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Old 10-24-2013, 10:15 PM   #15
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1964 26' Overlander
Richmond , Virginia
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Not quite breaking the spine. I could notch it, but. Then I'd have to vent both sides of a shallow tank. Hanging it below destroys an original belly pan. That little spine should have little effect, and the thickness of the tank should make up for the loss of a inch by 1/32 thick piece of steel.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:10 PM   #16
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Richmond , Virginia
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So, an update. I have more pics I need to load, and maybe some video. To Channing's question, the notches would have created air pockets, at least on one side. Since the capacity on these was only 14 gallons, and less than that since I chose to drain out of the side instead of the bottom, and couldn't get the fitting low enough, I didn't want to jeopardize anything. I think the floor is actually siff enough. I only cut 2 of the ribs, and replaced it with a abs box, so I think it may be a net zero on the rigidity.

The tanks are connected to the lines with rubber couplings. That adds some flex, made it easy to drop the tanks, and the black rubber will never see the light of day, so it should last pretty long.

Here's a huge tip if you want to build your own tanks. Use lots of ABS cement. Glue all the flat pieces, then run the abs welds on them. I had no leaks where I joined the boxes with cement and ran a bead inside and out, then slathered on the cement. The problems were the tops actually. It was a heat weld, and then an abs slurry on the outside. It just didn't hold. Both tanks leaked when they were filled to capacity as the water pressure broke the weak bond. I think the heat bond is much weaker than the chemical bond.

So, I took both tanks down, and then I put rubber caps on the drain sections, and put my shop vac with a tapered nozzle into the top where the vent goes in and hooked it up to the blower side. It is a LOT of pressure, more so than the water. It ballooned the tank up quite a bit, possibly expanding the middle from 4 inches to 8 under pressure. I could feel the broken seams just blowing water at me. Then, I put it on suction, That collapsed the tank and opened up those broken seams. I then slathered those seams 3 or 4 times with the cement while on suction. that sucked the chemical inside the seam. I then turned off the vacuum, and the crack closed up. I let that cure, and rechecked, did it again. Then I reversed the vacuum to blower and did a soap bubble test. Found a couple pin hole leaks, and then finally, completely air tight at the highest sustained pressure.

As far as tank supports, I ran some hurricane banding under the tanks, holding it to the floor with elevator bolts that were epoxied in from the top, but recessed to hide under the new tile foor. Even full of water, supported at every 12 inches, the 1/4" black abs barely flexed.

rob.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:25 PM   #17
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Can't wait to see the pictures, looks like a job well done.
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:44 PM   #18
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1964 26' Overlander
Richmond , Virginia
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I updated a few things on my page here, page 8 I think: http://www.airforums.com/forums/f157...ml#post1577719

One thing I'll add, in the rear, the tank takes up a lot of room under the floor. As a result, there isn't a lot of floor support - technically it is missing a cross member underneath. I grabbed an idea from housing - the attic load bearing beam. You put a beam in the attic, then hang joist hangers off of it for the first floor ceiling - then you can have an opening to another room, load bearing, without having that beam in your face. Same thing here. Get a piece of angle iron, or even U channel, put it on top of the floor, then put elevator bolts under the floor from the belly pan side. Glue them in, and you'll have bolts sticking up into your living space. Slide the angle iron over them, and you now are "hanging" your floor from steel channel, because you can't put it underneath as the black tank is in the way. This only works if you have something that allows you to hide this steel - like a rear bench.
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