.
I did go around with a ice pick and apart from a soft spot where the fridge was [can epoxy] I think the floor is otherwise fine.

For anyone who has experience at this I have some questions:

The back frame needs attention, and wonder if it I can hire a welder to replace what seems to be a rotted back section [see pic] from the bumper down 2-joists-in, towards the middle of the trailer [both sides]. Basically 2 right angles, and re-attaching the bumper in the process.

Does anyone know if I can get this welded with the shell still on? Will the aluminum be of risk? Its pretty rotted, will it have to be cut off and a new section be added on, from 2 joists down?
Thanks folks

Muskie
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Old 01-05-2014, 04:01 AM   #63
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A little more difficult but doable if you stay away from the sides but remember the higher the level of difficulty the higher the price!
Cliff
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Old 01-05-2014, 07:42 AM   #64
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Muskie-

Think of it this way -- your frame hangs out beyond the axle like a diving board. If I understand you correctly, you're talking about splicing on to that frame for the last 4 to 6 feet. Right? You'd never do a triple Lindy off a weak diving board and you don't want a weak frame at your splice!

If so, that joint will be critical to the strength of the entire trailer. You will need to be sure that there is plenty of meat there to support the new frame. I'd touch base with Colin H. or someone who's done this before to be sure you have the right reinforcement designed to support that additional framing.

If you have the bellypan and floor removed, a welder can certainly get in there.

That said, you have some issues here. If it were mine, I'd pull the shell and do it right.

John
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Old 01-05-2014, 08:22 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskie View Post
I am at this point quite convinced that I only need to replace the bow and the stern of the floor [4 feet in]. That said I will know more when I take the belly pan off.

For anyone who has experience at this I have some questions:

The back frame needs attention, and wonder if it I can hire a welder to replace what seems to be a rotted back section [see pic] from the bumper down 2-joists-in, towards the middle of the trailer [both sides]. Basically 2 right angles, and re-attaching the bumper in the process.
I has been a lot of years since I studied welding design, so don't take this as gospel, only as food for thoughtó

1. Weld metal, if the welding rods (wire, whatever, depending on the welding rig involved) were properly selected, will be slightly stronger than the original metal. However, it will also be less flexible. This leads to stress concentration at the weld.

2. Joints are already stress concentration points. Given a choice, cut the frame for the splice midway between two joints, not at a joint.

3. To spread the stress over a wider area, use doubler plates at the weld, extending several inches past the splice on each side.

4. Splice should be a full-penetration weld, ground flush afterwards where the doubler plates will be added. Doubler plates should be fillet-welded all around.

5 - Welding generates a lot of heat; it has to be hot enough to melt metal, after all. And sparks/slag droplets are inevitable. You will want the frame to be bare-naked for several feet around the weld when the welding is done. Do not try to weld the frame with any part of the floor or skin in place around it. And remove any plumbing or wiring around it as well.

6. Final advice, get the welder to cut the existing frame as well as doing the welding, and let him buy the metal for the doubler plates. Do not make the cut yourself and then bring in the welder. Joint preparation is a crucial part of getting the weld done right, and that starts with the cut. And make sure the welder has been certified to AWS D1.5 for the welds he intends to perform.
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Old 01-05-2014, 10:49 AM   #66
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Thanks folks for the input.
All good info.

The span of the weld would only be about 2 ish feet on both sides [to the first metal joist], to then be attached to the end rail where the bumper would attach, so three pieces total.
The partial floor replacement would be indeed 4 feet. With the belly pan removed, and the original floor a good 2 feet away, I think a welder could make it work given the info you guys provided.

One other question:
Can I get away with using tap screws from above going through the C channel into the frame/outrigger, thus by-passing the need to use elevator bolts from underneath [for just the partial floor replacement]?
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