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Old 11-29-2013, 08:43 AM   #29
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1959 24' Tradewind
Phoenix , Arizona
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Sounds like you have a solid plan in place and you're on the right track to have a pro look at your running gear. I put in a new axle when I brought mine home by a local shop and beefed it up 500 pounds. They tested my leaf springs and assured me they were up to the task. Along with the new axle were new drum brakes to replace the untested hydraulic ones.

As for your serial number, it is hand stamped into the Airstream emblem in the bottom of your photo with the Land Yacht emblem. Yours is an Ohio build unit because California never used the TradeWind emblem on any of their units. I would appreciate if you'd post this number.

You mentioned having wires running on the floor for your musical equipment and since you'll probably be taking out the floor, how about jacks flush mounted in the floor to plug into? In such a tight space, things to trip over always seem to be in the way.

Also, please offer other forum members any of the items you take out since original replacements are impossible to source. Things like light fixtures, faucets, hardware, etc.

Keep up with the great ideas.

Brad
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Old 11-29-2013, 03:19 PM   #30
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1959 24' Tradewind
collingwood , Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfshr View Post
Sounds like you have a solid plan in place and you're on the right track to have a pro look at your running gear. I put in a new axle when I brought mine home by a local shop and beefed it up 500 pounds. They tested my leaf springs and assured me they were up to the task. Along with the new axle were new drum brakes to replace the untested hydraulic ones.

As for your serial number, it is hand stamped into the Airstream emblem in the bottom of your photo with the Land Yacht emblem. Yours is an Ohio build unit because California never used the TradeWind emblem on any of their units. I would appreciate if you'd post this number.

You mentioned having wires running on the floor for your musical equipment and since you'll probably be taking out the floor, how about jacks flush mounted in the floor to plug into? In such a tight space, things to trip over always seem to be in the way.

Also, please offer other forum members any of the items you take out since original replacements are impossible to source. Things like light fixtures, faucets, hardware, etc.

Keep up with the great ideas.

Brad
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Thanks Brad, yes the idea was to have the wires all sorted off the floor, coming from the ceiling, but yes perhaps flush from the floor could work better.

I will probably use any items that are left from the reno. Its very stripped. I pick it up in a weeks time, so will get the serial no. then.
Thanks for writing. Getting lots of info from you lot!
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Old 11-29-2013, 03:28 PM   #31
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1970 31' Sovereign
Asheville , North Carolina
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Hey there! I'm also the new owner of an airstream (1970 30' Sovereign) which I hope to turn into a mobile office + recording studio. Let's swap ideas sometime!

Looking forward to your project and good luck.
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Old 11-30-2013, 08:22 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by jmlabs View Post
Hey there! I'm also the new owner of an airstream (1970 30' Sovereign) which I hope to turn into a mobile office + recording studio. Let's swap ideas sometime!

Looking forward to your project and good luck.
\
Yes indeed!
The 30 is a bigger size and one of which would lend more to recording, but bit harder to navigate. That said, it all depends what you do with it.
I will be getting mine in a few days.
cheers.
Muskie
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Old 11-30-2013, 08:52 PM   #33
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1959 24' Tradewind
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Hey folks, as you can see, I just got more pics from a recent visit of the 1959. I was concerned about the wheels and suspension, but with more inspection and talk with the previous owner, I am feeing better about the safety of it. Jury is still out, and curious about your opinions, given the limitations of photos.
Rusty yes, but not rotted by my view. The welds onto the frame seem very sound.
The stern has definite issues, and I think it can be sorted by a welder doing a bit of magic, with re-belly skinning in the rear and a new floor all round.
I will tap screw the belly skin tight against the frame in due time as well.

Still my main concern is the safety. When we tow it 100 miles next week, I will get a feel for it. Please any suggestions welcome.

I will strip the floor and see what is lurking. The belly skin needs patches and new insulation, but will know more in weeks to come. I think coming in from the top is best, whilst doing the floor.

Not sure how to jack this baby up? Park on blocks, or buy axle jacks?
I have found a place to work on it, but it will be outside in a Canadian winter, so I need a generator asap....burr already below freezing.

Thanks for checking it out! Lots more pics to come.
I will ask about wiring soon, as decisions will have to be made when the floor process starts.
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Old 12-01-2013, 04:52 AM   #34
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1966 17' Caravel
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The first picture was a little like looking at the titanic I could see the bumper but what the heck!!! All in all not in to bad of shape you can fix it when you get it home and when you do get it back I would drop that belly pan for sure! Just my opinion I am adjusted to a warmer climate so probably would not be able to work on it till spring!
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Old 12-01-2013, 07:31 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by RM66caravel View Post
The first picture was a little like looking at the titanic I could see the bumper but what the heck!!! All in all not in to bad of shape you can fix it when you get it home and when you do get it back I would drop that belly pan for sure! Just my opinion I am adjusted to a warmer climate so probably would not be able to work on it till spring!
Cliff
Thanks, yes the bumper has been bumped up to a priority.
If I drop the belly pan, I would gather it would be not worth putting back on, and I would have to put a new one on the entire coach? I am more inclined to patch things, perhaps just the back 4' Again, I am not trying to restore this back to a livable unit, just a place to play music in, so no plumbing or beds etc... that said I do want it done well.
Becoming a big project regardless.
Thanks for your input.
-m
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Old 12-01-2013, 08:22 AM   #36
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1959 26' Overlander
Western , Massachusetts
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Bringing it home is called a "rescue mission" around here. You can use the search function for that term on this site or use Google with a phrase like this -- "rescue mission" site:airforums.com. You'll find more issues that others have encountered. Here are my thoughts:

You haven't shown pics of the curb side, so I'll assume you have the same door and our '59 Overlander. It's called a Suicide Door since it opens easily, especially if the frame is weaker. I'd definitely tie a line to the forward a-frame to keep it from whipping open and damaging your side wall.

If the windows have no actuators, tape them closed. Check your Hehr vents on the roof and remove them or tape them down. I lost one and I'm very lucky no one got hurt.

My bellypan let go on the ride home. Lots of duct tape barely held it up.

The obvious check list is lights, bearings, brakes, tires, safety chains and condition of the hitch.

<<<>>>

The picture of the bumper shows a good bit of galvanic corrosion around the rear cross member. Before you remove any of the floor to repair it, making a luan pattern will help you replace it more easily. This page on FranksTrailerWorksBlog documents it well.

You won't find much in the way of wiring inside, especially on the 12 volt side. It was pretty basic.

Belly Pan Screws? Do they have a good wide head like the usual Belly Pan Rivets?
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Old 12-01-2013, 09:08 AM   #37
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1959 24' Tradewind
collingwood , Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 65CV View Post
Bringing it home is called a "rescue mission" around here. You can use the search function for that term on this site or use Google with a phrase like this -- "rescue mission" site:airforums.com. You'll find more issues that others have encountered. Here are my thoughts:

You haven't shown pics of the curb side, so I'll assume you have the same door and our '59 Overlander. It's called a Suicide Door since it opens easily, especially if the frame is weaker. I'd definitely tie a line to the forward a-frame to keep it from whipping open and damaging your side wall.

If the windows have no actuators, tape them closed. Check your Hehr vents on the roof and remove them or tape them down. I lost one and I'm very lucky no one got hurt.

My bellypan let go on the ride home. Lots of duct tape barely held it up.



The obvious check list is lights, bearings, brakes, tires, safety chains and condition of the hitch.

<<<>>>

The picture of the bumper shows a good bit of galvanic corrosion around the rear cross member. Before you remove any of the floor to repair it, making a luan pattern will help you replace it more easily. This page on FranksTrailerWorksBlog documents it well.

You won't find much in the way of wiring inside, especially on the 12 volt side. It was pretty basic.

Belly Pan Screws? Do they have a good wide head like the usual Belly Pan Rivets?
Thanks for that. Lots of info in there.
Yes the vents are boarded with ply, which is good, and well caulked, as are a couple windows. I will cover the windows with aluminium for security. No real leaks except the front window, and I need to re plexy it/ caulk etc.
The unit was recently towed 400km. bearings were filled with grease, and checked for heat, all well. The brakes are another issue. on the Rescue Mission it will be no brakes, but a 3/4 ton truck is pulling her empty. Should be fine.
I am unclear as to what a luan pattern is in reference to the bumper you suggested, but will follow the link.
The more I am learning the more I feel I have to do, yet I must be careful that my needs are basic, and I am not bring this back to its perfect shape. It isn't a restoration, but a transformation. It is easy to get lured into perfection.
That said, your input and everyone else's is huge!

You mentioned the door, yes it is a suicide door with the middle door bolted shut. One question: bugs? Has anyone sorted a screen situation for these doors other than the middle door? Or do I need to try and get that middle door open and functioning. There are ''new'' hitches on the door that span over to the middle door, so that would be a replacement. Sadly no pic right now.

Cheers.
-m
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:11 AM   #38
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Nowhere , Washington
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You should really pull the entire belly pan down for a couple reasons - first you will need the access to replace the floor and second you will need the access to inspect and repair any frame damage. From the looks and your description of the condition of the trailer, it sounds like you have some extensive floor repair ahead.

The floor is integral to the entire structure and safety of the trailer. It is sandwiched between the frame and the shell and keeps everything tied together. Unfortunately, when it fails, it requires a lot of deconstruction to get to the point you can replace it correctly. And the area of the floor most likely to be rotten is usually the most important section to the structure - the part that is underneath the c-channel. Plus, when there is floor rot, there is almost always some accompanying rusted out cross members under the floor that meed replacement. It is a lot of work, but in the end you will save time by just attacking it all at once rather than poking around and discovering the inevitable need to pull it all apart.

The good news is that since you are not shooting for a full restoration, you just need to get the floor and frame repaired to accomplish you primary goals - making it safe for use. My recommendation is pull the belly pan, template the old floor, pull the floor, fix any frame issues, replace the floor (shell on probably, but that's another decision you'll have to make) and then move on to installing your wiring needs and insulation before installing a new belly pan. If you have room and a few basic skills and tools you can get it done in a reasonable amount of time. Our entire frame off restoration took 18 months. But that included much more extensive rebuilding. Good luck and keep posting questions and photos. Folks here like to cheer on anyone crazy enough to take these projects on.

Norm
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Old 12-01-2013, 01:27 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by nmbosa View Post
You should really pull the entire belly pan down for a couple reasons - first you will need the access to replace the floor and second you will need the access to inspect and repair any frame damage. From the looks and your description of the condition of the trailer, it sounds like you have some extensive floor repair ahead.

The floor is integral to the entire structure and safety of the trailer. It is sandwiched between the frame and the shell and keeps everything tied together. Unfortunately, when it fails, it requires a lot of deconstruction to get to the point you can replace it correctly. And the area of the floor most likely to be rotten is usually the most important section to the structure - the part that is underneath the c-channel. Plus, when there is floor rot, there is almost always some accompanying rusted out cross members under the floor that meed replacement. It is a lot of work, but in the end you will save time by just attacking it all at once rather than poking around and discovering the inevitable need to pull it all apart.

The good news is that since you are not shooting for a full restoration, you just need to get the floor and frame repaired to accomplish you primary goals - making it safe for use. My recommendation is pull the belly pan, template the old floor, pull the floor, fix any frame issues, replace the floor (shell on probably, but that's another decision you'll have to make) and then move on to installing your wiring needs and insulation before installing a new belly pan. If you have room and a few basic skills and tools you can get it done in a reasonable amount of time. Our entire frame off restoration took 18 months. But that included much more extensive rebuilding. Good luck and keep posting questions and photos. Folks here like to cheer on anyone crazy enough to take these projects on.

Norm
Norm
Thanks for that, and I didn't quite really understand the floor fix until you pointed that out. I does raise a question; Can I avoid taking the belly pan off if the cabinets are all out, and I unscrew the floor from the top, and sawzzle out any screws from above, even close to the edge in hard to reach areas? It is winter here...and I am doing this outside!
And... how tricky is it to put the old pan or a new one on?
Thanks
-m
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Old 12-01-2013, 01:39 PM   #40
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I guess what confuses me [again I am new to this] is this video
of a guy re-doing the floor with the belly pan on.
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Old 12-01-2013, 04:57 PM   #41
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Just watched the video and it's not clear whether that guy will try to complete the floor replacement with the pan in place. At one point he mentions reattaching the belly pan and towards the rear of the trailer it looks like you can see daylight between the bottom of the shell and the belly pan. I think he may have started dropping the pan.

The problem with not taking the pan down is that the original elevator bolts have nuts on the underside. The original framing members are not thick enough to simply use self-taping screws alone (they will just strip out). So, you need to get a nut on the underside to secure the floor to the frame unless you plan to replace all the framing cross members with a heavier gauge metal that will support self-taping screws.

More problematic are the c-channel to shell braces. There are several angle braces along the circumference of the trailer that attach to ribs of the trailer and are then bolted through the c-channel, through the floor, and through an outrigger with a nut on the bottom. Those are important to replace properly to make sure the shell, floor, frame attachment is solid.

Don't get me wrong - dropping the belly pan and reattaching it can be a real pain in the neck. To pull it down completely, you have to drill all the bucked rivets along the exterior bottom edge of the trailer. The belly pan is wrapped up and over the c-channel (behind the exterior skin) and the rivets go through the exterior skin, the belly pan, and the c-channel. Many folks here on the forum have just cut out the center of the belly pan and left the curved sections that are riveted to the c-channel in place. That provides enough access to get to all the flooring, while avoiding the more difficult full belly pan replacement.

By the way, not sure you had thought about this, but you are going to need to take at least the lower level of interior skins out to access the c-channel and get the new flooring in place. The upside to that is you will be able to run your wiring behind the walls before you put it all back together.
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Old 12-01-2013, 05:17 PM   #42
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Here are a few photos of how everything is tied together through the c-channel. This should give you an idea of what you need to access in order to get the old floor out and put some new flooring in. To remove the old flooring, you need to access the c-channel and remove all the screws and such holding the c-channel down - some of which extend through framing outriggers. The new sheets of plywood need to extend all the way to the edge of the trailer and the c-channel will need to be screwed down to the new plywood.

You can also see in a couple of these pictures how the belly pan is slid up between the exterior skins and the c-channel and is wrapped over the c-channel in some areas.
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