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Old 06-21-2012, 09:48 PM   #15
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Tony,

Don't despair--not every fix-up job turns into a shell-off! Drop the belly pan and have a look at what you have--you'll have to do that (at least the rear part) anyway in order to get set up for the grey tanks.

I checked out your wood work--very impressive stuff. Just remember (when considering weight), that your Airstream was configured with flimsy furnishings as much for weight reduction as for cost.
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Old 06-21-2012, 11:03 PM   #16
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No, not in despair. That is the plan, drop belly pan and see what I find. Thanks for the vote of confidence. Like I said above I do have guys with skills needed showing a wiliness to back me up.

Yes, weight is foremost in my mind. I even considered using cedar like a strip canoe. However, I am considering the darkness of using it

Thanks for checking out my work.

Tony

Rogue River, Oregon
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:47 AM   #17
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I think you need to put Airstream is a historical context. In the 1960's things were still made to last, be repaired, and or refurbished. The craftsmanship and materials demonstrate this. Then as the 1970's started we as a nation were embracing the disposable revolution. Unfortunately the steel used in Airstream construction suffered from this change in mind set. It is made of a very inexpensive alloy. The ability for it to resist oxidation is almost non existent. The paint put on to protect it had virtually zero effect also. When opening up a 1960's frame it not uncommon to find a frame with virtually zero rust(except the expected spots), I never open up a 1970's frame expecting to see anything but. Seeing intact out riggers is a surprise not expected for me. That said, I really love the lines of the 1970's units.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:58 AM   #18
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In the early 70's it seems like everyone was experimenting with cheap steel.
That was the same time period where new vehicles were rusting out so fast that body panels were still covered by warranty.
In northeast Ohio I remember the local dealers receiving full truck loads of pick up beds on a regular basis.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:34 AM   #19
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I understand about the steel. I have and had many old woodworking tools 1960’s and earlier and they could get wet and not immediately rust up. The new stuff you leave a block of construction lumber on it over night and you start to see rust.

So what is the implication of 70's frames for a restoration? I don’t want to build my house in the sand during the summer with such a large money outlay.

I posted this video in an earlier post and wonder does his great effort have merit or is their any precautionary notes stiffing his frame up so much. Is there lack of flex issues or anything?

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Old 06-22-2012, 10:43 AM   #20
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This video might be better. He also mentions his Polymax flooring.

Airstream Rear sag fix poly floor - YouTube

Tony
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Old 06-22-2012, 11:03 AM   #21
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Seems like a lot of work to make the frame a little stiffer. The shell helps hold up the frame, but when the floor rots out there is nothing holding up the frame. Like what happened to mine..

I had some 3/16 bent into an "L" shape. and welded it inside the frame rail in 4' lengths. 8' on either side. Started in the middle of the axles and went back 8'. This stopped pretty much all flex in the rear of the frame. I had the top 1 3/4 and then down the side was 4 1/4. I put a continuous weld along the top and 4" tack welds on the sides.

This guy went a little over kill on all the bracing. All you need to to is beef up the main rails running from front to back. you can see what I did in my thread I posted earlier.
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Old 06-24-2012, 04:55 PM   #22
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my frame on my 69 was in really bad shape, the backend was a write off up to the second to last outrigger, from 16 outriggers 12 were rusted out, the front under the rails was gone and the cross beams between the main rails by the axles were bent as if the axle was not working anīd the cross members took the hit, so I decided to build a new beefed up frame. if your frame is o.k i would certainly beef it up a bit as my personal belief is that the frame is rather flimsy and the main support comes from the flooring itself, as for the monocoque the jury is out for me on that one i still don't believe that the support that my shell could give to the frame would be off any value as half of the rails don't even go to the floor!
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:14 AM   #23
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I am struggling with similar questions. I am down to the frame on my 75
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-LAh7_LnUsh...0/100_0808.JPG
so what would be best for frame reinforcement? putting a c channel inside the original main frame C channel or is it better to box it in? or both?
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Old 06-25-2012, 05:43 PM   #24
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dkrukosky - that is an excellent question worthy of its own post...
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Old 06-26-2012, 01:20 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkrukosky View Post
I am struggling with similar questions. I am down to the frame on my 75
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-LAh7_LnUsh...0/100_0808.JPG
so what would be best for frame reinforcement? putting a c channel inside the original main frame C channel or is it better to box it in? or both?

c channel is the easiest but heaviest option and i'm not sure haw you'd go about painting that , boxing in is definately the lightest way to go but a little more work for sure, i would go for boxing in, on my new frame i still have C channel but it is 24 gauge (4mm) even so it still has alot of flex in it. I had my frame galvanised which was suprisingly cheap and definately worth looking into, it was cheaper than por-15 (here in Europe anyway!)
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:48 PM   #26
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I thought I would give a quick update of my progress on my 1973 Tradewind. I will start separate renovation post but wanted to show that with your help and encouragement I have moved forward. I still have a section of belly pan to drop but I have pulled the fresh water tank and check out around the dump valves. I have also worked on taking about the inside but I will save that.

The frame was not a rust out job that it could of been. I have been quite happy with what I have found. I pulled the fresh water tank and found some real rust on the z metal but I will take care of that after cleaning it up with Por 15. The rest is mostly only lightly rusted. The plywood under the tank was in great shape. I will sand it a bit and epoxy the edges and fill the hole where I put the eyebolt to come-a-long it out. Which went easy.

See pic. So I am making decisions on how far to go with the project and will address it later

One questions I have what is the best bet with the lightly rusted, mostly still painted, good section of the frame? Clean up a bit and rattle can Rustolem or Kyrlon ?


Anyway I have broken the ice. thanks

Tony

Rogue River, Oregon
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Old 02-12-2013, 04:00 AM   #27
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Quote:
...what is the best bet with the lightly rusted, mostly still painted, good section of the frame? Clean up a bit and rattle can Rustolem or Kyrlon ?
In Oct. 2011 I posted "Also am seeing DeRusto flat-black aerosol was very ineffective - many of the inboard spars I only quick coated since they appeared 'nearly' new now have orange rust spots blooming all over them so they are on the paint list."

I saw lots of dime sized rust 'flowers' appear within 3 years from the first time I first repainted my frame, so I'll forward a glossy sealed NEW finish is important.

The paint on my '73 frame was a hybrid asphalt/creosote undercoating, that is judging by what slung off the wire-wheel brush and stained my hands. Whatever solvent/carrier in the paint you overcoat it with will change the way the original lies AND change the paint applied. The light rust pits will continue to react under the new paint, knowing what I've seen here I'd be tempted to wield a phosphate conversion treatment before coating with anything.

Give each coats a couple of days to dry & cure thoroughly before you recoat to keep the waxes in the original paint from floating into the new layers.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:46 AM   #28
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Thanks for the reply. It is kind of where does it end before getting started.
Seriously though what is "phosphate conversion treatment before coating with anything" Is that the Por 15 Marine clean or metal ready?

Tony
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