Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-17-2009, 12:36 AM   #15
3 Rivet Member
 
1983 31' Airstream310
Santa Cruz , California
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 157
Images: 12
Comments posted so far are all good -- except the bit about shouting about cleaning shotguns -- and I'm sure too that you'll have little problem. A couple of things to add...

The most intimidating practical personal defense item I can recommend is a seriously bright police-type flashlight, specifically a Mag Lite "Mag Charger." This is about $100 and can be recharged from 120 volts or 12 volts. It is much brighter than anything that operates from normal D cells.

I was the munchkin in tow when my mother made the same decision you did, only we were tent camping. Three times across the country and all over in between (and we ended up on the opposite coast). It was a different time (40 years ago, I was 7 to 10 years old) but some things haven't changed. It was far less common for single women to be out alone doing such a thing, and many friends worried about her safety (and sanity). She said that she found one of the most significant protective things to do, from getting good service at garages to cooperation from campground hosts for late arrivals, was the fact that she was driving a shiny new car (in this case, a 1963 Dodge Dart convertible). She felt that the miscreants we occasionally ran across were put off by the neat appearance of our "rig." I've seen that in my travels too; ragtag people who look like they need help are victimized where people who seem together and self-sufficient are left alone.
__________________

__________________
dljosephson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 04:56 AM   #16
3 Rivet Member
 
Whirlaway's Avatar
 
2008 27' Classic FB
Anytown , Massachusetts
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by dljosephson View Post
Comments posted so far are all good -- except the bit about shouting about cleaning shotguns -- and I'm sure too that you'll have little problem. A couple of things to add...

The most intimidating practical personal defense item I can recommend is a seriously bright police-type flashlight, specifically a Mag Lite "Mag Charger." This is about $100 and can be recharged from 120 volts or 12 volts. It is much brighter than anything that operates from normal D cells.

I was the munchkin in tow when my mother made the same decision you did, only we were tent camping. Three times across the country and all over in between (and we ended up on the opposite coast). It was a different time (40 years ago, I was 7 to 10 years old) but some things haven't changed. It was far less common for single women to be out alone doing such a thing, and many friends worried about her safety (and sanity). She said that she found one of the most significant protective things to do, from getting good service at garages to cooperation from campground hosts for late arrivals, was the fact that she was driving a shiny new car (in this case, a 1963 Dodge Dart convertible). She felt that the miscreants we occasionally ran across were put off by the neat appearance of our "rig." I've seen that in my travels too; ragtag people who look like they need help are victimized where people who seem together and self-sufficient are left alone.

It's all about command presence...In the first few seconds people size you up as a victim or not a victim.

Consider the Streamlight new LED flashlight. I have carried both and I have preferred the Streamlight, it holds it's charge when out in the cold temps for over an hour were the Maglite seems to die very quickly. LED gives you longer run time with the option of the regular bulb for task lighting.
__________________

__________________
Life Is Not A Dress Rehersal
It's okay to have too much fun
WBCCI #8701* TAC MA-1 * NEU UNIT
Gracie...A Liver & White GSP
Get busy livin', or get busy dyin'." - The Shawshank Redemption
Whirlaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 06:15 AM   #17
4 Rivet Member
 
3streams's Avatar
 
1948 22' Liner
1961 26' Overlander
1949 24' Limited
Springs , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 330
I have traveled alone- particularly while recovering trailers. Ditto on the flashlight, bear spray, and emergency numbers in your phone. I wouldn't go nuts with too much stuff (but if your staying for awhile- two chairs is worth it). The best thing is to not come across as all skitish and spooked- don't let yourself be tagged as the victim. One thing is for sure- you will never regret getting your airstream!
__________________
April & Andy Hershberger
www.ClassicAluminumTrailers.com
3streams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 07:13 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
danalee's Avatar
 
1978 29' Ambassador
Walnut Cove , North Carolina
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 519
Images: 30
These are all great suggestions and even those of us who have a travel companion can keep them in mind. I will do most of the driving and some assumptions might be made. My favorite is the mudy boots.
It is one reason I always own a big dog, I know they are really ***** cats but most people up to know good will avoid someone with a 4 legged companion.
__________________
Dannie
The Silver Queen
danalee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2009, 07:53 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
87MH's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Texas Airstream Harbor , Zavalla, in the Deep East Texas Piney Woods on Lake Sam Rayburn
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,435
Images: 292
Biggest Safety/Security Concerns

I'm surprised no one has yet mentioned perhaps the three most probable safety and security issues -
  • Common Sense - don't drive when you are tired, do not exceed your personal limitations, do not drive in bad weather or when ice may be encountered on the road.
  • Maintain a properly sized Tow Vehicle (TV) for your trailer and purchase the best Weight Distribution (WD) Hitch you can afford.
  • Have a contingency plan for your travel plans and equipment and know what to do when it breaks down or you are involved in an accident.
On common sense:

- I'll leave that one alone - A good GPS with trip planner and a good cell phone with nationwide coverage will go a long way to helping you with go/no go decisions.

On a Tow Vehicle:

Purchase a properly sized vehicle (Factory Tow rated for at least 120% of the weight of your trailer) AND capable of being loaded with everything" (including the tongue weight) without busting the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).

The best reference that I know of to assist in choosing your TV is the "Trailer Life" series of Tow Guides (by year). Below is a link to their 2008 Guide - it's a huge PDF file (19 megs), so it will take a while to load, but please take the time to read and understand it.

http://www.trailerlife.com/images/di...wGuide0801.pdf

I have quoted what I believe to be the most important paragraph in that guide below.

"The GVWR figures are neither guidelines nor estimates; they are limits, and there are numerous valid reasons the manufacturer arrived at the figures given. If you think these figures are “close enough” or have a fudge-factor percentage built in, think again. Your warranty coverage — and your safety — may be at risk."

There is a lot to learn about towing and vehicles here in the Forums - use the advanced search function to find specifics.

On Contingency Plans:

NEVER succumb to "get there itis" - if it takes an extra day - or two or three - that's OK - take your time and travel safe. Slow down, enjoy the scenery, or the attractions of where you are.

Be sure you have a GOOD break down and towing plan. I can attest to the benefits of the "Good Sam" tow plan. I am sure there are others that rank in the same league as "Good Sam", but I am familiar with their services.

When broken down on the side of the road you really do not have the luxury of finding the "best" local towing company that is capable of handling your TV and trailer. Good Sams has a central US dispatcher, they have pre-approved towing servises all over the country, and, best of all, they will call them and pay them directly - no out of pocket expense to you.

I used them when the 345 MoHo' transmission went south several years ago. The wait for a rig was a bit longer than usual because the "closest" recommended rig was out of commission. But I was saved unknown hours because Good Sams knew WHO to call, and had backups to the priimary service providers.

Again, good praises for Good Sam's, they asked all of the appropriate questions, - they were looking for health/safety issues first - made sure that we were "OK" (able to handle the situation mentally), and fished out that we knew that no work could be done until Monday - they even offered to tow us to a campsite and retow on Monday morning.

All the people we talked to with Good Sam's were based in the Boston area. They had all the resources in the area listed on their computer, I could not imagine me calling through a yellow pages list late on Saturday trying to find a tow truck that was outfitted properly to tow the MoHo.

Good Sam continued to call after to make sure that we were not only safe but were handling the stress of the situation. I used them a second time when I had a flat time on the TV which I could not handle myself. The same good service ensued, even though it was four o'clock in the morning.

Like I said, I am sure there are other RV specific (that's an important item - dont expect a "run of the mill" towing policy to handle an RV situation) towing services, but I have had nothing but good service from Good Sam.

RV'ing is supposed to be enjoyable - take your time, take it slow, ask questions, "try" various TV's and trailers to see if they "fit". I once purchased a new Chebby half ton - sold it with about 600 miles on it - it simply did not "fit" - never could get comfortable driving it.

For sure, go to as many Forums and WBCCI rallys as you can and ask as many questions as possible from as many people as possible. For starters, the knowledge base here in these Forum pages is your most valuable source of information.

Luck.
__________________
Dennis

"Suck it up, spend the bucks, do it right the first time."

WBCCI # 1113
AirForums #1737

Trailer '78 31' Sovereign

Living Large at an Airstream Park on the Largest Lake Totally Contained in Texas
Texas Airstream Harbor, Inc.
87MH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2009, 08:12 AM   #20
1 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
weehawken , New Jersey
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9
Thanks everyone for your thoughts!

I was thinking about it over the weekend and it struck me that I have no problem traveling alone in a car or on a plane or in hotels etc and I have been on the streets of NYC and on subways in the wee hours of the morning (NYC of course being a much safer place now than ever) without problems-- so why am I nervous about traveling alone with an airstream? I think it may just be out of my comfort zone since I haven't done it before--not sure what to expect etc.
__________________
jolttx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2009, 10:41 AM   #21
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Jenni, I see from your profile you live in or near Weehawken. When you get a chance, maybe you can drive over to Colonial Airstream, they are just down the road from you ("just down the road" being relative). If you go, ask for Patrick, he is NeatAirstream here on the forums. I'm sure he'll be happy to show you their inventory. He may even have a few suggestions about your cat dilemma.

I also have a 6 cell MagLite I use for 1-seeing at night, and 2-as a billy club. I've used it, or one like it, for both purposes. I haven't had to use it for purpose #2 while camping.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2009, 10:18 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
Sugarfoot's Avatar
 
1960 24' Tradewind
1956 30' Sovereign of the Road
1963 16' Bambi
Southeastern Area , Tennessee
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,115
You Go, Girl!

Hi Jolttx and welcome to the wonderful life of Airstreaming. Everything thing said on this thread is true and good advice. Confidence and commone sense really is key.

The first time you go out in your Airstream go close to home. Get comfortable with the process of handling a trailer. Venture out further as you become more comfortable with hitching, backing, camp setup and breakdown. The confidence you show in managing your Airstream will add to the "I am not a victim" image you need to portray. Camping with other Airstreamers can also do wonders for your confidence. Take in a rally or two before you hit the road on your own.

Whirlaway is so right about "listening to the voices". That inner voice is right more often than not. Listen to it and do what you must.
__________________
Traveling With Elvis
life with a 1956 Sovereign of the Road

Aluminocentricity
Sugarfoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2009, 05:54 PM   #23
1972 Travelux Princess 25
 
Cobourg , Ontario
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,042
Thrift stores are good places to buy well worn boots, hard hats, or jackets cheap. If you want to be seen wearing your "husband's" football team jacket thrown over your shoulders when doing chores.
__________________
Living in the trailer park of sense, looking out the window at a tornado of stupidity.
Ganaraska is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2009, 06:46 PM   #24
Rivet Master
 
wheel interested's Avatar
 
2007 23' International CCD
Lapeer , Michigan
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 7,039
I feel very secure in the Airstream. I have traveled alone cross country and stayed on the road at rest stops and travel centers and if it doesn't feel right I just move on. Surprising how much more awake you feel after a brush with imagination or woman's intuition.

I actually don't think this is a gender or single predictament. We all need to be aware and be cautious as we negotiate our way. Crime and violence unfortunatelty strikes at random but we can be cognizant of our surroundings and move with determination and purpose and concentrate on making ourselves less of an easy perceived mark.

I like to not be one of two anywhere. I look to surround myself with a cross section of others and count on good samaritans and witnesses to stave off crimes of opportunity and I do not stop at isolated areas. I think urban areas are a bigger threat than rural areas and that may or may not have reality as a basis. However living in urban areas all my life I think crime is much higher there with the population and intercity challenges that exist therein.

It actually is an interesting topic that I have often wondered about even before setting out to travel on my own often times. If I am the dissimilar occupant or traveler am I the obvious choice of election of crime? Are the risks higher when you remove yourself from your usual environment?

I think of risks mainly in terms of unforseeable occurances, wrong place wrong time, and do my best to not look like an easy target. A barking dog is reassuring to me as an indicator of unseen visitors and the announcement of their approach.

I don't travel with a weapon but others don't know that. Heck, I squirt myself in the eye with hair spray! Keeping distance is my number one defense and actually my plan of escape. We have only been a cat owner for a couple of years but travel has been going OK. A collar and lead even inside the trailer has come in handy. We have chased over creation otherwise. I have let him roam free when we are not leaving soon after.

Campgrounds themselves are much safer than hotels or motels, I think.
__________________
Caroljb



photography
wheel interested is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2009, 08:27 PM   #25
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Cincinnati , Ohio
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 131
I would consider a self-defense class. There are classes available for women only.

I'm a big guy, in construction, and rather scary looking. (Size 12 foot) I've had many women (alone) come right up to me to ask about my Airstream when I'm walking to the laundry or such. I believe the campground is probably one of the safest places you could ever be.

Woody
__________________

__________________
Woody.303 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
safety, single, fulltiming


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home RV pad with hookups considerations? aomastu Full-Timing, Winter Living & Workamping 21 01-11-2017 04:03 PM
Considerations when buying an Airstream mello mike Buyer Guidelines 42 09-05-2007 12:49 PM
Women with Power Tools!! jordandvm General Interior Topics 1 11-07-2005 11:18 PM
women buying A/S... alt Our Community 33 09-12-2004 08:28 AM
Route Considerations - International in Vermont overlander64 On The Road... 6 06-22-2003 08:15 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.