Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-16-2016, 12:48 PM   #15
Displaced Beach Bum
 
beachbouy's Avatar
 
2016 30' International
Texas Airstream Harbor , Texas
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 151
Send a message via Skype™ to beachbouy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edistobob View Post
Have you taken a look at the app, "CoPilot USA"? I have used it for years and keep coming back to it as my "go to" app for getting around with our trailer and TV or just the TV. All of the maps reside on your phone so it will work just fine when there is no cell service, or you can keep the data turned off and simply make sure you conserve your data usage. I have found the detail showing stores, parking lots, etc. to be acceptable in almost all cases. Although I don't go off road often, I have also found that to be acceptable for my use. It does not have a "street view" mode. It allows many customizations (average speeds, preferences, routing options (RV/bike/car, etc) and quite a few others. Optionally you can add live traffic info and fuel price/location info (both require usage of data and a subscription). It may be worth your taking a look. I have tried quite a few other gps/mapping apps, but have always come back to this one as the overall most reliable one for my use even though it is not perfect (I don't think any are)--your mileage may vary!
There is no perfect GPS... One of the best features of CoPilot there are flavors for every device... Android, iPhone, iPad, Windows Phone, and Windows computers.

One important feature is that it also shows propane restricted tunnels.
__________________

__________________
We drag Mitzi a 2016 International Serenity 30 with Goodyear Endurance shoes, with an Equal-i-zer 1000 yanked around with a 2015 GMC Yukon XL SLT 4x4, 5.3L V8 ECOTEC3, 3.92 axle, 6-speed auto WBCCI #6111 AIR #107335

beachbouy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 01:47 PM   #16
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Currently Looking...
Center Moriches , New York
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 230
iPhones have been equipped with TRUE GPS receivers for years. My Samsung Galaxy S7Edge (and three-year-old Note 3) also had true GPS as standard equipment. You'd have to go back quite a few years (or maybe buy a really cheap smartphone) to find a smartphone without GPS. iPads that are WiFi ONLY (NO cellular capabilities) do NOT have GPS hardware built in. iPads WITH cellular capability DO have GPS hardware (even if you don't pay for cell service, the GPS still works).

RandyNH is correct. You can download Google Maps ahead of time so that the data is already on your phone. Data storage will be used; just something to keep in mind (that's why I always buy the greatest storage capacity available).

Keep in mind, GPS usage quickly uses up battery power. If you're in a vehicle and brought along the proper charging cord, no problem. If you're out hiking, it would be wise to have an external battery pack and the necessary cord so that you can top off the internal battery as needed.
__________________

__________________
NY24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 02:15 PM   #17
4 Rivet Member
 
greghoro's Avatar
 
2013 25' Flying Cloud
Wheaton , Illinois
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 347
GPS manufacturers cater to the masses. The masses don't drive back roads in Big Bend. There is no incentive for them to provide detailed maps for dirt roads which may be traversed very infrequently. Part of the problem is data obsolescence, needing to keep their data up to date. It's less risky for them not to show something that is there than to show something that has gone away or changed.

You have very demanding requirements, as has been noted by others. I'm guessing that if you ask your GPS to take you to the nearest Starbucks, there better be one there when you have reached the calculated destination. These things are not infallible and you need to recognize and accept that fact. Garmin updates their common GPS roadmap data four times a year. I can't speak to their specialty map data such as topographic, marine, etc nor other GPS brands. I've had more than a few instances where I asked the GPS to take me to a store or restaurant and it wasn't there when I arrived, although it used to be. I've been taken to the service entrance for a state park instead of the main entrance, as it was the closest point of egress to the park from my starting location.

I've taken a more proactive approach to navigation when it comes to finding a location I want to navigate to. My approach is to determine who is most motivated to have accurate data in my search context and rely on them to provide the information I need. This always requires some sort of access to the internet, so advanced planning is key. For instance, if I want to go to the closest Walmart, I go to the Walmart website and use their store locator. Or their iPhone App. If I want to find the route to a back country campsite in Big Bend, I go to the National Parks website and check out the maps for the park in question. Then I see if the GPS can accurately take me there. Note, most GPS manufacturers have a companion PC program that is a much better tool for planning than the GPS itself. Have you downloaded and tried using BaseCamp for your Garmin GPS?

I also use Google Earth to help verify navigation points, but it also suffers from data obsolescence. The satellite view of my neighborhood shows a house just under construction which has been completed and occupied more than 18 months ago. And the street level view of the same house shows the house that was there prior to the teardown.

Just trying to manage expectations.


Greg
__________________
greghoro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 02:36 PM   #18
Rivets?
 
nvestysly's Avatar

 
1992 29' Excella
2010 22' Interstate
Van By The River , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,522
Lots of good information here. I appreciate the fact that people who have responded are thinking outside the box so to speak rather than saying they love their TomTom or Garmin or Rand McNally, etc.

I'm currently downloading a trial version of the CoPilot app and will give it a try on my iPhone 4 in GPS only mode by turning off the cellular/data connection. I'll report back regarding my opinion on how well this approach works.
__________________
Lucius and Danielle
1992 29' Excella Classic
1996 GMC Suburban C2500 7.4L
2005 Chevrolet Suburban K2500 8.1L
Got a cooped-up feeling, gotta get out of town, got those Airstream campin' blues...
nvestysly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 02:58 PM   #19
Stay CazuaL
 
cazual6's Avatar
 
2014 19' Flying Cloud
Reseda , California
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 510
Images: 1
You are asking a lot for one device. You must understand each device has its strength and weakness.

For phones, you can download offline maps on a given area.

The only thing I can think off that would give you all what you want is a laptop based software. It doesn't require data and it has all the features you are looking for.

With the advent of mobile devices, those are going to be hard to come by. Good luck.
__________________
"No job is so simple that it cannot be done wrong."
"Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege."
"Either I will find a way, or I will make one."
"Sweat is your fat crying"
WBCCI 9164
cazual6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 03:33 PM   #20
.-. -...
 
Adventure.AS's Avatar

 
2017 25' International
Port Dover , Ontario
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by nilesrob View Post
If you end up going in the PC based map direction, just be aware there are (or were) almost no map programs built for a Mac. All of them were built for pc's, like Delorme just as an example. And you can buy very inexpensively (I don't know, maybe $50??) a gps device that attaches to your pc via a usb connection to provide you gps connection while using your pc-based map program.
Garmin has Mac based software - Basecamp. Also you could look at MacGPS Pro which can link directly to some GPS receivers and has great topographical maps available.
__________________
Ray B.
WBCCI #6497

“One test is worth a thousand 'expert' opinions”
Sign at Boeing headquarters, posted by test pilot Alvin “Tex” Johnston, c1948
Adventure.AS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2016, 06:43 PM   #21
Rivet Master
 
2015 25' Flying Cloud
2016 30' Flying Cloud
Blenheim Ontario , Ontario
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,264
I've learned not to trust GPS as an absolute.
Get a good road map and pre plan your trip; get a picture in your mind of your route.
Then when the GPS leads you astray, d it (and it will), you will know that the correct route is the one that your map told you is true.
Do not follow your GPS, it will follow you.
(Ask me how I know


"Look after your Equipment, it will look after you."
__________________
MelGoddard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2016, 06:12 AM   #22
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Currently Looking...
Center Moriches , New York
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 230
ALL GPS unit have some negatives. I would advise that you find out what the NEGATIVES of a GPS system / unit are. That way, you're less likely to get bitten in the behind. I too use Copilot BUT, the Copilot Truck HD App does NOT let you add anything re: propane. The Copilot RV App limits legnth to 45' and 26,000# GVWR (which rules out use in BIG RVs). Rand McNally ALWAYS tells me I have too much propane, even if I only travel on Interstate Highways. Apple Maps / Google Maps have no way to enter vehicle specifics (that I'm aware of). Get to a true truck stop and buy a hardcopy of the Rand McNally Motor Carrier's Atlas. It's an expensive book BUT, trucks stops discount it by over 50%. GREAT resource with tons of information that over the road truckers use every day. You'll be amazed at what you don't know (but should).

I think TomTom finally has an RV App but, I haven't seen it yet. As such, I have no idea what its' negatives are (although I think the TomTom car GPS is the best of that lot).
__________________
NY24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2016, 08:03 PM   #23
Rivets?
 
nvestysly's Avatar

 
1992 29' Excella
2010 22' Interstate
Van By The River , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,522
Update: Garmin RV 760LMT and CoPilot

Just came back from a 200+ mile round trip. Used the Garmin RV 760LMT on the way up and the CoPilot software on an iPhone4 on the return trip.

I had intended to use the CoPilot in GPS only mode. However, that's apparently not possible on an iPhone 4. iPhone 4 is limited in the version of iOS it will support - 7.x if I recall correctly. That version of iOS doesn't allow turning off all cellular connections (cell phone and cell data) while still leaving on the GPS. Airplane mode in this version of iPhone turns off GPS too.

My wife has an iPhone 6 that utilizes a later version of iOS and its airplane mode leaves GPS on.

Back to comparing Garmin RV 760LMT and CoPilot...

Both have inconsistencies in how they depict lane choices.

The Garmin does a better job indicating turn left at traffic light. Go straight at intersection. CoPilot was okay but Garmin was better.

The Garmin leaves quite a bit to be desired when describing road numbers - i.e. follow route xx for so many miles. I was driving on a section of U.S. highway that was a combined road - U.S. 23 and U.S. 441. The Garmin seems to have "inflection" points where it thinks the road number has changed and it really hasn't. Consequently it would indicate visually and audibly to make a right or left when there really was no turn involved.

There is lots more to report on and I'll do that tomorrow after I speak to customer service.

For now I'm leaning toward CoPilot. At this point it comes down to if I'm going to be dissatisfied do I want to be $300 unhappy or just $20 unhappy?
__________________
Lucius and Danielle
1992 29' Excella Classic
1996 GMC Suburban C2500 7.4L
2005 Chevrolet Suburban K2500 8.1L
Got a cooped-up feeling, gotta get out of town, got those Airstream campin' blues...
nvestysly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2016, 09:39 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,832
I find navigating with Delorme on a PC with the antenna aggravating.
There is nowhere to place the PC to be easily visible.
That was my first attempt at navigation back in 2004.
In 2006, I used a Magellan stand alone GPS device. It had its quirks and limits, but was a little better than the Delorme on a PC.
The Magellan device quit in 2008 and I bought a Garmin Nuvi GPS device which I still have, but never use. It is outdated and the updates are expensive. You could almost buy a new device with lifetime updates for what the updates cost.
Then, in 2010, I got an Alpine double din navigation head unit. It is outdated and slow.
The maps and navigation that come pre-loaded on my iPhone have been better but still sometimes outdated and wants to take you on some crazy out of the way route.
I have used the Alpine, iPhone, Garmin, and an Android phone. The 4 devices gave 4 different routes and they were all wrong.
Back to the Rand McNally Road Atlas and memorizing routes...
Even when using Google or MapQuest you get several routes. You don't really learn the best route until you have made the same trip several times.
We first began traveling to a rally in Texas in October every year in 2011. I finally figured out the best route on my own without the assistance of any device in 2015.
You see, these devices are not humans. They don't have brains. They can't reason and cipher. They don't take into consideration stop lights, stop signs, traffice, pee stops, lunch breaks, fuel stops...
I think they are calculating shortest time or shortest distance in time or miles. There are soooo many more variables...
I can get from home to almost anywhere with a map and a compass. When I get into a specific city and I am looking for a particular destination within that city I will look it up on a GPS device.
Sometimes I will buy the gazetteer map of a city to help me get around or know where attractions are.
From road map and compass to several electronic gadgets back to road map and compass...
The free official state road maps at the rest areas are the best maps- better than the road atlas as far as detail-
When a GPS tells me to go some crazy route, but I override it and go the way I have been going over 40 years, the lady gets bossy...
Recalculating...
Make a u-turn...
Recalculating...
Make a u-turn...
Eventually, she figures out what I am doing and changes the route to match what I am doing.
Frustrating really-
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 03:45 PM   #25
Rivets?
 
nvestysly's Avatar

 
1992 29' Excella
2010 22' Interstate
Van By The River , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,522
long post but it will help me get my thoughts together and might help others at some point...

Thanks m.hony for the reply. While I haven't owned a GPS unit until now I've been in several vehicles where the users follow them blindly. Many times missing interesting routes because the GPS simply told them to go from A to B and the person didn't give the route any thought. "Recalculating" is very annoying.

When using our smart phone for maps we very seldom take the entire route it suggests. We choose one of the 2 or 3 routes the smart phone shows on the map and then make our own way as we see fit. We combine the smart phone map with paper maps. The paper maps very seldom let us down. The smart phone has lots to add to the equation so it's indispensable.

In the last day or so my GPS evaluation has been slowed by chores around the house. I've spent a little time on the GPS matter and I see it taking shape a little differently than I had planned. Keep in mind I naively purchased a GPS (the Garmin RV 760LMT) thinking it would show all the same roads the smart phone depicted. I didn't necessarily expect the GPS to be the same as the smart phone - I realize the smart phone streams data and therefore can show more and various kinds of data versus the GPS - but I did expect the GPS to be much better than it is.

Here are my latest thoughts regarding which approach to take. A decision has not been made but I hope to solidify one of these approaches in the next week or so.

A - Keep the Garmin RV 760LMT and figure out how to make it work in our traveling world. The approximate $300 purchase price included the "bean bag" friction/weighted base and I do find that feature handy. I've managed to turn off "recalculating" so that's good.

B - Buy 2015 DeLorme Street Atlas Plus for a tablet PC ~$40. DeLorme worked with me over the phone and their software has the several locations that I have in mind for our next trip. So I'm reasonably confident the software will work. Buy a tablet PC ~$150. The DeLorme software permits using a larger screen (the tablet PC or regular laptop) for trip planning and the tablet PC would then be the equivalent of a GPS with the addition of a GPS dongle at ~$30. I'd also have to find a way to charge the tablet PC while in the car. Our vehicle is old enough that it doesn't have an AC power outlet. So another $50-75 for an inverter or some other charger. Some downsides are no traffic information and the DeLorme software may become obsolete at some point because they don't plan to introduce a 2016 product. This option also gets me to ~$300 on the expense side.

C - Use CoPilot or some similar smart phone software in GPS mode when needed, otherwise use data mode and have access to traffic info, etc. Initial cost is probably under $50 but I have not identified a way to perform trip planning on a larger screen. CoPilot has several nice features but the lack of interface to a laptop is a bummer.

D - stick with trip planning on the PC, paper maps, no interface from PC to smart phone. $0 initial outlay but not very convenient for many reasons. I'm not saying this method is not useful but I'd like to "upgrade" as this method exclusively leaves a little to be desired.

Related to item A - I finally realized what BaseCamp is used for. Several people referred to it on other threads and perhaps even on this thread but I didn't understand what it did and why it might be helpful. It was only after speaking to Garmin quasi-customer service for quite a long time that the idea of using BaseCamp came up. BaseCamp is free software that is downloaded to a PC or MAC. This software allows trip planning on a large format screen and then the information can be downloaded to the GPS. It has a few annoyances in my mind. First, the GPS unit must be connected to the computer to really do much of anything. Without connecting the GPS the map displayed on BaseCamp is very minimal. Second, (related to first) is the map it uses is only the map that's contained in the GPS. I was under the impression BaseCamp would have more details than the GPS. Not so - you have to buy upgraded maps if you want more detail.
__________________
Lucius and Danielle
1992 29' Excella Classic
1996 GMC Suburban C2500 7.4L
2005 Chevrolet Suburban K2500 8.1L
Got a cooped-up feeling, gotta get out of town, got those Airstream campin' blues...
nvestysly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 03:54 PM   #26
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,832
I downloaded the Copilot app.
Didn't like it.
Deleted it.
It tried to take me some screwy route just like all other GPS devices.
Even with 2 options, neither was correct.
My instincts on how to go based on living here 47 years are better than any GPS.
GPS only helps in unfamiliar territory.
Then, if It takes you the wrong way you don't really know because you don't know the right way.
But I am positive that if it takes me the wrong way in familiar territory it is also taking me the wrong way in unfamiliar territory...
I still say get the free official state road maps at the rest areas, a Rand McNally road atlas, and a compass...
Nothing new under the sun-
Not a better mousetrap...
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 03:56 PM   #27
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,832
Using a road atlas and a yellow highlighter at home before you leave is best.
Then memorize a few steps at a time.
Memorize the route up until your first pee break, fuel stop, or lunch break.
Then memorize a little more until the next break.
If there are 2 or more routes, try them all and decide which is best.
Go one way.
Come home another.
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2016, 04:26 PM   #28
.-. -...
 
Adventure.AS's Avatar

 
2017 25' International
Port Dover , Ontario
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvestysly View Post
A - Keep the Garmin RV 760LMT and figure out how to make it work in our traveling world. The approximate $300 purchase price included the "bean bag" friction/weighted base and I do find that feature handy. I've managed to turn off "recalculating" so that's good.
Contrary to a Ludite point of view, expressed by some, I have found a GPS extremely valuable for flying, sailing and for driving. You will find that your Garmin is well worth the price when travelling through an unfamiliar, large metropolitan area on an expressway. The PhotoReal Junction feature will display an upcoming junction for you and allow you to move to the appropriate lane in plenty of time. This is especially useful when having to exit left or when the right hand lane ends at an upcoming exit.

I would love to have your GPS as it will allow you to see live weather on your route (if you link it with your smart phone.) For now, I just use an iPhone app called "Storm" to view weather ahead. This is great for seeing severe storm cells and being able to divert or stop if needed. I have used this ability of smart phone technology for many, many years.

Speaking of smart phone apps, you might want to look at Waze. This is a 'crowd sourced' app that will give you notification of hazards ahead of you and congested traffic. This feature helped me avoid a huge accident when travelling through the Birmingham area in April.
__________________

__________________
Ray B.
WBCCI #6497

“One test is worth a thousand 'expert' opinions”
Sign at Boeing headquarters, posted by test pilot Alvin “Tex” Johnston, c1948
Adventure.AS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which would you rather? Better brakes, better hitch, or better wheels/tires? bjmckernan General Repair Forum 30 07-17-2016 07:47 AM
Rand McNally GPS Rand McNally TripMaker RVND 7710 7-Inch GPS adonh Computers, Internet & Satellite 5 03-26-2013 10:39 AM
better search tool? Boondocker Forum Admin, News and Member Account Info 11 06-17-2007 07:39 PM
GPS - dumb*** questions Foiled Again Off Topic Forum 8 06-05-2006 07:17 PM
To GPS or not to GPS? autoist Airstream Motorhome Forums 8 02-27-2003 10:03 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.