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Old 05-03-2014, 06:25 PM   #113
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1957 22' Caravanner
1960 26' Overlander
1963 24' Tradewind
El Paso , Texas
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Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr View Post
Here are some pics of my fixture for making the curved panel. This is bead-and-cove, but suitable bendy ply could also be wrapped around it. The second shot is of the setup that I used to make the edge details. The featherboards make for a safe and precise working experience. The last shot details the edges, and how they go together to form a curve. After my glue (Locktite PowerGrab) sets up, I'll sand down the exterior to form a smooth surface. That gets a layer of fiberglass cloth and epoxy- nice and rigid after that!
you got some serious skill mister,looks great!
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:18 PM   #114
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1985 31' Excella
near Chama , New Mexico
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I'm 30 miles north of O'keefe country. Too many O'keefe ladies down there for me. Already painted a nice adobe color with greenish turquiose windows. Navajo red door. Someday I'll figure out how to post photos. The end caps look like a compound curve similar to the face of a hyrdoelectric dam. Just make it fit. I have Aleut friends in AK who can tell me how to bend wood. You are doing an awesome job.
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:30 PM   #115
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1985 31' Excella
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:48 PM   #116
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1985 31' Excella
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:49 PM   #117
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1985 31' Excella
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I put the link to the photo in the box and, as usual, nothing happens.
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Old 05-04-2014, 07:01 PM   #118
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1981 31' Excella II
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Try a different browser.

Perry
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Old 05-05-2014, 07:58 AM   #119
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Boynton Beach , Florida
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Thanks for all of the kind words!

I was able to get the panel sanded down and glassed yesterday. I'm using epoxy, while more expensive, is far more gentlemanly to use than polyester resin. Longer working time, less odor, stronger material, less sensitive to heat/cold in the shop. Progressive Epoxy Basic No-Blush is my go-to choice, but I'm currently using the house brand from Glue Products Plus out of West Palm.

First, the dry cloth is laid down over the piece and completely smoothed down by hand. Using plastic cups, I'll mix up a small batch. I tried a coffee can once, back when I bought coffee in a can, and the metal caused a runaway heat reaction. Scary! A red beer cup is far preferable, and bathroom dixie cups make for good measuring cups. The resin is spread out with a chip brush and all excess resin is removed with a bondo spreader. The cloth should look dry, no air bubbles, stuck tight to the piece. Nitrile gloves are a necessity, as is thick plastic dropcloth, which the epoxy doesn't stick to.

I'll leave the shop for a couple-few hours, to allow the epoxy to kick. If I was to allow this coat to fully harden, sanding the cloth would make it visible, and weaken the piece. A "hot coat" is applied while the previous coat is still slightly tacky, making a good chemical bond. This morning I'll razor blade off the extra cloth overhanging the piece. When this coat fully catalyzes, there is enough of a buildup to allow for sanding. Then, two coats of varnish, and I'm done!
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:43 AM   #120
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1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
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Different curves in different places

MAN! There are some serious skills on display, here. So, I feel comfortable asking whether you have an idea about a floor trim issue....
The toilet/bathroom area in the back of my 78 Argosy Minuet is being re-arranged. I installed a composting toilet (got rid of the blackwater tank) and now have a curved section of floor (opposite the shower pan) that intersects the curved wall.
I have bamboo flooring to install, and need to hold the edge down with trim. What material could be used to: 1) hold down the floor and 2) bend enough to match the curve of the wall?

Any ideas are appreciated!

Shannon in Athens, GA
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Old 09-09-2014, 07:49 AM   #121
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MAN! There are some serious skills on display, here. So, I feel comfortable asking whether you have an idea about a floor trim issue....
The toilet/bathroom area in the back of my 78 Argosy Minuet is being re-arranged. I installed a composting toilet (got rid of the blackwater tank) and now have a curved section of floor (opposite the shower pan) that intersects the curved wall.
I have bamboo flooring to install, and need to hold the edge down with trim. What material could be used to: 1) hold down the floor and 2) bend enough to match the curve of the wall?

Any ideas are appreciated!

Shannon in Athens, GA
Hmmm.... by "hold down the floor" I'm assuming that you're installing a floating floor? I've never been able to abide them, personally. Don't like the foot feel, and flexiness. In a bathroom, you could get seepage of "moisture" underneath, causing smells and rot. I would suggest a glue-down application, that's how I'm installing my bamboo floor. Once you no longer need to hold stuff down, you could do a very precise install of the bamboo, using a drawing compass to set the curve, then use some Big Stretch caulking to seal the edge. No molding at all!

Otherwise, you'd be dealing with a compound curve, which would be a molding nightmare. I've got some spiffy software called Lamina 3D that can take a 3D model and lay it out flat (a developed surface). So the trim piece would look like a shallow curve, so that it would lay back on to the inner skin of the trailer. Do this three times, if you're using 1/8" thick stock, and glue them together in place using some sort of ad-hoc arcane clamping system. Remove when set, and carefully shape and sand it fair. Hours of work, that may or may not look fantastic when you're done. I shudder to think of it!

Here's a tip for getting a perfect curved edge on your flooring: cut as close as you can with your jigsaw, band saw or (my fav) scroll saw. To get that last bit of perfect, use a sanding disk on a hand-held 4" to 4 1/2" to split the pencil line. The grinder can also back bevel the underside so that it fits tight, tight, tight!

One man's opinion... good luck!
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