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Old 01-03-2011, 06:18 PM   #1
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Is it a 'do over' ??

My ambition may have exceeded my knowledge (not the first time). I removed 3 feet / total width of the rear floor in my AS. Removed all of the rotten OSB in the chanel and left the screws in place. In stead of trying to fit the new plywood into the chanel, I placed 5/8 green treated wood strips in the chanel. I then cut the new plywood to fit up to the chanel, filled in around the screws, wood strips, and space between new plywood with caulk. Screwed plywood into the frame members in 10 different locations. Now, after reading posts in this form I wonder if working the new plywood in around the scews would add to the trailer's integrity enough to re-do the whole job. BTW I replaced the fiberglass in the floor with 1" of blue strofoam with gaps filled in with the expanding spray foam to seal air leaks.
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Old 01-03-2011, 06:23 PM   #2
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Old 01-03-2011, 07:07 PM   #3
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green wood+ aluminum= big problems

sheet goods not continuous= big problems
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Old 01-03-2011, 08:51 PM   #4
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I think you'll find that everyone here will agree that you need to do it over again. As Frank states, the green wood contains copper (correct me if I am wrong), and will cause major corrosion with the aluminum. The monocoque design of an airstream requires that the integrity of the floor, frame, and shell all be a strong unit. The non continuous boards will have little strength compared to a sheet of plywood.

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Old 01-04-2011, 04:05 AM   #5
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perfectly stated.
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Old 01-04-2011, 05:36 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by soldiermedic View Post
I think you'll find that everyone here will agree that you need to do it over again. As Frank states, the green wood contains copper (correct me if I am wrong), and will cause major corrosion with the aluminum. The monocoque design of an airstream requires that the integrity of the floor, frame, and shell all be a strong unit. The non continuous boards will have little strength compared to a sheet of plywood.
The 5/8" plywood is continuous all the way to the chanel. I was hoping that was enough. If I understand other postings, their new plywood went in around exisiting screws in the chanel. Does the extra bit of plywood in the chanel add a lot of needed strength despite not being fastened in the chanel? If so, I guess i'm in for a long weekend. Thanks for the info everyone. I should have read the posts BEFORE starting this repair
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Old 01-04-2011, 07:51 AM   #7
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[QUOTE=tvanwave;933614]
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Originally Posted by soldiermedic View Post
I think you'll find that everyone here will agree that you need to do it over again. As Frank states, the green wood contains copper (correct me if I am wrong), and will cause major corrosion with the aluminum. The monocoque design of an airstream requires that the integrity of the floor, frame, and shell all be a strong unit. The non continuous boards will have little strength compared to a sheet of plywood.

The 5/8" plywood is continuous all the way to the chanel. I was hoping that was enough. If I understand other postings, their new plywood went in around exisiting screws in the chanel. Does the extra bit of plywood in the chanel add a lot of needed strength despite not being fastened in the chanel? If so, I guess i'm in for a long weekend. Thanks for the info everyone. I should have read the posts BEFORE starting this repair
Loosly defined, an AS monocoque build, the shell is part of the floor is part of the frame as far as structural support goes. The typical SOB is a shoebox sitting on a skateboard (no structural integrity other than to support it's own box construction).

Anything you do to interrupt the strength between the floor and shell, or floor and frame, will significantly harm structural integrity. They must be "locked" as one piece or structure.
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Old 01-04-2011, 07:56 AM   #8
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So basically the previous person working on it took out the rotted wood. When it was replaced, the wood was notched where the old bolts were that attached it to the frame?

This is oddly familiar as my trailer must have had the same person working on it. Was it anything like this pic below from my old 53 Flying Cloud?



When bolted through channel, floor, frame, and riveted to the shell, the strength is considerable.


By not having the whole sheet of plywood and using the small strips, you have less area for the stress, flexing, and pressure of movement to be distributed. This could lead to failure.

Also, the shell when connected to the floor channel and frame is actually holding up that floor when you walk on it. If you don;t have the plywood underneath it to the outriggers and connected to channel, you could run the risk of breaking parts of the floor.

These are only my experiences during my time here and the rebuild of my old 53. There are others with infinite more experience who can assist you further. My old blog as seen below in my sig chronicles the 53 up till i was forced to sell it. Feel free to look at the trials, tribulations, screw ups, etc.Steve
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:51 AM   #9
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I have a similar problem coming up. Smaller area. I think it would be worth it to you to do it over. I am going to cut the plywood into 2 piecies and try to get the edge of the plywood into the channel. Then double the plywood from underneath over enough area to really make a good joint where the cut in the panel is.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:56 AM   #10
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You know i was wondering with all the floor problems why don't people use 5/8 aluminum sheating? Rip the shell off and go for it wile your in there box the hell out of the frame and stick it all backtogether. I am cosidering it on my 31'er
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Old 01-04-2011, 11:21 AM   #11
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You know i was wondering with all the floor problems why don't people use 5/8 aluminum sheating? Rip the shell off and go for it wile your in there box the hell out of the frame and stick it all backtogether. I am cosidering it on my 31'er
Maybe one reason is expense.

A quick look found 5/8 aluminum plate at MetalsDepotŪ - 3003 & 6061 Aluminum Plate. A 4x8 foot sheet is $1,270.08.

Then there is weight, .625x40x96=2,880 cubic inches of aluminum, or 1.667 cubic feet. Aluminum weighs 169 pounds per cubic foot (How to Calculate the Weight of an Aluminum Plate | eHow.com) yielding a total weight of 281.667 pounds for a 4x8 foot sheet of 5/8 aluminum plate.
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Old 01-04-2011, 11:24 AM   #12
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Why 5/8? Building a battleship? Sal.
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Old 01-04-2011, 02:37 PM   #13
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Typo

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...

Then there is weight, .625x40x96=2,880 cubic inches of aluminum, or 1.667 cubic feet. Aluminum weighs 169 pounds per cubic foot (How to Calculate the Weight of an Aluminum Plate | eHow.com) yielding a total weight of 281.667 pounds for a 4x8 foot sheet of 5/8 aluminum plate.
Should have been .625x48x96=2,880. Oops.
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Old 01-04-2011, 03:16 PM   #14
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So THAT's how they make different length Airstreams. They use different width sheets, then cut off the left over frame!
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