Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-19-2018, 07:34 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,477
Hey, if you can use it and repair it as you go, I'm all for it! Little Girl was definitely a gut job project due to partial gut before we bought her, and the disrepair inside. We had planned on that, though, which is why she was the perfect purchase for us. We think the odor was a combination of insulation in the walls, soft stuff in the trailer (mattresses, etc) and the floor due to mice in the trailer. We definitely had mice runs and storage facilities in the wall cavities (and a snake skin in the water heater).
Yes, you will need to dismantle the bathroom to take the rear floor out and repair. We did total shell on floor replacement of the whole trailer. Shell off would be easier, but then you're dismantling the whole thing, and time would not be on your side.
If you can instill camping in your 11 year old now, he'll go when older. Our kids used tents (for more separation from Parents) when they were teenagers when we camped. Now the oldest 2 camp with their children. Youngest hasn't convinced her hubby yet. It'll come.
Good luck!

Kay
__________________

Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 07:55 AM   #16
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
Hi Gary, Kay,
Thanks for the responses! Gary, we are not too far from you. I will send a pm with my cell number -- maybe we can share tips.
Kay, I am so glad you wrote what you did. We have a great relationship with our son, but I worry that he will go the way I did, which was to not be very close with my parents for about 5 or so years. Every kid is different, though...
We also had critters in the ceiling/walls. I am less sure about the floor. I hope to repair the rear floor and pull the interior skin to clean everything, re-insulate and put it back. Do you have any recollection of how many hours went into those two phases? I am trying to budget my time...


Thanks,
David
__________________

2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 09:02 AM   #17
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 479
Take your time!

I'm in total agreement with the other posters that said roadworthiness was paramount with Airstream reno. The wife and I traveled around in our project for two years before it was "completed". As long as you have a safe trailer, and it doesn't stink on the inside, I believe that I have all of the Forum's permission to tell you "Go out and have fun with your family". You can always cook on a Coleman stove and poo in the woods!

Even if your trailer is a hollow shell, it's still better than a tent, you have all of your stuff with you, and fodder for hours of design debates. Perhaps this is a good way to bond with your kid? If everyone has a say in the design, you can hack something together, try it out, and have further design discussions about the outcome. You can share learning new skills together, as you point and sketch and tape cardboard into place. If you collectively decide on a decorating theme, say "Star Trek" or "Old West" or " Gilligan's Island Shack", even the unhandy can have fun searching for fabric patterns, or bric-a-brack to include.

As you get further into your trailer, more nastiness will show up. It's the nature of this sort of project. If every discovery is a "setback", keeping you from an unrealistic goal, that is a sure recipe for burnout, my friend. Keep a steady course, laugh at your mistakes, and revel in your triumphs!

BTW: As I've stated before, those design discussions can be very thirsty affairs, so be sure to lay in extra supplies!
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 10:15 AM   #18
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi All,
So true, Suz, so true. We have been camping in a tent trailer (an awesome, if cold Coleman from the late 1980's), so we are already equipped and used to cooking outside and using whatever facilities are near. And you cannot underestimate the value of the local climate (we are camping at the ocean, only 45 minutes away), which is almost always tolerable, if not downright pleasant.
I love the idea of getting the entire family's input on design. Ultimately, I think they will gladly sign up for a version of what you did, if not a near copy. For now, if I have some luck on my side and more patience than I normally possess, I hope to re-use the existing bathroom fixtures and layout. My wife and I will sleep up front on the gaucho, and our son (and probably guest) will sleep on the twins.
Since I know for a fact that critters were in the ceiling, I am guessing that the sanitary thing to do will be to pull ALL of the interior panels, correct? Any estimate at all of how long that takes? I am fairly efficient (and, in the words of Jeff Spiccoli "have an awesome set of tools"), but I have absolutely no experience in this. I would put everything back for now, in the interest of time -- if I have enough time :-) Otherwise, camping in the shell may be exactly what we are doing...

Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 01:45 PM   #19
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,477
Um, I want to say the walls came down in a morning or so. Be sure to label each piece with placement and "which way is up" as it comes down. Insulating for us was another probably day, and replacing panels another dayish. You will probably not be able to exactly line up holes to replace, but you can use the existing holes in wall panels to drill if holes don't line up with the holes in the ribs. Front and rear interior segments are a 2 - 3 person endeavor: they're floppy and hard to hold in place and rivet at the same time.
Putting up insulation kinda depends on what insulation you go with. We used fiberglass, and stuck it in place with spray adhesive until we got the panels back in place. I think Prodex or Reflectix takes longer from what others have posted. It is also more expensive but gives you more R value. We're more the summer camper types right now, so R value wasn't so tremendously important at the time we did our trailer. Money was.
I think your trailer is a little shorter than ours, so that would be an advantage time wise.
Every kid is different. They all want to go their own way at some point (which is what you're striving for. After all, you probably don't want them living with you when their 40). It's hard, though, when you see them leave. I think keeping communication open and being there is the most important thing. We have 3 children who are now 38, 35 and 30, and have given us 6 grandchildren. We have good relationships with all of them, even though it's been a struggle sometimes. Just keep loving him.

Kay
Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 06:32 PM   #20
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi Kay,
Great advice on kids! I will keep it in mind -- especially as we hit the teenage years :-)
I also am very grateful for the info about the amount of time it takes to do some of these items. I will not be able to devote a lot of time strictly to this project for several weeks, so lining up my resources (including time) is very important.

So far, I have gotten the sense that it will take:

2 to 3 days to get the furnishings out, including the bathroom
1 to 2 days to remove the inner skins
2 days to replace inner skins
(I am guessing) up to 2 days to replace walls, cabinets, etc.,
for a subtotal of up to 9 days...

I also need to get a best sense of replacing the rear subfloor and install a new luxury vinyl plank floor (this stuff is impervious to mold or moisture, and is much thicker than regular vinyl plank -- think engineered hardwood flooring) throughout. I also need to service the wheel bearings and check/reconnect the electric brakes. I am guessing:

1 to 2 days to put in the new floor
5 days to replace the subfloor, including demo
2 days for the wheels and brakes
for another subtotal of up to 9 more days...

That would mean that with a steady effort (and no major supply issues, or "life" happenings) I could feasibly have this Airstream back on the road in around 18 days (or 3 -1/2 weeks in our house, since weekends are spent running to soccer matches, etc.).

Of course, nothing ever goes as smoothly as planned, but giving myself a month or 5 weeks seems reasonable -- at least right now

How far off are the estimates above? I understand that it can easily go much longer for any given phase, but are the SHORT END estimates at all realistic? I could try to get on it as soon as possible, knowing that there will be a disaster or 4 waiting for me. By taking this approach, at least I hope I will leave some time to make up for those unforeseen delays...


Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 07:43 PM   #21
Rivet Master
 
dbj216's Avatar

 
1986 34' Limited
1975 27' Overlander
Conifer , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,800
Images: 1
I find reassembly takes much longer than disassembly. I would add more time to the reassembly phase.

David
__________________
WBCCI #8607
VAC Region 11

Link to my 1975 Overlander Improvement Journal:
https://www.airforums.com/forums/f17...ml#post2053792
dbj216 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2018, 11:15 PM   #22
Rivet Master
 
1970 25' Caravanner
Incline Village , Nevada
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 516
David. Certainly not an expert but am 2 months ahead of you on restoration project. Much more aggressive endeavor granted but can advise to read restoration threads and other pertinent threads as what you are doing has been done many times and the information within will guide you along the way no doubt. Your disassembly estimates are close to what it took us (had 2 people working pretty aggressively 8-10 hours daily). Agree with dbj216 that your reassembly will take longer though. It's the unexpected that will hang you up. Beware the stuff you will find under that floor and the condition that could prompt other projects.
Jeremy9107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 07:45 AM   #23
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi Jeremy,
Thanks for your post. I have been scouring the forums and getting fantastic advice. The main thing I couldn't figure out was timing per step -- especially since posts might be days apart...so I am very grateful for your perspective and the perspective of others that are chiming in
I agree completely that it will be the unexpected that throws the schedule off. I am hoping to start early enough to allow at least some time to deal with those delays, but if this goes like some of the other projects I have tackled, I will still be tightening something down 3 minutes before we leave

Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 08:02 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,477
Oops, Ambassadors are longer than I realized.
Time lines always get messed up by unexpected things.
And, then there's those dreaded words by the other half: "you know, while were at it, we should..." My husband shudders when he hears that! (the other one is "I've been thinking...")
While your inner skins are out, a good scrub with them laying flat does wonders. Make sure you rinse very well, dry well, and then you can store them rolled up and secured with that plastic carpet stretch securer stuff (don't know name). Ours sat for a year that way in the garage.

Kay
Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2018, 12:19 PM   #25
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi Kay,
Great tip! I had no idea that the skins are that thin...!


Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2018, 11:22 AM   #26
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi All,
Reality is sinking in a bit further today. It has been raining here, and a quick look inside the AS is showing that my wishful thinking is giving way to the realization that there are likely many more leaks than I thought/hoped for. In addition to the plywood in the back of the coach (bath area) being pretty much gone, I should have mentioned the area near the entry door under the windows, which is also rotten to the point of plywood simply falling away.
I am certain that I will find several more points of entry for water. I am reading everything I can in the "windows and doors" section that I can in anticipation of attempting to seal as many leaks as possible before removing/replacing the floor, since a new floor won't last long if there are leaks...
Question: I view the two topics to be related, but there are different forum topic "headers". Is is considered good practice on AirForums to keep this thread going and post my questions here as I handle this other task, or should I post over in "Windows and Doors" for just those questions, or ask that this thread be moved to General Repair or some other area???? Obviously (and probably not the least bit surprisingly to those of you with experience), the scope of this repair/restoration is already becoming much larger than I initially thought, even if the goal is to keep the list as short as practical.
Color me confused...


Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2018, 09:06 PM   #27
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi All,
Well, I may have read/talked myself into a circle... I am certain that the wall/ceiling skins should be pulled because there were definitely critters in there. The floor, on the other hand, is definitely damaged in the rear bath and near the front door under the bank of windows -- at least of one of which leaks. The rest I am unsure of, and may be okay.
In the interest of time, I am now considering the following path:

1. Pull out the fixtures and walls and any other barrier to the interior skins.
2. Remove the Pergo that is currently on the floor.
3. Remove the interior skins.
4. Inspect for leaks in the ceiling/walls/windows.
5. Remove just the damaged parts of the subfloor if the total damaged area is
small.
6. Patch leaks.
7. Reassemble

How many of you have pulled up the subfloor and have found no trace of invaders? If the answer is zero, I am definitely adding pulling the entire floor to the list...

I am almost done with the remodel that is keeping me from starting the real work on the AS. All of this info is really helping me get ready and (hopefully) move quickly and decisively when I finally tear into it.


Thanks,
David
2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2018, 02:30 PM   #28
3 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Santa Rosa , California
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 208
1970 New to Us Ambassador reality check

Hi All,
Well, I already went out of order... I removed the Pergo this morning after seeing wet areas in different parts of the trailer. Here are a few pics (below)...the galvanized metal box that the tank sits in is clearly visible in one of the pictures. I was surprised that most of the floor looked like the other pics, though...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	AS subfloor from galley back.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	79.9 KB
ID:	303044   Click image for larger version

Name:	AS subfloor twin beds area.jpg
Views:	90
Size:	68.5 KB
ID:	303045  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Rotted AS bath floor .jpg
Views:	82
Size:	82.9 KB
ID:	303046  
__________________

2002sheds is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another Reality Check! RLS Hitches, Couplers & Balls 24 09-23-2009 11:38 PM
Bathroom ABS repair-Reality check SilverHoot Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 1 07-21-2009 10:02 PM
POR15 reality check truckasaurus Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 20 06-07-2009 08:19 AM
Check , Check and Re-Check a new refer saga. thenewkid64 Refrigerators 13 06-24-2002 09:54 AM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.