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Old 10-03-2006, 10:04 PM   #15
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We replaced our old flooring (old asbestos type lineoleum tiles, I think...) when we redid the floor. We put in vinyl wall to wall. One item you might think of ~ if you remove the old flooring and then reinstall the cabinetry your screw holes and/or rivits for the wall will be slightly off. (the thickness of the old floor) It may make for reinstallation of the cabinets a little tricky. Our old floor was under the cabinets so we reinstalled everything that way. We have been happy with the vinyl so far. Muddy feet and wet boots make a bit of a mess, but it is easily cleaned up. I have throw rugs that cover most of the surface and they can be tossed in the washer. Mostly the answers will be personal preference.

Mrs. NorCal Bambi (traveling in S Tardis)
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Old 10-06-2006, 05:38 PM   #16
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Thumbs up trying to figure out the proceedure with a new floor

Hello.
I'm a bit confused when it comes to the subfloor and when to add a second floor and when to epoxy it. This is what my plan is, cause I am in a similar boat right now with our 72 Tradewind.
When is it necessary to apply a thin layer of plyboard on top of the already there floor? Only when it's warped and bumpy? I'm also planning on using Armstrong imperial tiles cut down to 9x9. my agenda was to

1. epoxy the floor thats there and replace the two areas that are below the vista views where leaks have caused some rot

2. seal that first wood floor layer with west systems epoxy - straight

3. lay down a thin plywood subfloor for the tiles to stick too, and staple gun this to the original plyboard.

4. treat the second layer of plywood perhaps with the same epoxy?

5. throw down the adhesive, and the tiles. and viola.

somebody please tell me if this is a step too many and iff im going overbeard of if there is anything that doesnt need be done, or If I'm missing something. I'm about to jump in this weekend.

Thanks.

p.s.

sorry i hope this isnt considerd hijacking. i was just a bit confused.
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Old 10-06-2006, 06:53 PM   #17
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harestream,

I don't know why you can't do it that way. The only thing I would skip is the epoxy on the second layer of plywood. I wouldn't use Luan plywood under tile.

I used 6 mil poly for a vapor barrier, instead of epoxy.

I don't know the name of the 1/4" underlayment that I used, but it wasn't Luan, it was some type of SPF material.

I used a regular primer on the underlayment, then the adhesive and the Armstrong VCT. I used the full 12x12, but I plan to overlay the visable parts with cork, so appearance isn't an issue.

Can't report on the long term durability of this method, only completed it a few months ago.
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Old 10-06-2006, 09:48 PM   #18
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Yes, that sounds close to what I would think!
Personally, I would use the West Epoxy thinned out with Denatured Alcohol, this turns the Epoxy to a viscosity similar to water. Apply the thinned out mixture a number of times until the Plywood will accept no more. Now you may not need another layer of Plywood. You may be able to wash this area with soap and water to remove the waxy surface that comes after the Epoxy cures. Then a light sand and off you go with the squares.
If you feel like another layer of Plywood I would prefer a Douglass Fir and then I would also prefer to laminate it to the original Plywood Floor and use Screw type Fasteners rather than staples so the there is some clamping pressure to eliminate voids.
If you chose to laminate a second layer of Plwoood then use one of the Laminating Additives with the Epoxy.
I question the Second Layer of Plywood if the First Layer can be properly repaired.
Steve
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Old 10-06-2006, 10:08 PM   #19
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Harestream:

Although the floor of my 1976 Argosy was in excellent shape I put a layer of luan down using PL flooring cement and a pneumatic stapler.

Then I used the West System epoxy, two coats, before laying MARMOLEUM linoleum wall to wall.

It made for a beautiful job.


Sergei
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Old 10-07-2006, 02:00 AM   #20
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Hi Sergei,,, your flooring looks great,,, glad to see progress,,, dieterdog
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Old 10-07-2006, 07:49 AM   #21
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Thanks for your feedback guys. wow your floor looks great! I love the color! Ok, so what im gathering then is to do the following.

1. i think ill add a second layer of thin plywood (the guy at home depot said if we were going to use armstrong tiles then to use the luan) what do home depot people know though... we plan to not treat the under/original layer and screwing a top layer on top. (our main concern is that if we wanted to ever change/replace our tile, that we can lift it out without damaging the original floorboard, thus not having to replace the whole flloor.

2. put on a few coats of the west epoxy with some sort of laminating epoxy (any name I should look for? any recipie for this?) mixed in with it

3. sand, and throw the squares on.

this seems a bit easier than my original game plan. and sounds like it might work better.

thanks.
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Old 10-08-2006, 08:32 AM   #22
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Hi,
we bought vinyl tiles, everything is cut and fit in place very well,
but reading the thread I know wondering if I should go with a subfloor or if I should permanently glue the tiles on the original floor, wich is in good shape.
thnaks
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Old 10-08-2006, 08:49 AM   #23
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Wait, think about adding a layer of foil insulation between the luan and old floor!
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Old 10-08-2006, 09:41 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dufferin
Hi,
we bought vinyl tiles, everything is cut and fit in place very well,
but reading the thread I know wondering if I should go with a subfloor or if I should permanently glue the tiles on the original floor, wich is in good shape.
thnaks
There were three reasons I added a 1/4" underlayment on top of my subfloor.

1. The subfloor had some dimples in it from agressive tightening of the elevator bolts. You can see that in the seam between the wheel wells, below.

2. I was concerned about "ripping" of linoleum at the subfloor seams. Since I went to tile instead, this is less of a concern.

3. I wanted to be able to remove the floor at some future date if I didn't like it. I used 3/4" staples, so prying up the underlayment would easier than removing tile.

None of these reasons may apply to your project.

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Old 10-08-2006, 11:00 AM   #25
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harestream,
The best part about the West System Epoxy is that there are many many fillers that can be purchased to mix with the Epxoy and modify it's use.
There are fillers to laminate. The best thing is to get one of the brochures and then buy what you need. Here is a link to West System Epoxy;
http://www.westsystem.com/

There is also a Dealer Locator here.
Steve
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:48 PM   #26
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thanks for the west systems link. well I came back from Home Depot, of course didnt get my project started (i didnt know you couldnt buy the fun colored tiles at home depot unless you special order by the BOX) - so i have to find another way to buy a few tiles of a few colors.. anyways. i bought some luan and also a 4x8 of some 3/4" to replace my rot spots. I like the idea of a flooring cement that I can put down between the old subfloor and the new luan 1/4 layer. I also have screws that i plan on using. Does anybody have a flooring cement they could reccomend that will work well with the layers?
also, must I treat the luan with anything before putting down the adhesive for the tiles? is this when the west systems is supposed to come into play?
thanks to all. Hope you all had a productive airstream rehabbing weekend.

-Kelly
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Old 10-08-2006, 08:05 PM   #27
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Adding a layer of 1/4" luan or anything like it will not strenthen the floor much.

I would and did use the west system but I put down a layer of 6 OZ fiberglass cloth then put the epoxy resin on it until it all looked wetted out.

Now I can jump up and down on it, it is way more stable and water proof.

You can put tile or pergo or anything else you wish to do.

I'm laying down a 1/4" layer of Promax foil bubble R-14 insulation, then pergo.

Normally you put down a layer of blue foam with Pergo, the insulation takes its place.
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Old 11-07-2007, 12:40 PM   #28
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a question

May I chime in with a question or two?
We are at the stage to put in new flooring. I have run the gamut in ideas from cork (my first choice) to marmoleum. Right now cost is definitely an issue, especially with a 34'.
The PO had put in a parquet floor - badly - which we tore out. He used so much glue that we dug quite a few chunks in the subfloor trying to remove it.

We now have decided to use the Armstrong tiles. The cost is good, it will hold up to my two dogs, and will not be affected if the AS leaks. ( I have great concerns about that with any flooring based on MDF).

Now, should we put down some luan to even out the floor? Or use a leveling product instead? I am leaning toward the luan, but my husband isn't; he is concerned about height. But with the luan and the tile I can't imagine this would be any higher than the original carpet.

What say you?
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