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Old 04-05-2011, 11:38 AM   #1
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1964 26' Overlander
dingwall , Nova Scotia
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What do you do with the wheels?

Sorry. I'm sure this question has been asked and answered but I can't seem to find the thread (the story of my life).
Though I don't live full-time in my Airstream, IT lives full-time in the same spot... on the north-east coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, where the weather can be crazy. (I was told they had 21 ft snowbanks out there this past winter!)
Anyway, my 64 Overlander sits on a level spot but it gets pretty damp in spring, and whenever there is a major rainfall.
What's the best way for me to jack it up? Should the wheels be kept right off the ground? Should they be sitting on pads of some kind? Right now, the situation is pretty makeshift...
I should say that I don't plan on moving my little sweetie anywhere. She goes with the land she's on, where I have septic and spring water and electricity. So, any suggestions? And any general tips on helping her cope with the elements?
Thanks, everybody.
Looking forward to the summer!
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:04 PM   #2
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Hi surfscoter. Yes, I very much appreciated the picture of your campsite. Had to use it for my desktop wallpaper until I had a chance to show my wife. Gorgeous!

The screw-down stabilizer jacks are for stabilizing only -- you don't want them compensating for eventual tire air loss thru the cold seasons when you're snug at home. I'd probably pick up 2? 4? stack jacks and set them under the longitudinal C-channel that the axles are connected to. You don't necessarily need a concrete pad but I might think of a 2x8 less than the tire track width would be a good foundation under stack jacks. Rely on your tongue jack to do it's thing. And then lower stabilizer jacks firmly but not enough to lift any load.

You'll probably need to get a sense of how this settles during wet, dry or cold times. Keep 'er level and don't let the stabilizer jacks carry a lot of dead weight.

More pictures are always appreciated.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:09 PM   #3
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BTW - post 6 of the thread I cited above shows your Overlander with greenery growing up around the belly. Just sayin' ... but that situation is suspected to keep humidity higher between the belly pan and floor, with possible problems of aggravating frame rust or floor rot. (though floor rot more likely first needs a primary leak of the shell above)

Maybe this is something to plan for in creating more of a pad some day. Don't think I'd necessarily feel I had to go with concrete though.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:20 PM   #4
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If you are serious about not moving your TT but are really concerned about prolonging its life while keeping it in the best shape possible, you might be wise to consider a more permanent setting for it.

By that I mean perhaps the concrete pad Bob mentioned in the previous posts, pehaps weeping tile around the trailer to take rain water away quickly, and a more permanent bed for it sit on than the wheels and stabilizer jacks; even beyond the stack jacks (concrete black, for example).

Hard skirting of some type might be a way to limit or exclude animal and insect ingress.

A winter-only frame to support a canvas or plastic shell over the winter will keep it more dry and slow down rot. That would also require thought about air exchange, though. You don't want mold growing in it.

The sky's the limit!
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:10 PM   #5
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1964 26' Overlander
dingwall , Nova Scotia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanoeStream View Post
BTW - post 6 of the thread I cited above shows your Overlander with greenery growing up around the belly. Just sayin' ... but that situation is suspected to keep humidity higher between the belly pan and floor, with possible problems of aggravating frame rust or floor rot. (though floor rot more likely first needs a primary leak of the shell above)

Maybe this is something to plan for in creating more of a pad some day. Don't think I'd necessarily feel I had to go with concrete though.
Yes, I realise that is not a great situation. I try to keep it trimmed down when I'm there, and have a local lad to do it (or that's the deal), when I'm not. I was also thinking that all that greenery provides some great jumping off sites for mice which were definitely visiting when it was parked by the previous owners in the woods. Must stay on top of it!

A concrete pad sure doesn't appeal to me either!

Thanks loads. Glad you liked the photo!
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:15 PM   #6
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1964 26' Overlander
dingwall , Nova Scotia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aage View Post
If you are serious about not moving your TT but are really concerned about prolonging its life while keeping it in the best shape possible, you might be wise to consider a more permanent setting for it.

By that I mean perhaps the concrete pad Bob mentioned in the previous posts, pehaps weeping tile around the trailer to take rain water away quickly, and a more permanent bed for it sit on than the wheels and stabilizer jacks; even beyond the stack jacks (concrete black, for example).

Hard skirting of some type might be a way to limit or exclude animal and insect ingress.

A winter-only frame to support a canvas or plastic shell over the winter will keep it more dry and slow down rot. That would also require thought about air exchange, though. You don't want mold growing in it.

The sky's the limit!
All great suggestions. Thanks, Aage!

Perhaps someone could point the way to a thread that deals with where to place jacks?
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:17 PM   #7
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1964 26' Overlander
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Apologies, Canoestream. You told me where to put the jacks. Duh...
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