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Old 03-25-2011, 06:35 PM   #15
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MARINE PLYWOOD (DOUGLES FIRR A/C) WILL BE MY SUBFLOORING PRODUCT.
Could now use recomendations for floor insulation options?
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:52 PM   #16
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Use good plywood, seal the edges with epoxy (West System is great), paint the underside with 3 coats of marine spar urethane , fix all the leaks in the trailer that caused the first floor to rot and you will not have to worry about it and you will have saved a ton of money that you WILL spend on other stuff you have not thought of at this point.
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Old 03-25-2011, 08:33 PM   #17
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Yeah, we aren't done talking about plywood yet.

I used plywood that had the voids filled already, epoxied the edges, and used 3 coats of water based Verathane on bottom and top.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:09 PM   #18
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I recommend you use a meranti marine plywood. It is very flat, very solid, and has zero voids. The glue can pass a 48 hour boil test ( look it up on Wiki, the test involves boiling a sample for 24 hours. The glue must not break down. It passes 48 hours, but the wood fiber breaks down first. This brand doubles the standard) which will allow you to skip the coating stage without the least bit of guilt. The brand I use is called Aquatec and it runs me about $120/ sheet at the plywood wholesaler.

For underfloor insulation I use 2" ridged foam. The kind that is dense and yellow with a foil coat on the face and a blue vapor barrier on the back. I cut it very tight to fit and glue it to the underside of the sub floor. This gives a very high R value.

I will close by saying that advantex worked great as sheathing on my house. I would never consider it for a trailer though.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:14 PM   #19
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I had some floor repair to do and went with Advantech. 3/4 sheet was $22, but it wasn't the price that made my decision. My brother has built many homes over the years and this is all he will use in his subflooring. You can literally put it in a pool for a year and it wont change shape or size. Why would you want to buy high end plywood then add a bunch of sealants to it? Why not just buy a product that has everything you need in it already. My biggest issue when considering flooring and floor coverings is to eliminate the water issues. Reading a lot of threads it seems that floor rot is something that everyone will face at some point owning a vintage AS. So why not eliminate the issue by using a product that will never or not in my life time rot.

As for insulation. I used cans of spray foam. Andy from Inland was quoted that the Pink panther was what he uses, but to me why use something that will hold moisture if it ever got wet. His points were that any foam type will crumble overtime. I have one of the few '69's that they used spray on the underside of the subfloor that was in great shape when ripped up the floor. Heck that was '69 technology. I would think that Dow makes a better product today....but who knows.

I'm happy with my choices. I gave it a lot of thought. If you don't need the tongue you can easily break or cut it off. I also used several tubes of Vulkem around the edges. Edges I don't plan on seeing in my lifetime. . . .

Hope my 2 cents help....
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Old 03-31-2011, 07:45 PM   #20
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Just thought I would respond to the comments on Advantech for flooring. I suspect that some may have confused Advantech for ordinary Oriented Strand Board (OSB). There is a world of difference in the production of the two. Advantech specifications for strength and water resistance make it far superior to commodity OSB and plywood.
How do I know? Well, I admit to working for one of the plants that produce Advantech. I can also tell you that I have frame up rebuilt two campers and now doing a third, an Avalair, frame up, similar construction to an Airstream. I would not do this much work without putting in what I think the best flooring, Advantech. The product undergoes continuous testing for meeting its rigorous specifications. Anyway, thatís what goes into my constructions. If you choose this, you must specify Advantech as there are those trying to copy (unsucessfully).
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Old 03-31-2011, 08:05 PM   #21
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I build houses and love advantech for my work. We sank a peice into the lake for 6 months and could have used it on a home. I wonder what results would be if we had removed allowed to dry and resank many times over??? My original question is truely motivated by my lack of KNOWLEDGE reguarding camper floors an marine plywood. I
want to use the right product.
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Old 03-31-2011, 09:05 PM   #22
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I don't think I would use AvanTech

Q. Can I paint AdvanTech subflooring and sheathing panels?
AdvanTech panels can be left natural, stained, varnished or painted with oil or epoxy based paints or oil based primer and latex paint. Water seal is not recommended. AdvanTech panels are not recommended for exterior siding or other applications that are permanently exposed to the weather.

Please someone sell it to me! I have to buy subfloor within a week!
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Old 03-31-2011, 11:03 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nukeblade View Post
I don't think I would use AvanTech

Q. Can I paint AdvanTech subflooring and sheathing panels?
AdvanTech panels can be left natural, stained, varnished or painted with oil or epoxy based paints or oil based primer and latex paint. Water seal is not recommended. AdvanTech panels are not recommended for exterior siding or other applications that are permanently exposed to the weather.

Please someone sell it to me! I have to buy subfloor within a week!
I believe this applies to the sheathing and not the actual subflooring since there is only reference to the sheathing. I laid 2 layers of oil based paint over mine and had no issues.

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Old 04-01-2011, 05:08 AM   #24
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I guess we will all know which material is the correct one in 40 years. 2 years is not a proving ground and either is 10 for that matter. When Airstream started using chip board as it's floor I doubt seriously that they ever dreamed it would fail like it did. They used it to save money on construction and it came back to bite them, big time. Having worked in wood most of my adult life, I have incredible doubt as to the use many of you are putting this product to. You can show me studies all day and night, but there is no way that compressed, chopped up wood is going to out preform cross laminated plywood sheets.
Time will tell for sure who is right. I would hate to have to redo it all just to save a couple hundred bucks today.
This thread has run it's course for me. I hope you find the product you feel comfortable with. Good luck to all of you with your floors.
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Old 04-01-2011, 05:14 PM   #25
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I bought my marine plywood for this week end thanks all !!!!!
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Old 04-01-2011, 09:11 PM   #26
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Cool. Did you get the meranti like Frank suggested? I tried to get it when I purchased my flooring, but none to be found.
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Old 04-02-2011, 04:22 AM   #27
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just to add. Meranti is a tree like fir or oak. It is a tropical mahogany though it is not a true mahogany species. Luan is a very close cousin. Many know luan as underlayment for vinyl flooring. Meranti is used because it has very straight fine grain. There are other species of wood used in marine plywood. Oakum is the most common one used. Beware or the splinters in meranti. They are very easy to get and will begin festering within 8 hours
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:48 AM   #28
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CoachJeff, you made the right choice!! Like I told you in the PM. I have sold and used sheathing products for thirty years and a good quality(A/C) douglas fir plywood is the best product for your application. OSB is OSB--some mills put more glue in it and the rest is MARKETING!!!!
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