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Old 03-09-2014, 05:25 AM   #43
jcl
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New question: What is the availability of dump stations?
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Old 03-09-2014, 07:59 AM   #44
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You might want to consider solar power and that way you can live off the grid. Since your power is not very plentiful and as universally available here. When you get plug in power you can use that to charge your batteries. I don't know what you would do about AC. If you camp at high altitudes, you may not need AC. I know there are a lot of mountains in Chile.

Perry
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:06 AM   #45
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New question: What is the availability of dump stations?
While RV culture in here is pretty much zero, thereīs a huge tent culture. Thereīs a lot of national parks, from desert in the north to rainforest in the south and the pacific ocean all along in the west. Itīs pretty common to find dump stations on these places. Sometimes 220v/10-15A access. When camping in the wild, of course thereīs nothing. No power, no garbage disposal facility, no security. The wild !. In these cases itīs pretty common that you carry a lot of trash bags with you and carry them back until you find a place where to drop them.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:10 AM   #46
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You might want to consider solar power and that way you can live off the grid. Since your power is not very plentiful and as universally available here. When you get plug in power you can use that to charge your batteries. I don't know what you would do about AC. If you camp at high altitudes, you may not need AC. I know there are a lot of mountains in Chile.

Perry
I was considering a Honda 3Kw portable generator for those places where thereīs no power available. As I still ride dirt bikes, Iīm used to be carrying gas around in the track. Not sure if 3Kw will be enough though.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:18 AM   #47
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It seems to me you should plan to change the regulator and attachment points and find a way of securing the new tanks.

Jeff
Me too. Iīm glad the gas is the same !!!!. Also machining something to attach the local gas tanks itīs a great idea.

Yes customs in here can be really annoying. Iīm used to deal with them as Iīm importing cinema equipment all the time. Try to explain them whatīs a 18Kw HMI bulb took me a day or two.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:20 AM   #48
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I don't see why you can't make a simple pig tail that has the US male plug on one end and your female plug on the other end.

Perry
Thatīs a good idea. If I canīt change the sockets (I donīt see why wouldīt I) then US male plug > local female plug would do the trick.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:38 AM   #49
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3000 W should be enough if it can handle full load. The AC if you use it takes about 15A at 120V. The rest of the stuff it can handle just fine. Most folks use two Honda 2000W units ganged together to run the AC. The are pricey though.

Perry

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I was considering a Honda 3Kw portable generator for those places where thereīs no power available. As I still ride dirt bikes, Iīm used to be carrying gas around in the track. Not sure if 3Kw will be enough though.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:41 AM   #50
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From the shore power connection. 30 amp or 50 amp service.
Mmm thatīs not good. We have 10amp - 15 amp access here mostly. But my understanding is that a 240v TV will draw half as many amps as the same TV but in the 120v version. Something like 30A@120V = 15A@240V. So having access to our common 15amp 220v service might be enough.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:51 AM   #51
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If you convert the wiring so as to be able to plug the coach into local (Chile) power, any 220V appliances can be plugged into the AC electrical outlets in the coach, provided you change over the socket style to Chile sockets.

Here in North America RVs use LP gas, which is "Liquid Propane". 'bencina' sounds like Benzine, which is not the same thing.

See above for "plug outlets". It does occur to me though that any TVs in the coach will not, to my knowledge, work on 220V (with or without adapters), and so will also have to be changed out.

This will easily be sorted by a local Chilean electrician IMHO. You could contact one now to see what they think about this whole idea.


You mean the internal wiring or the external connectors for the service AC ?.
Doesnīt the breakers needs to be changed as well ?.

Iīm. As soon as I get an answer from Airstream to see what they are willing to do from the factory and what not, Iīll talk to my guy. When building our generators and power distribution system we have a lot of thinking and designing.

Haha, you misunderstood me. Bencina is the same as your US Gas. What most cars run with. I was asking Jeff if our "liquid gas" (what the BBQ uses and comes in tanks) was the same as your "liquid propane".

Yes, changing the TV for a 220v one is not such a big deal. Those are all VESA mounted and below 30" they are not as expensive as they use to be.
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Old 03-10-2014, 08:21 AM   #52
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In the USA there is a black wire (hot), white wire (neutral), and a ground wire. The neutral and ground are connected together but the green wire is used for safety to ground any metal enclosure so if a hot wire touches you won't get electrocuted. When you wire to 220V you need to make sure you don't get the hot and neutral reversed.
On the many item weīve imported from the US that offer universal power (110-240v) we just need to replace the plug. It doesīt matter where you put the hot and neutral as long as you leave the center pin for the ground. That makes me think changing the internal wiring of the Airstream might no be necessary.

Hereīs a pict of a male chilean plug.

ENCH MACHO CONVER 10A C/T NEGÂ*-Â*Sodimac.com

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I would get rid of all the US electronic toys and replace them with locally bought stuff. A new trailer will have more gadgets that will need to be replaced than an old trailer.
Thatīs my goal !. Just need to get 220v power on the sockets !.
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Old 03-10-2014, 08:28 AM   #53
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If it is a 12VDC TV set, then luckily, Chile uses the NTSC broadcast system, so it will work off-air.
Yes we are NTSC in here. Not sure where to find a 12v DC TV though…we have professional monitors that can be switched from AC 220v or DC 12v. But they are small and expensive for an RV...
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Old 03-10-2014, 08:54 AM   #54
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I think we've come full circle.

Using simple step-down transformers, we used our North American TVs, radios, VCRs, computers, printers, routers, kitchen appliances (including those with AC motors), fans, sewing machine and serger, small power tools, and so on, for three years in Chile. They all worked great. Dozens of other ex-pat families were doing the same where we were. Mains frequency never mattered. TV is the same standard in Chile.
Iīm a little bit confused here…are the wall outlets on the Airstream 12v or 120v standard ?. I assume 120v. Also I understand the AC is 120v, as well as the TV and bluray. Refrigerator 12v ?. Microwave ?.

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Aage, bencina is gasoline as the OP noted. Gas Licuado is bottled gas aka LPG.
Exactly.

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The shore power problem is not just a technical one for the Chilean electrician. The lack of heavier duty circuits in Chilean construction means that it will likely be difficult to find anything to plug into when camping.
Actually itīs pretty common to find 15amp@220v circuits in here. And (might be wrong) but shouldīt 15amp@220v = 30amp@120v ?.


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The design needs to start with what powers the trailer up to the shore power plug, then knowing the capability of that circuit the air conditioner question may be moot and the entire rest of the trailer could be run off one portable transformer purchased for a few hundred dollars. That was my original thought, anyway.
Exactly. And thatīs either 10amp@220v or 15amp@220v. Modern house have 20amp@220v on some circuits. 10A and 15A are pretty common.

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I looked up camping hookups in Chile and found a travel log by a North American who mentioned that he commonly found plug ins at Chilean campgrounds, but they were suitable only for lighting. He used a 1500 watt transformer to the camper, and noted that the only appliance that worked differently was the microwave (it didn't heat water as efficiently).
You mean those plugs would only be enough for the lights of the trailer and that he used a 1.500w transformer for that. So when using the microwave all lights must be turned off ?. Or that he used a 1.500w generator for the microwave ?.
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Old 03-10-2014, 09:05 AM   #55
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3000 W should be enough if it can handle full load. The AC if you use it takes about 15A at 120V. The rest of the stuff it can handle just fine. Most folks use two Honda 2000W units ganged together to run the AC. The are pricey though.

Perry
I believe 15@120v = 7.5@220v so that means 1.7kw for the AC. Probably 2Kw considering the peak draws. A 3Kw should be fine. Yes they are price, as everything thatīs not made in China these days !.

Also the AC would have to be rewired to the Honda generator (plus changing the AC to a 220v model)...
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Old 03-10-2014, 06:17 PM   #56
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Iīm a little bit confused here…are the wall outlets on the Airstream 12v or 120v standard ?. I assume 120v. Also I understand the AC is 120v, as well as the TV and bluray. Refrigerator 12v ?. Microwave ?.
Wall outlets are 120 v, but there aren't many of them. Some installed accessories are plugged into some of them, eg TV.

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Actually itīs pretty common to find 15amp@220v circuits in here. And (might be wrong) but shouldn't 15amp@220v = 30amp@120v ?.
You can find 15 amp 220 v circuits, but many were 10 amp in my experience. The issue is that you need to find a 15 amp circuit with nothing else on it, everywhere you camp. That is what the problem will be. You can modify your home wiring for a special plug, but you don't need that much power when you are parked at home, you are typically just charging batteries and using lights. You can wire a 220 v 15 amp special plug for your genset if that is going to be your only power source.

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You mean those plugs would only be enough for the lights of the trailer and that he used a 1.500w transformer for that. So when using the microwave all lights must be turned off ?. Or that he used a 1.500w generator for the microwave ?.
The plugs used by the traveller I read about, provided by the campsites, were only sufficient for lighting and microwave. They may have been shared circuits with other campers. He didn't have AC. He used a single 1500 w transformer and ran the entire camper off that. He noted that in his experience the microwave was less efficient at 50 hz than 60 hz, but that may also have been due to voltage drops in the circuit, not just the frequency. I don't know.

What I was saying about using a single transformer is that you could install one and then run the trailer on 120 since everything in there already works on 120. It is only one device to purchase. It may or may not run the AC, but you will find out soon enough. If you leave the 120 V circuits alone and add a few 220 volt outlets at strategic locations for your portable appliances, feeding them with a tee off the shore power connection, you could then use some local devices in the trailer that weren't dual voltage. Also, if you are going to be using a generator all the time anyway, you could use a 120 volt generator and just put a small stepup transformer in for the few 220 volt plug outlets you want. When you add up all the changes to the trailer it may get costly. Having a dual voltage trailer (and you just decide which devices to run on each voltage) would be simpler than the paradigm that says you take a 120 volt trailer and change everything to run on 220 v because that is what Chile uses. Especially when you are unlikely to find shore power connections everywhere you want to camp.

Jeff
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