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Old 03-09-2004, 06:20 PM   #1
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Question Planning how to refloor a 66 Sovereign: currently, smelly carpet & pad over linoleum

I am restoring a 1966 Sovereign Twin and I am developing a project plan on what to do first. I have several flooring related questions, but first, the background:

I think the subfloor is in good condition, however, some of the Linoleum near the door can be easily pulled up. I don't know the condition of the Linoleum of the rest of the floor (it's covered with carpet from livingroom to bathroom). Previous owners installed a thick pad and carpeting over the Linoleum using tack strips. See picture for details.

I am planning to remove the carpet (I have allergies), and I am strongly considering replacing linoleum OR covering old linoleum with sheet vinyl.

The flooring questions I have are:
1. Should I do flooring earlier or later in the project (before or after cleaning and repairs)?
2. Should I remove all the cabinets/fixtures or can I refloor/patch without removing them?
3. What is the recommended way to remove the carpeting and floor tack strips? Is it just rip and pull with brute strength or is there a process to follow?
4. Any other tips/lessons learned that I should follow?

Thanks in advance for your help!
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Old 03-09-2004, 06:33 PM   #2
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Should I do flooring earlier or later in the project (before or after cleaning and repairs)?

Do the floors later. If you are keeping the cabinets, refinish them first. Why worry about ruining your new floor?

2. Should I remove all the cabinets/fixtures or can I refloor/patch without removing them?

See the answer to your first question. If you are keeping the cabinets (which I hope you are!) and can refinish them in place, why take them out?

3. What is the recommended way to remove the carpeting and floor tack strips? Is it just rip and pull with brute strength or is there a process to follow?

Rip the carpet out. Once the carpet is completely out, it will be easy to just pull the tacks and strips out.

4. Any other tips/lessons learned that I should follow?

Patience!
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Old 03-09-2004, 06:39 PM   #3
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new floor covering

I just started on my new floor today. You are lucky the PO used tack strips,mine was put down with heavy duty staples. I jokingly said there were 300 staples , now I would guess 1000, but its all out and cleaned up.I am putting wood floors all the way to the rear bath. Good luck with your project. PJ
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Old 03-09-2004, 09:16 PM   #4
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I would take my time removing the old carpeting or you can give yourself extra work later by damaging the subfloor from pulling too hard on the tack strips. You can use a utility knife to cut the carpet out if necessary. Then use a small prybar to carefully remove the tack strips. When I replaced the flooring in my trailer I decided to use a "high quality" Armstrong stick-on floor tile rather than the sheet vinyl. This drastically reduced material waste and made the job a lot easier to do. If I was going to use sheet flooring, I would seriously consider removing most of the interior of the trailer. Otherwise, installing the vinyl will be a nightmare of a job with the many corners and angles of most Airstream floors. The best way WITHOUT removing the interior would be to first make a template of the entire floor and then cut the flooring outside of the trailer. I can explain in detail if you decide to use this method. When I replaced the flooring in my Sovereign I removed the couches and beds only. They are not hard to remove and I feel better knowing that if the windows leak there will be finished flooring under them. I also ran a bead of 100% silicone caulking between the walls and the new flooring for this same reason.

If you are planning to COVER the existing lino with the sheet flooring you will need to completely strip the old lino of any wax, dirt, etc. Also, you need to be careful that the existing lino is secure and not loose or lifting. You can reglue it, but sometimes it is easier and better to just remove the old lino. Another benefit of removing the old lino is that it can trap odors, especially if any previous owners were heavy smokers. Either way, BE SURE the floor is properly prepared before laying new vinyl. Every crack, seam and indentation in the lino will need to be filled and sanded or they will telegraph through to the new flooring. If you remove the lino, then you will need to scrape the floor to make sure there are no raised surfaces from old lino or glue before filling the seams, indentations and nail and bolt holes before sanding. Most fillers are cement based so you just mix them with water and apply with a putty knife. Don't mix too much at once or it will begin to harden before you are finished applying it. Use a fan to help it dry quicker. I usually sand by hand using a sanding block. An electric orbital sander can be used but it creates a HUGE mess as the dust is very fine and black.

Good luck!

bbb
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Old 03-13-2004, 12:35 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by luckydc
Should I do flooring earlier or later in the project (before or after cleaning and repairs)?

Do the floors later. If you are keeping the cabinets, refinish them first. Why worry about ruining your new floor?
2. Should I remove all the cabinets/fixtures or can I refloor/patch without removing them?

See the answer to your first question. If you are keeping the cabinets (which I hope you are!) and can refinish them in place, why take them out?


Yes - the original cabinets are going to stay.....I think they look great. They just need to be cleaned...! Guess that is an example of where your suggestion for patience comes in...right?

Also, thanks so much for your advice!

Quote:

3. What is the recommended way to remove the carpeting and floor tack strips? Is it just rip and pull with brute strength or is there a process to follow?

Rip the carpet out. Once the carpet is completely out, it will be easy to just pull the tacks and strips out.

4. Any other tips/lessons learned that I should follow?

Patience!
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Old 03-13-2004, 01:08 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by biggerbadbrad
I would take my time removing the old carpeting or you can give yourself extra work later by damaging the subfloor from pulling too hard on the tack strips. You can use a utility knife to cut the carpet out if necessary. Then use a small prybar to carefully remove the tack strips. When I replaced the flooring in my trailer I decided to use a "high quality" Armstrong stick-on floor tile rather than the sheet vinyl. This drastically reduced material waste and made the job a lot easier to do. If I was going to use sheet flooring, I would seriously consider removing most of the interior of the trailer. Otherwise, installing the vinyl will be a nightmare of a job with the many corners and angles of most Airstream floors. The best way WITHOUT removing the interior would be to first make a template of the entire floor and then cut the flooring outside of the trailer. I can explain in detail if you decide to use this method. When I replaced the flooring in my Sovereign I removed the couches and beds only. They are not hard to remove and I feel better knowing that if the windows leak there will be finished flooring under them. I also ran a bead of 100% silicone caulking between the walls and the new flooring for this same reason.


Great detail! I think you have given me enough info to definately shy away from sheet vinyl.....I was worried about the cutting of a large sheet, but your've given me confidence to think I could handle smaller squares. One step at a time, right?
Quote:

If you are planning to COVER the existing lino with the sheet flooring you will need to completely strip the old lino of any wax, dirt, etc. Also, you need to be careful that the existing lino is secure and not loose or lifting.
I might have a problem there. Some tiles near the door are loose.
Quote:

You can reglue it, but sometimes it is easier and better to just remove the old lino. Another benefit of removing the old lino is that it can trap odors, especially if any previous owners were heavy smokers.
I received a copy of the owners manual today and it reads like I may have asbestos vinyl flooring. Another difficulty. If it is asbestos, I guess I'll have to research safe handling methods if I need to remove or sand the floor.
Quote:

Either way, BE SURE the floor is properly prepared before laying new vinyl. Every crack, seam and indentation in the lino will need to be filled and sanded or they will telegraph through to the new flooring. If you remove the lino, then you will need to scrape the floor to make sure there are no raised surfaces from old lino or glue before filling the seams, indentations and nail and bolt holes before sanding. Most fillers are cement based so you just mix them with water and apply with a putty knife. Don't mix too much at once or it will begin to harden before you are finished applying it. Use a fan to help it dry quicker. I usually sand by hand using a sanding block. An electric orbital sander can be used but it creates a HUGE mess as the dust is very fine and black.
I had toyed with the idea of "sealing the old floor" by installing a 1/4 hard plywood sub-floor, but I think it would make the floor too thick and add more weight. Plus, I would also have the challenge of cutting the subfloor to fit.

My fear with tile squares has been that they will "pop up" due to movement of the trailer. Is this a possibility or a probability? Does it depend on how well the floor is prepared and how the new floor is glued?
Quote:


Good luck!
Again, your post was very detailed and very helpful. You have given me a lot to think about and good ideas to start.

Thank you very much!
Quote:

bbb
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Old 03-13-2004, 01:13 AM   #7
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Re: new floor covering

Quote:
Originally posted by bswaslien@aol.com
I just started on my new floor today. You are lucky the PO used tack strips,mine was put down with heavy duty staples. I jokingly said there were 300 staples , now I would guess 1000, but its all out and cleaned up.I am putting wood floors all the way to the rear bath.

Thanks and good luck with your wood floor!
Quote:
Good luck with your project. PJ
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Old 03-13-2004, 08:23 AM   #8
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Exclamation

Suggestion:

Try not to rush the installation of your flooring, whatever the material.

Be very meticuluous in your inspection for deterioration & repair ALL areas of the sub-floor. Crop & renew any suspect areas. If you just cover over discolored or visually deteriorated areas with 'goop' to smooth the surface, you will pay the penalty later 'down-the-road'.

Regards,
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Old 03-13-2004, 11:27 AM   #9
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Becky -- Do a search on asbestos. Though it was available in roll flooring also, tile squares of 9x9" dimension signify asbestos. Those 'in the know' have said this size was abandoned to help folks know the difference in the future (which is now...?!).
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Old 03-13-2004, 07:31 PM   #10
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Much thanks!

Thanks to everyone! Sounds like I have more planning and research before I start on the flooring. I am not in a rush....I like to plan the work and then work the plan!

Thanks much!
Becky
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Old 05-29-2004, 07:48 AM   #11
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The asbestos danger is blown all out of proportion by the media. You have to work in it for many years, breathing the fibers, to have significant lung damage. any asbestos that is encapsillated in plastic or cement is considered safe to handle. the only time it is dangerous is if ground excedingly fine and breathed. Asbestos was used ,mixed with asphalt or vinyl, because of its ability to strengthen the finished product. Now they use glass fiber that is just as dangerous, if breathed. Just something to set your mind at ease while you are tearing out the floor
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Old 05-29-2004, 09:34 AM   #12
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Wear protective mask ...Please

Please be sure to wear protective mask.. avoid overexposure .. asbestosis and the cancer it can cause many years down the road is not a good thing.. am a Registered Nurse and watched my best friend's husband die of this.. Please be safe.. Annie..
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Old 09-05-2005, 03:48 PM   #13
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Hello, from JAPAN !
I have a 1966 Sovereign 30'.
I am looking for the drawing (floor plan ) of that.
Because,I will re-make that a cafe.
A construction dealer said to me that it was necessary for that.
Do you have any idea ?
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Old 09-05-2005, 04:34 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elmokika
Hello, from JAPAN !
I have a 1966 Sovereign 30'.
I am looking for the drawing (floor plan ) of that.
Because,I will re-make that a cafe.
A construction dealer said to me that it was necessary for that.
Do you have any idea ?
Vintage Airstream Club may have copies of floorplans for your coach. You can check their website for information.
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