Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2013, 12:25 PM   #15
Rivet Master
 
Alphonse's Avatar

 
2010 28' Flying Cloud
Lower Alabama , USA
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 649
I had AutoCAD many moons ago and used it often in my work, mostly for schematics and process engineering diagrams though. I never personally did very much 3D modeling. I do have SketchUp downloaded but have never taken the time to use/learn it. I am thinking about using it for a trailer tugger/mover that I am going to build to pull my power boat in and out of the garage. By the way, McMaster Carr provides cad files of much of the hardware they sell and I will use them for my tugger pieces and parts (chain, sprockets, axles, bearings, switches, etc.)

Your modeling is going to prove invaluable with what you are up to, particularly if you apply it to the depth described. (e.g. all the way down to cutting plans for your sheet goods.)

Great start - keep us posted.
__________________

__________________
Alan
"If you must choose between two evils, pick the one you never tried before!"

Air #64439
Southeastern Camping Unit WBCCI #5033
TAC AL-8
2017 Canopenian
Alphonse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2013, 02:43 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
I use Autodesk Inventor which is a mechanical 3D modeling package but is it not made for interior design. I would love to have that ability. I want to eventually remodel my 31 ft trailer and also the kitchen in my house.

If you get a decent 3D model of the shell and floor I could use that. It is hard to model such a free form space as an Airstream trailer.

Perry
__________________

__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2013, 09:12 AM   #17
3 Rivet Member
 
albert's Avatar
 
1970 29' Ambassador
1959 22' Flying Cloud
1957 26' Overlander
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 233
Images: 17
Blog Entries: 1
Send a message via AIM to albert Send a message via Yahoo to albert
That looks great! I just had mine done but wasn't happy.
Question... Did he. It it right up to the trim seals or did he leave a gap and then fill it in with a pen?
My guy left up to a 1/2" gap all the way around saying that the seals are so dirt yet hat dirt will get in hyperextended and pull it up.
Thoughts?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr View Post
Robert from Heatwave Mobile Tinting in Lake Worth just finished up the Airstream, does it ever look cool! I went with ASWF Reflection 20, as it had the highest total solar energy rejection at 82%. Almost as mirror-bright as the trailer skin, already feels much cooler on the inside. Very reasonable price, as well. Here in S. Fla, there's loads of competition, so prices are low. It took him a while to get the two curved windows right, and was able to use the same film as the rest of the trailer. Glad it wasn't me doing it!
__________________
albert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2013, 07:39 AM   #18
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 384
Alphonse-
I was scratching my head about SketchUp until I read "The SketchUp Workflow for Architecture" by Brightman. He showed me how to set up my models so that they would move into Layout (included with SketchUp Pro) and be able to produce finished drawings that I could wave about proudly. He really spurred me into learning the software. I remapped all of the hotkeys so that SU was more similar to 3ds max, that helped a bunch as well.

perryg114-
Maybe you could go the same route that I did, with an Inventor-to-SketchUp connection. There's even a version of the V-Ray renderer that plugs into SU, if you want to go all-out. Even though it seems like overkill to completely delineate all of the parts of an assembly, it makes the actual work far more relaxing for me. I *know* everything will fit, and don't continuously re-figure all of my cuts, or add 5/16" when I should have subtracted it.

My shell turned out kinda crusty, but at the time I was too excited about the cabinetry. Yeah it's tough to get a good model of an Airstream! I'll be doing another round of renders in the next day or so, as I want to try out some different wood combinations, and maybe see what some 3Form Varia Ecoresin panels look like in the doors. I'll re-do my skin then, and use the simple way instead of the fancy way that doesn't work well!

albert-
There's maybe a 1/16" gap in my job that I plan to fill in with black caulking. Around these parts, if a tinter did a job like you describe, he would find his shop surrounded by a mob of angry villagers waving pitchforks and torches! I've got a lifetime guarantee on my tint, so the installer isn't too concerned about dirt creeping in. In your case, after he cut the first one, I would have had him re-do it, or run him off on the spot. I have no patience at all for shoddy craftsmen!
__________________
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2013, 08:05 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
No matter how well you model the skin there are no two Airstreams exactly the same. The structure does a lot of flexing and bending over time. Most folks end up having to pattern each bulkhead to get the contours right. Still it would be nice to have something close. On my 81 they used extrusions with slots in them to take up the flex. I have some loose interior rivets near the wheel wells from the PO not balancing the running gear but the damage is pretty much isolated to the rivets. These are mainly rivets that hold the extrusions to the walls. I have not seen any progression of the damage since I have had the trailer.

Sketch up is the Google free package?

Perry
__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 07:12 AM   #20
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 384
I'm not driving my crazy by modeling the skin to perfection- actual curves where the bulkheads meet the skin will be done with the cardboard-and-story-stick method. I find that good planning is key, but if I try to get things absolutely perfect in the plans, reality rears its ugly head and thwarts my best intentions!

You can get a free version of Trimble SketchUp (formerly owned by Google) that'll do most of the modeling stuff, and output dimensioned plans. You want to import/export models and create those spiffy drawings like the big boys use, that'll cost you $590.
__________________
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 07:30 AM   #21
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 384
Translucent Fiberglass Panels

I've been researching panels to use for my doors, head interior and light fixtures. The ones that I like are mind-blowingly expensive, and ship from far away. 3Form has their Varia Ecoresin line that winds up being somewhere in the neighborhood of $600-$800 for a 4X8 sheet I only need a half sheet for my doors, and something else for my lights. Found some tacky panels close by for less money, but was unmoved by their elegance.

So I'll try making my own! I plan to stretch out some visqueen on a piece of scrap plywood, then lay down some fiberglass cloth. I'll place a bunch of raffia (stringy plant fibers) in a pleasing pattern, and lay another of cloth over it. Soak the whole affair in marine epoxy, and I should have a sweet panel! Using a similar method, but putting Japanese rice paper in the sandwich should result in a great panel for overhead lights and a privacy screen for the head window.

I can dial in the stiffness/thickness/opacity/weight sweet spot by adding layers of fabric or other substrates to the mix.
__________________
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 12:52 PM   #22
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 384
New Renderings

I've added in the cellular blinds, the doors (with their fiberglass panels), changed the sink size, added the zolatone finish, added the overhead LED panels, cleaned up my trailer skin, and dummied in the roof hatches and a/c.

I'll have to try a version where I use more of the dark mahogany on the cabinets...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	031interiorFromTable.jpg
Views:	162
Size:	106.5 KB
ID:	202706   Click image for larger version

Name:	032interiorFromBath.jpg
Views:	159
Size:	96.7 KB
ID:	202707  

Click image for larger version

Name:	033viewOfRef.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	108.9 KB
ID:	202708  
__________________
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 08:57 PM   #23
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
I am blown away. Only thing that concerns me is the height of the upper most cabinet above the kitchen counter. Is it higher than 6 ft? Looks like a head banger if it is not that high.

Perry
__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 10:26 PM   #24
2 Rivet Member
 
Uppie89's Avatar
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Dublin , Ohio
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 27
Subscribed and following. I to am a cabinet maker now I'm operations manger at the company I work at. I do all estimating and project managing. So I know all about what your wanting to do. When I saw you mention 3 form I was wondering if you knew the cost! There are some other options out there but they are still a third the cost of 3 form.

I was wanting to do the rear bedroom to still kicking it around. But I would also have to re locate the hot water tank. I know a little auto cad but only 2d. But my two engineers are excellent at 3 d and rendering. We also have alpha cam and a Cnc. Witch I intend to use on my restoration.

I will be starting in the spring. I just wish my exterior already looked like yours!!!check out our website. Www.benchmarkwoodworks.com we have done some pretty cool projects. Looking forward to the adventure ahead of all us airstreamers this summer.
__________________
Uppie89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2014, 10:58 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
aquinob's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
Portsmouth , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 776
Neat plans. I'd like to see what the inside of the bath looks like in your sketchup shots.

Have you come up with a budget for the project and or a timeline? Do you think any of the existing appliances will make it into the new version? Have you looked into new axles, wheels and tires? Whats the general condition of the frame, windows and door?

I've had my trailer for a year now, and redid the rear bath and can tell you it takes way more time, effort and money than you initially estimate as I think most folks here will attest to. Good luck with the project, keep the photos coming.
__________________
Bob

Ongoing adventures at:
http://1973overlander.blogspot.com/
aquinob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2014, 07:29 AM   #26
4 Rivet Member
 
SuzyHomemakr's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
Boynton Beach , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 384
perryg114-
<blush> Thanks!
I know what you mean about the head-banging, as the cabinets are 64" above the floor. The cabinet above the stove has a motorized vent in it that I don't really want to move. I'm thinking about a version that has a 3" radiused edge, so when I bump my head, at least it won't draw blood!

Uppie89-
Sounds like you have all the fun toys! Very nice work your company does. Most of my tough cuts will be done on the scroll saw, CNC is but a misty desire. Though if you guys ever need a hand with a project, I do freelance modeling/rendering

I'll have to move the water heater... I'm thinking about externally mounting an Eccotemp L10 on-demand just behind the propane tanks. Lots of controversy about that in the forums.

You mentioned cheaper versions of the 3Form material; got a reference for that? Though I am quite stoked about doing my own experiments...

aquinob-
Ah, budgets and timelines... it costs what it costs, and takes as long as it takes. I feel certain that it'll cost less than a new one! I'll do things in stages so that the trailer still maintains basic functionality throughout the process. I enjoy the process so much, it doesn't really feel like work to me.

The refrigerator is great, rangetop gets replaced and oven goes. Suzy F. Homemaker don't be bakin' no cakes! The PO changed out the wheels and tires, and had the bearings done. From what I can see of the undercarriage, all looks good. Window trim needs refinishing on the inside, otherwise windows are good. My friend stopped by yesterday, and we tuned up the warped door I inherited that some miscreant had pried up at the bottom.

I'm in the process of replacing the porch light and the 3 rear marker lights with LED versions. Waiting on my caulking to arrive to finish it off. I still can't believe that the porch light switches on the negative leg. So I have to re-wire the fixture a bit, otherwise it stays on all the time. Two of the marker lights had never been wired in, so maybe that's why they wouldn't light up? So I'll pull new wire today, after finishing the polishing around where the old, crudded-up fixtures were.
__________________
SuzyHomemakr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2014, 08:08 AM   #27
2 Rivet Member
 
Uppie89's Avatar
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Dublin , Ohio
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 27
Below are a couple links to material I can think of off the top of my head.

Specialty Plexiglas

Home - Lumicor
__________________
Uppie89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2014, 05:18 PM   #28
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
A radius sounds like a good idea. I removed my vent motor and leaky crappy flap door. Mine was a major source of leaks mainly because there was an external flap door and no scoop over that to protect from rain and rain intrusion while towing. If yours has just the flap door consider an outside scoop to eliminate leaks. Sounds like you will have major $$$ tied up in this thing so you don't want water damage. By the way, plan on stuff getting wet and use water resistant materials.

Perry

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr View Post
perryg114-
<blush> Thanks!
I know what you mean about the head-banging, as the cabinets are 64" above the floor. The cabinet above the stove has a motorized vent in it that I don't really want to move. I'm thinking about a version that has a 3" radiused edge, so when I bump my head, at least it won't draw blood!
__________________

__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.