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Old 03-29-2014, 01:35 AM   #29
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I do these cuts w/ a circular saw; I just cut on scrap plywood, and sit on the sheet .

If you take about a 1/4" deep cut it works just fine.... I cut sheet (.050 or so) this way, as well, and diamond plate and 1/8" 6061 for a battery box.


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Old 03-29-2014, 05:07 AM   #30
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Not sure that this applies to aluminum, but any time we cut any sheet steel at work the blade in the skil saw or table saw is always turned around 18o degrees from the direction the teeth run to cut wood.
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Old 03-29-2014, 06:14 AM   #31
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You can get away with the table saw method but It is very dangerous. I have seen people get ripped up pretty badly when the blade grabs the sheet and kicks it back. The method I use is the worm drive portable saw with a medium fine tooth carbide blade. First you want to make a base for the saw to ride on out of half inch plywood. screw a piece of 3/4" plywood to the half inch base for a saw edge guide. Leave the base wide enough to go from the guide edge past the blade an inch or so. Run the saw down along the edge guide (3/4" ply) and cut off the extra inch you left on. Now you have a nice saw guide for the saw to travel on that also holds the aluminum sheet down against the table while you are cutting. This method prevents the metal saw base from scratching the surface of the aluminum. Make the whole assembly wide enough that you can put your clamps on the double thick part and not hit them with any part of the saw when you run it down the guide. You need to cut on a nice flat table with the saw blade hanging over the edge of the table by 1/2" or so. The edge of the base by the blade can also be used to line everything up at the marks on the sheet where you want the cut to be. Any saw cut aluminum sheet needs to be touched up with a mill file to remove sharp edges.
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Old 03-29-2014, 06:59 AM   #32
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Cutting Aluminum Sheet Straight and Long

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingo Girl View Post
Not sure that this applies to aluminum, but any time we cut any sheet steel at work the blade in the skil saw or table saw is always turned around 18o degrees from the direction the teeth run to cut wood.

Exactly.

The same suggestion made in post #14. This especially good when cutting thin material and there is little risk to kickback because the blade in not biting in to the material.
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Old 03-29-2014, 07:11 AM   #33
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It is hard to cut plywood on a table saw. I prefer the skill saw method with a fence to guide it.

Perry
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Old 03-29-2014, 07:44 AM   #34
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I had a piece of AS late model "bright aluminum" (don't know the alloy #) that I cut using a Dremel Sawmax and metal blade for my stove vent project- a fix/upgrade done to deal with the heavy corrosion that was around the vent when I bought my AS. It is a one-handed tool so guiding is not too difficult. There is also a straightedge attachment but for my job I did not need it.
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Old 03-30-2014, 09:59 AM   #35
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Metal Brake on Amazon.

I'm guessing this is too light duty for .040 at 4 feet wide?

What if i went down to .036?

Amazon.com: Malco MB48A 48-inch Portable Brake: Home Improvement

Malco MB48A 48-inch Portable Brake

"
Bends up to 135 degrees in 22 gauge galvanized sheet metal
Bends metal roofing components and roof flashing including copper and aluminum
Bends narrow roof-flashing strips
Ideal for fabricating plenums or large transitions at the job site
Makes compact fabrications as small as a 4-inch square
Accommodates sheet metal up to 4 feet wide
Adjustable strengthening ribs
"
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