Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-17-2015, 10:59 AM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
What I learned gutting my AS

Hi Folks:

Newbie here.

I pulled the Hotel home three weeks ago and backed it into my backyard.

Purchase Condition:
- It was full of junk, and badly molded.
- All doors and latches were included.
- No propane tanks.
- Original appliances were included, Sans inverter.

My workflow thus far:

1) removed all junk, kept anything that appeared AS related.
2) began disassembling the interior - all of it. It's like a puzzle so take your time and drill out the rivets! I trashed all of the bathroom too.
3) I carefully removed the upper cabinets so that I could re-install them.
4) I removed all the copper / Pex plumbing and trashed it.
5) All the appliances I trashed.
6) I lubricated every bolt I could find with a penetrating solvent, multiple times.
7) I did a "quick de-funk" with a bucket of clorox water and a push broom as the interior skins were disgusting.
8) After I got all the interior cabinetry out, I drilled out all the interior skins rivets.
9) I have an old digital camera and took hundreds of pictures.
10) I wore a mask, clear goggles, and tried to work methodically.
11) I then I then removed the interior formed plastic ends, very carefully. At the last minute the front one dropped and crashed to the ground - lucky for me it did not break!

12) my GF and I carefully carried all the aluminum panel skins after marking on the back with a sharpie where they went to the driveway and laid them appearance side up. They were so disgusting they made us sick. I then poured clorox and ajax all over them - using three big can of ajax and two gallons of bleach and a driveway push boom. We were amazed how clean they came and how quickly. we repeated this just for revenge at the gross mold and mildew rinsed them really well them flipped them over and cleaned bug residue all from the back as well. We then rolled them up inside one another for storage purposes and I hand trucked them back to my rear carport. Then I pulled all the pink glass wearing a mask, long sleeves and jeans (it was 85 degrees here in Orlando that day so I was soaking wet in 5 minutes) and filled up 5 giant 3 mil garbage bags of the pink stuff. I cable tied up all the wiring.


Part II - Flooring

13) C-Channel: I feared battling the removal of 30 some odd 40 year old crusty bolts. I opened the windows, placed my box fan on me, and took my time, All I needed was a pair of vice grips, my 4.5" angle grinder, a hammer and a punch.

- The entire thing only took me an hour and a half. 1/3 of them just fell out, 1/3 I rocked back and forth and they broke easily, the other 1/3 I was able to use the angle grinder with a thin blade and cut them off at the base of the C-Channel.

- I used my circular saw and cut openings in the floor up front and in back. I used these cut-outs as anchors to hammer the plywood out from the channel. To my surprise I was able to hammer the plywood out easily from the from and the rear in an effort to keep the curved plywood as a template when I replace it with new stuff. BTW - I suspect the plywood is made of REDWOOD! It's rich red color and scent makes me think this.

*** NOTE: These trailers almost certainly came with asbestos sheet flooring. Luckily mine was already removed. Don't F with it if you have it. Find a way to not cut the Asbestos making it friable thus breathable .Their is a 20-30 year latency period, but if your like my you like having a pair of lungs! I'm not at all certain of the % asbestos in the flooring, so someone may know much better than I, so just be careful and make sure your good with that.


14) Originally I used a hole saw and drilled around the elevator bolts thinking they would be impossible to remove. After drilling maybe 15 - 20, I grabbed my DeWalt circular saw, set the blade depth to the plywood thickness and cut 1/4 inch away running the full width of the flooring and simply pulled up all the flooring. **This turned out to only take me a measly couple hours, after I feared it would take days. Yay!! Like the C-Channel above 1/3 I actually unscrewed, which amazed me after 40 years, 1/3 fell out and 1/3 I cut with the grinder metal cutting blade.

15) Good news / bad news, on the initial tow home the fresh water tank fell out and after realizing I had no way of fixing it, I just continued the 35 mile trip home dragging the tank and plywood and copper plumbing. Suffice to say I arrived home sans all of that. Since I was missing the aluminum belly pan for the tank section - I stood on the ground and used a wet/dry shop vac and sucked up all the crap in the belly. I manually pulled out all the fiberglass and filled three giant 3 mil trash bags.

Now it's GO / NOGO time. The frame has to be professionally evaluated to determine if it's salvageable or not. There was a lot of rust near the Aframe and of course in the rear. The out riggers all need to be replaced, so hopefully I'll know something in the next couple weeks after I carefully trailer this beast (at 10 MPH) to the trailer / welder guy. Worst case scenario: I learned a lot about AS, and maybe recouped $900 bucks at the recycler for the aluminum.

Wish me luck! P.S. All of you folks have helped me with this and not know it - I spent a lot of time on this site researching what you've already learned !

- Brek
__________________

__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 11:12 AM   #2
4 Rivet Member

 
2015 27' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 446
Send a message via AIM to hhendrix Send a message via Yahoo to hhendrix
Interesting. Post some pics.
__________________

__________________
The ability to follow instructions is highly underrated.
hhendrix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 11:17 AM   #3
Rivet Master
 
1973 25' Tradewind
Beautiful , Oregon
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 548
Good Luck with the project. I have been sort of there. Still working on 2 years later. 1973 Tradewind.

Tony
__________________
Tony S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 04:30 PM   #4
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
I'll try and get some pics up soon...
__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 01:22 PM   #5
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 27' Overlander
Woodburn , Oregon
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 131
This is very interesting to me as I am also in the process of renovating my 1972 overlander , thankfully mine was in far better shape to start with than yours . I'm hoping to have about $. 20k in mine when she is totally finished I'm replacing just about everything with better newer upgraded items that is possible
__________________
shineybullet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 10:40 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
Wabbiteer's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1972 29' Ambassador
St. Paul , Minnesota
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,912
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 2
Remember you do not need to limit the number of outriggers (save for the solid wheel tub & step ones) - you can sister up near existing weakened ones and just keep going, no need to cut everything out. Also outriggers may have been replaced along the way after the flooring had sagged, they will be up to 3/8" lower than the main frame rails or fitted to match the slope. Also check that the axle mounting plate has not been deformed by the outrigger leverage on them, or that rust & freeze heave has not bowed out the axle plate in select places..
__________________

Wabbiteer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 06:07 AM   #7
1 Rivet Member
 
1964 24' Tradewind
Tucson , Arizona
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 6
We're doing the same thing on a recently rescued 64 Trade Wind. In Fact, we could have written what you've done down to the goggles and bleach. We have a long ways to go, but it'll be worth it when we're done.
__________________
Planteman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 08:47 AM   #8
2 Rivet Member
 
1968 22' Safari
Tulsa , Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 80
It seems there are several forum members at this stage, including me. Yesterday, I removed everything (built-ins, but no interior skin, which appears in very good condition, spotless in some places) fore of the wheel wells on our '68 Safari. I was pleasantly surprised to find that, for the most part, the floor was OK. Not great, but not horrible, either. As I can see daylight at the floor/wall joint across the back end, I suspect that, when I remove the bathroom, I'll find bigger problems.

Let's keep this string going.
__________________
splyb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 10:05 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
DavidsonOverlander's Avatar

 
1964 26' Overlander
1974 31' Sovereign
Milton , ON
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 798
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Remember you do not need to limit the number of outriggers (save for the solid wheel tub & step ones) - you can sister up near existing weakened ones and just keep going, no need to cut everything out.
Good point! You also don't always need to replace the whole outrigger. I replaced some whole outriggers on our '74 Sovereign, but for a lot of them I cut off the bottom part that was rusted and just replaced that part. Most were like this one, solid on the top but rusted through on the lower portion.

Sorry I don't have a better photo, but if you look closely on the photo below you can see the weld line where the bottom of this one was replaced.

This was easier than replacing the whole outrigger. Also much quicker because I made the outriggers and bottom parts myself and just replacing the bottom meant a simpler part to make and it was easier to clamp to the existing outrigger to weld rather than lining up and clamping a new one.

I also added support to the outriggers that support the step. Details here.
__________________
Grant Davidson
Milton, ON

1946 Spartan Manor
1954 Va-Ka-Shun-Ette
1964 Overlander
1965 Avion C-10 Truck Camper
1974 Sovereign
2005 F-350 SRW 4x4 crew cab long box
TAC ON-5
DavidsonOverlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 09:51 PM   #10
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by splyb View Post
It seems there are several forum members at this stage, including me. Yesterday, I removed everything (built-ins, but no interior skin, which appears in very good condition, spotless in some places) fore of the wheel wells on our '68 Safari. I was pleasantly surprised to find that, for the most part, the floor was OK. Not great, but not horrible, either. As I can see daylight at the floor/wall joint across the back end, I suspect that, when I remove the bathroom, I'll find bigger problems.

Let's keep this string going.
Great job. I know when I removed the very last piece of Plywood - which I suspect is made from Redwood due to it's color - in the rear bath, I found pretty much what I expected. one main rail of the two was rotted clear through (near the toilet area). Such that when I removed the plywood, the bumper sagged....

The plywood was mostly in good shape, but all my outriggers need replacing...

This is the worst part, so let's keep out heads down and keep going and imagine how nice it will by with a rigid frame, and new ply!

- Brek

Brek
__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 03:29 PM   #11
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
Pictures from my '73 27' Overland Gutting

Hey Gang:

Newbie here with some images of my gut job over the past three weeks.

This is what I started with: a badly neglected project, but the price was pretty damn good and I felt the shell was surprisingly good. But I found out why it was during my gut job!

Top image is at PO house.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2509.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	282.7 KB
ID:	254346   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2511.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	343.6 KB
ID:	254347  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2385.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	300.2 KB
ID:	254348   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2392.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	231.2 KB
ID:	254349  

__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 03:40 PM   #12
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
After The clean out

Attached images:Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2396.jpg
Views:	105
Size:	355.6 KB
ID:	254354

It was pretty gross. I did keep:

- sliding pocket door for bathroom. not pictured.
- wardrobe closet - a set of three "lockers". pictured
- all electrical (12v & 110) wiring which was in really good shape.
- tambour cabinets.
The black stuff on the interior is all mold. Fun!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7120.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	401.1 KB
ID:	254355   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2402.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	472.7 KB
ID:	254356  

Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7123.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	298.1 KB
ID:	254357   Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7127.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	226.2 KB
ID:	254358  

__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 03:43 PM   #13
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
Final set of Gut Job

Hey Guys:

We laid the interior skins out, and they cleaned up very well. They should take oil based gloss paint. That's the plan.

When I removed the fiberglass - that's when I found a secret message from may 20 (my birthday! - 1987 from Avalon RV in Ohio, where the entire side of the AS was re-skinned!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7132.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	307.2 KB
ID:	254359   Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7133.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	269.7 KB
ID:	254360  

Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7135.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	362.6 KB
ID:	254361   Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7136.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	247.2 KB
ID:	254362  

__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 03:48 PM   #14
2 Rivet Member
 
GuitarmanFL's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 67
Frame Images

All the floor is out.
all the tanks are out.
I left the plumbing for now.

My shop vac worked great and suck up 42 years of debris. Surprisingly no dead rats! Found some acorns though.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7142.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	286.2 KB
ID:	254363   Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7145.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	320.8 KB
ID:	254364  

Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7152.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	335.4 KB
ID:	254365   Click image for larger version

Name:	CIMG7162.jpg
Views:	101
Size:	326.1 KB
ID:	254366  

__________________

__________________
GuitarmanFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Things we learned from Toby eubank The Pet Forum 16 04-06-2008 01:18 PM
A Lesson Learned From Three Dogs ROBERT CROSS The Pet Forum 6 03-21-2008 01:44 PM
Inteli-Power install in 78 Excella Lessons Learned ALTE797 Electrical - Systems, Generators, Batteries & Solar 8 04-12-2007 08:36 AM
The Flat Tire Fixed! and lessons learned thecatsandi Tires 28 12-29-2006 07:55 PM
Pullrite owners--lessons learned markparker22 Hitches, Couplers & Balls 10 04-17-2005 11:57 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.