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Old 01-16-2014, 07:38 AM   #57
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Drains and things

After asking Aerowood about his vent/drain pipe (1 1/4" poly/irrigation pipe, geez that guy has some serious skills!), I got to thinking about it in greater depth. I find myself using my yacht repair skills more and more, as I think that these trailers more resemble boats than small houses. So maybe I could install "bilges" in the trailer, and use a small bilge pump to pump the gray water into the main tank? I'm thinking a 2 gal. bucket under the sink as a catch basin, then use 3/4" clear hose to the tank. It looks like I'll add a wainscot to the sides of the stateroom, which will make a dandy pipe chase to route whatever pipes and wires that I need.

Good news yesterday! When I removed all of the pipes in the way, and cut up the floor, I discovered the source of the sponginess. Turns out that the plywood had rotted away at the back, and I was walking on the black tank. The I-beams still have a lot of meat in them, and the back end isn't too saggy (1/4" in 4'). So I'll just replace the last 24" of floor, and monitor the situation.
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Old 01-18-2014, 06:38 PM   #58
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Shoji paper

Pardon the unsolicited help, but it's common on this forum...


I wholly understand your decision and determination to make a raffia door. I've done some fiberglass sheet forming, and I had best luck vacuum forming. I made a giant bag from sheet plastic and duct tape, then attached shop-vac and used a heavy roller. You might decide to celebrate the bubbles.




Alternately, there are heavy Shoji screen papers designed for outdoors. What I am especially impressed with, is not only the durability, but the light diffusion. The light diffusion is a subtlety that may have taken many generations to perfect. Japan knows paper better than I.


Following are images of how I made a replacement for the absolutely hideous melamine pocket door specified by AS in 1968. I used plasticized Shoji paper, common joinery, and clear fir. As the lites descend, their heights increase in the ratio of Phi. This door's paper application is not true to traditional Japanese method, but few are aware of the Euro-centric modification.


There may be fewer than a dozen paper patterns, but I found one that pleases me. It is quite strong, has a faintly smooth matte texture, lightweight, and very illuminating.


Not sure if this helps with your plan, but I do sympathize with your door struggle.
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Old 01-19-2014, 07:53 AM   #59
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How cool is that door! Very nice work. The pattern is very striking, and it makes the space look larger. Well done,sir!

My experiments have been going along nicely with the papers that I bought from Jerry's Artarama. They're ready for their 2nd lamination. I'll add another layer of paper, as they tend to go transparent with the epoxy, and another layer of cloth.

While I have the epoxy going, I'll laminate the blocks for the mounting rings for my front speakers and the base for my deck prism lamps. The speakers are going where the overhead bin starts to curve, therefore I need a flat surface to insure a good seal. The rings will start out at 8" X 5 1/2" X 1 1/2", then be shaped down to fit the curve. My intarsia wood carving skills will come in handy here!

The deck prisms get a 6" diameter plate with a hexagonal 4" X 4 1/2" hole cut out of it. This plate gets glued on with thickened epoxy, to keep the prism from falling out and spearing my skull in the night. I have small tupperware-like buckets that will become the housing for the LEDs that will illuminate them. Years ago, when I remodeled a Skipjack cuddy cabin boat, I put a deck prism sticking up out of the foredeck. It illuminated the interior nicely, even when installed upside down. Looked cool as all get-out. When asked about it, I would look at the person with a straight face and say, "It's what powers the boat".
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Old 01-19-2014, 08:39 AM   #60
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I just wrote a long reply and the app closed and I lost it! Argh! Great work. I thought you might be interested in a product we are using on our latest Airstream renovation. We have finally finished the non-pretty stuff, replacing. The plumbing (complete redo) and electrical (we upgraded to 50 amp and wired for additional lighting and an additional Air Conditioner) and stripped and sealed the exterior (and sealed, and sealed, and sealed-- that actually came first, root counting the running gear) and replace extensive sections of subfloor-- be sure you get yours into the c-channel-- read threads--it's structural.

I love your door ideas and the shoji material is really cool too. I wanted to point out a product called 3-form at we are using in our "new" Airstream. It is a post-consumer recycled material which is laminated plastic. They have led lighting built in in so many different ways. If you search for 3-form and 3form you'll see myriad styles and applications. It is primarily used in commercial projects, and is very pricey but they do have a "seconds" area on the website with some smaller pieces. Here are a couple of examples. Airstream uses 3-form for their sliding cabinet doors in some of their new high-end models.

Check out our read (boring so far) about our 1986 Excella 32 remodel, going from a read bed into a 2-bedroom bunkhouse. It's in the 1986 Excella section on the forums.
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Old 01-19-2014, 08:53 AM   #61
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Here's a couple more-- but their variety is limitless and they will even, for an unbelievably exorbitant fee, custom make it!
We are in Georgia if you want to come see some in real life.
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Old 01-19-2014, 05:45 PM   #62
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Yes, that 3Form stuff is fantastic, but at better than $800/sheet, plus shipping, it's out of the question. Besides, I'm having way too much fun making up my own! Just got done putting another coat of cloth, resin and paper on my sample. Then ran out of resin, so I put in an order of Basic No-Blush with epoxyproducts.com, on their massively confusing website. Maybe they've partaken of too many fumes? Got my blocks for the speakers laminated, and cut out the frames for the deck prism lights. I was able to get one almost done, so got to look at it held over a desk lamp. Gorgeous!

Some new renders of the bedroom, with the mysterious overhead bin. Still no idea as to how this thing will work! Yet another reason why I have to perfect my fiberglass panel skills- that compound curve will have the white paper treatment on the outer frame, with LEDs behind.

I've got the inner structure of the bed frame worked out, so will be able to start on that later in the week. Purchased a bunch of PEX and connectors today, and sealed off the black water tank to I don't have to look into its recesses. I'll finish up the rear floor this week- it'll be nice to have a solid trailer.

Got to the trailer somewhat habitable for Alumaflamingo in late February for our debut!
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Old 01-23-2014, 06:14 PM   #63
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My custom deck prism lights are almost complete- just need to attach the MR 11 LED lamp bases and they'll be ready. Do I need them right now? No, not really... but when an idea grabs me, I gotta see it through. The paint can housing will be hidden inside of the overhead bin, so that isn't a design feature.

The back of the trailer is cleaned up, ready for it's new floor section. Not very interesting to do, but highly necessary. All of that funky plumbing is being replaced by 3/4" vinyl tubing for the gray water waste, and PEX for the fresh. I've got the new floor brace setting about where it will go.

The mounting rings for the speakers sure were a lot of fine woodworking for something that will be covered by paint, and never be seen! I laminated some clear pine 1X6s together, and added a second layer at right angles. Cut out the rings, and then used my mini-disk grinder to eyeball the curvature. Through-bolted the frame and set it in construction adhesive. Speakers feel solid, and the frames will look great when Zolatoned. I'll temporarily install the stereo in the front overhead until I get the new kitchen overhead cabinets in, where it shall reside in splendor.
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Old 01-23-2014, 06:33 PM   #64
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It looks like the rear structure of your trailer is not it bad shape. What you going to do with that angle in there?

Perry
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Old 01-23-2014, 07:00 PM   #65
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Subscribed. Phenomenal rendering and loving the style. I saw early on you mention LED panels (I installed 8" round panels in my last house) but haven't seen anyone try them in an Airstream yet, ( I have the 4" round ones ready for a test run as soon as it gets warmer up here). I'm keen on the very very low power consumption and wanted to ask if you had a positive experience with them?
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:06 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by perryg114 View Post
It looks like the rear structure of your trailer is not it bad shape. What you going to do with that angle in there?

Perry
The angle gets screwed into the frame, with a strip of 1X on top of it. New Eurolite ply floor gets Thompson Watersealed and screwed down to the strip. I'll cut a 3" strip of the ply that will connect the new floor with the old.
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:12 AM   #67
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Subscribed. Phenomenal rendering and loving the style. I saw early on you mention LED panels (I installed 8" round panels in my last house) but haven't seen anyone try them in an Airstream yet, ( I have the 4" round ones ready for a test run as soon as it gets warmer up here). I'm keen on the very very low power consumption and wanted to ask if you had a positive experience with them?
Thanks! I haven't done the panels yet, so I'm open to anybody that has more experience than I do. I just received my order of epoxy last night, so I'll be able to finish my fiberglass panel experiments. The light panel will get mounted in a box that I'll whip up out of scrap, and line the inside with an LED strip. Then plug it in and see what happens! I'm looking for soft ambient light, and use the airplane-style bullets for task lighting.
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Old 01-24-2014, 09:46 AM   #68
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Just a suggestion here, but you really need to pull the rear inner skin from around the rear hatch. This is an area that is especially prone to corrosion. This is where you will find the rear frame to shell attach angle. The original is galvinized steel that mates up to the aluminum shell with no sealant barrier between them. After the water wicks in from the poor design and lack of sealant from the rear bumper hatch you now have a very effective battery in that area causing severe corrosion. You've gone this far already, might as well pull the trigger and go all the way to effect a really good repair.
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:19 AM   #69
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While you are at it, you may want to consider switching out the galvanized for stainless if you have access.
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:55 PM   #70
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Aerowood is right. You also need to replace the bolts and put something between the C-channel and the hold down plate. It looks like you plan on butting your floor up against that angle without doing anything to restore the sandwitch structure back there. The floor needs to go under the walls and then bolts go through the c-channel behind the inner skin, then through the floor then through the hold down plate and then into the frame. There are several bolts between the frame rails and two bigger bolts that go through the frame. Unless you fill that gap where the floor use to be, you will have the shell flopping up and down and moving relative to the frame and eventually the bolts will pull through the c-channel and you will have separation back there. Also it will be impossible to seal back there with things moving. You need to remove the rear outside trim that hides that joint as well.

It looks like the hold down plate is ok but it and the frame need some POR15 or something similar.

Perry

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Originally Posted by Aerowood View Post
Just a suggestion here, but you really need to pull the rear inner skin from around the rear hatch. This is an area that is especially prone to corrosion. This is where you will find the rear frame to shell attach angle. The original is galvinized steel that mates up to the aluminum shell with no sealant barrier between them. After the water wicks in from the poor design and lack of sealant from the rear bumper hatch you now have a very effective battery in that area causing severe corrosion. You've gone this far already, might as well pull the trigger and go all the way to effect a really good repair.
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