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Old 08-13-2008, 08:50 PM   #15
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You have to buy it from the factory. The manager of the company has been selling it to some trailer manufactures and he told me that he has met with RV builders. This is a pretty new company. He started in 2005.

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Old 08-14-2008, 01:51 AM   #16
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Hi Brian,

It's really not even that expensive compared to other common substrate materials. You might or might not know, but top-quality Marine Grade Plywood often runs around $125/sheet depending on your location, so the cost of the material itself is comparable to solutions that others are using.

The distribution is the key, because the shipping costs are high.

If they can resolve that issue, I could see it being used almost exclusively as the substrate for RVs, boats, and any other application where you'd like something strong, somewhat flexible, and water-proof.

-Marcus
For those doing a shell-off restoration of a medium to short trailer... it is available in up to 8'x24' pieces. I think this would be enough to do an Overlander floor in one piece.
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Old 08-14-2008, 05:11 AM   #17
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Previous people have investigated it and found the nyloboard needed more support than plywood, because it is more flexible. Did you have to add extra support under the nyloboard, and if not do you feel any flexing when walking around on it? I would like to use it (or a similar product) to replace the walls on my horse trailer when I rebuild it.

I went with marine plywood. I figured it was probably better than the stuff it replaced, which lasted the first 40 years. If it lasts another 40 it won't be my problem when it fails - I'll be 80!
Hi Stephanie; We have tried Nyloboard in a aluminum boat decking and flooring. Well, I had to re-do my $3000.00 job free of charge with plywood. The stuff got to be like jelly in the summer sun. It warped to no end, carpet glue softened and dissolved. High rate of expansion in the summer heat made it impossible to walk on. It may be OK in controlled environment but I would not use it in AS, for one reason. The floor will be attached to metal frame which has low expansion rate. Fasteners holding it, will not allow for high expansion rate and material will have to expand somewhere. In the high heat the floor will soften up and buckle, turning into unsuspected tripping device.

In my restored 26' Arg. sub floor I used a OMEGA Brand Sign Board 1/2".
It is glued with waterproof glue and has a aluminum skin on booth sides.
Supported at ends of the 8' length, I can stand in the center of the sheet with only 1.5" deflection. I have encapsulated all open edges with 1/2" X 1/2" aluminum "C" trim from McMaster-Carr. Sheets were joined with "H" trim from the same supplier. All trim was installed using a Fast Cure 3M 5200 permanent adhesive. No water can ever enter the sub floor. For sound and insulation we have glued down 1/4" cork underlayment using a adhesive in spray form named Star Stuk Clear HM by NorthStar Chemicals, Inc. This stuff is the best I ever used. The 12" x 12" urethane finished cork tiles were made by JELINEK and were glued down with water borne adhesive on top of the underlayment. We love the feel of the cork while barefoot.
Natural Cork resist mildew and mold, what else would you want? Thanks, "Boatdoc"
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Old 08-14-2008, 11:49 AM   #18
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The floor will be attached to metal frame which has low expansion rate. Fasteners holding it, will not allow for high expansion rate and material will have to expand somewhere. In the high heat the floor will soften up and buckle
Boatdoc,

From your description... your experiences seem extreme relative to the stated material properties. The coefficients of linear thermal expansion are .000033 in/in/deg F for Nyloboard and .0000055 for steel. Per my calculations the differential expansion rate would be less than 1/32" per foot for a 90 deg temperature swing. This could easily be accommodated within the standard 1/16" over sized holes in the steel cross members. One could even use Teflon washers to ensure the differential movement as req'd.
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Old 08-14-2008, 12:54 PM   #19
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From an engineering perspective the question I have is, "Why"? Marine-grade plywood properly treated and installed has a number of characteristics which I think would generally favorable to a trailer subfloor, even under the bathroom. Perhaps if you could outline what you would expect from the manmade material, forum members could be of more help on alternatives.
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Old 08-15-2008, 05:28 AM   #20
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Boatdoc,

From your description... your experiences seem extreme relative to the stated material properties. The coefficients of linear thermal expansion are .000033 in/in/deg F for Billboard and .0000055 for steel. Per my calculations the differential expansion rate would be less than 1/32" per foot for a 90 deg temperature swing. This could easily be accommodated within the standard 1/16" over sized holes in the steel cross members. One could even use Teflon washers to ensure the differential movement as rec'd.
Hi microphone; Your technical data sheet on which you base your theory can work in theory. I have spent over four decades working with different materials and I have learned that any data sheet is only a data sheet to sell. Much like the chemical manufacturers who want me to purchase 55 gallon drum of cleaner that will do it all. When I ask for a sample to test, they do not have any small containers available and hang up the phone. I do not mean to project such negative view on our marketplace but there are still salespersons who will sell you Brooklyn Bridge for a hundred bucks. Personal experiences with any product is what I believe in, after being bitten hundreds of times, and then wisdom takes over. Being of my age, I have gained lot of it.

My point is to stay with the KISS rule. Do I believe in technical data sheets? NO. While I worked with nyloboard of another manufacturer and the product may differ somewhat, but it is still same base product. Based on my past experience, would I take a chance to replace the entire floor in my AS which requires enormous amount of work? NO, unless I have tested the conformity to the technical data sheet. The oversize holes the Teflon washers are just another layer of butter and jelly to mask the taste of a stale bread. If I am going to spend a thousand bucks on sub floor material and two hundred hours of labor, the data sheet better be on the money. Chance it anyway? NO WAY.

Now let's review the facts related to plywood. There are many differences in marine plywood. One major difference is in number of plies. Two, it is glued water proof glue [not water resistant]. Third, marine ply has no voids, even on the interior plies. Four, there are different grades of top layers. Some very nice grain on booth sides for clear finish such as varnish. Some one side fancy grain, and others for non transparent finishes. The integrity of product is almost the same, but top layers differ. One does not need to spend top dollar to purchase top quality grain on both sides because you will never see it anyway. The problem is that once you ask for marine plywood the supplier will sell you the most expensive ply. Large companies, such as Harbor Sales of Baltimore MD, stock few different grades because they sell more than anyone else.
Another product that can solve many problems is laminates finished with sheet of aluminum top and bottom such as product called SIGN BOARD.
It is made for direct outdoor use for road signs where it is totally unprotected for years. This was my choice for that reason. With all edges and screws sealed with 3M 5200 no water and or moisture can enter the wood. It is very stiff, do not have to seal it with epoxy or paint and is cheaper than top grade of marine plywood.

My point is to keep things simple, with old reliable methods rather than take a chance on relying on data sheets of new product which made be the best thing ever, or may be not. Someone may want to try it and someone should, but I am done being the Guinea Pig. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
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Old 08-15-2008, 06:32 AM   #21
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In principal I agree with Boatdoc - I would use a product with a proven track record and marine plywood is just such a product. If you wanted it completely waterproof you could always treat it with CPES (or even Thompson's WaterSeal).

Having said that, there is a marine product called Coosa Board that is a manmade waterproof structural replacement for plywood which has been used in higher end yachts for more than 5 years now and you might consider it.
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Old 08-15-2008, 08:33 AM   #22
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Hi microphone; Your technical data sheet on which you base your theory can work in theory.... While I worked with nyloboard of another manufacturer and the product may differ somewhat, but it is still same base product.
Boatdoc,

I'm not sure how I became "microphone" but the quote is mine so I will respond.

Are you saying that the material you used is not the product manufactured by Nyloboard LLC of Covington,GA? The product and the characteristics you describe seem very different than the product I am familiar with.
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Old 08-15-2008, 10:17 AM   #23
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Boatdoc,

I'm not sure how I became "microphone" but the quote is mine so I will respond.

Are you saying that the material you used is not the product manufactured by Nyloboard LLC of Covington,GA? The product and the characteristics you describe seem very different than the product I am familiar with.
Hi byamcaravanner; Sorry about it, and to tell you the truth I have no idea how [microphone] got on to your quote. In reference to nyloboard try to understand that all plastics are what they are, plastics. They contain the same base material. While proprietary specs may differ, I just wanted to point out that I personally would measure it while it is cold and then expose it to 100 degree direct sun. While the product will never see the sun in AS but the temps inside the belly pan however can reach over 120 degree. The related bubbling may have been related to exposure to the difference in temps sun on top, and cooled by water air, from underneath.
All in all, I would still run the test before installing it. I do not dispute manufacturers data sheet, but I would perform a test before I accept any figures posted on data sheets. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
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Old 08-15-2008, 10:33 AM   #24
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"In reference to nyloboard try to understand that all plastics are what they are, plastics. They contain the same base material."...really??? ...only in "theory".
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Old 08-17-2008, 03:33 PM   #25
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I am not an engineering technician or a chemist, but I was the one who found Nyloboard and put it in my bathroom in my airstream. I felt really bad when I read a thread about some one who put nyloboard in their boat and it melted from the sun. I have the piece I cut my floor out of sitting in my yard. It has been sitting there for several months. It has had the sun beat on it all summer and it looks just like it did when I bought it. After reading the thread about the nyloboard melting. I opened the back area of my airstream where my plumbing is to check for melting damage. My airstream sat out in the Georgia heat all summer and the board still looks and feels like it did the day I bought it. I guess I have been lucky so far.

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Old 08-17-2008, 04:15 PM   #26
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I felt really bad when I read a thread about some one who put nyloboard in their boat and it melted from the sun.
Brian,

Don't feel so bad... the stuff boatdoc used was not Nyloboard, but a similar product.

The experience that you have had is more like what I would expect based on my analysis of the sample I have.
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