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Old 08-23-2011, 12:50 PM   #1
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What is this I found in my Airstream?

Another fun, but helpful thread!
If you find something in your Airstream and are unsure what it is or what it does post it here and get it ID'd!
I think we have a "What does this switch do" thread, so I am thinking this one is for other stuff.

Ok, let me start..
Found this odd looking pipe with odd looking fittings in one of the storage drawers... its about 5' long.
My best guess is something to do with the Propane tank?



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Old 08-23-2011, 02:44 PM   #2
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Another fun, but helpful thread!
If you find something in your Airstream and are unsure what it is or what it does post it here and get it ID'd!
I think we have a "What does this switch do" thread, so I am thinking this one is for other stuff.

Ok, let me start..
Found this odd looking pipe with odd looking fittings in one of the storage drawers... its about 5' long.
My best guess is something to do with the Propane tank?
That's a male to male fitting that would connect 2 LPG tanks together, so that you could transfer LPG from one tank, to the other.

The full tank must be upside down and higher than the empty tank. The bleed valve on the empty tank would have to be opened to allow the transfer.

Andy
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Old 08-23-2011, 03:32 PM   #3
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Would opening a bleed valve depend on type of tank, old ones would transfer by gravity without a bleed valve? Did they(vertical type) even have one?
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Old 08-23-2011, 03:36 PM   #4
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Would opening a bleed valve depend on type of tank, old ones would transfer by gravity without a bleed valve? Did they(vertical type) even have one?
You must be able to open a blled valve on the empty tank.

If not, then as soon as the pressure equalizes, the flow will stop.

Doesn't make sense, but that's the way it works for me when I transfer the LPG.

It does help some what, if you let the full tank get warm from the sun, and keep the empty tank cool.

Andy
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Old 08-23-2011, 04:44 PM   #5
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I transfer gas that way frequently to fill smaller tanks.
The tank being filled needs the 20% valve which is a screw or possibly a knurled nut on the side of the valve slightly open. Of course the regular handle must be opened also.
When you start getting liquid instead of gas out of the bleeder the tank is properly filled.
The "source" tank must be upside down. This is one of those "don't do this at home "things and should be done in a well ventilated outside area.
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Old 08-23-2011, 04:53 PM   #6
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I transfer gas that way frequently to fill smaller tanks.
The tank being filled needs the 20% valve which is a screw or possibly a knurled nut on the side of the valve slightly open. Of course the regular handle must be opened also.
When you start getting liquid instead of gas out of the bleeder the tank is properly filled.
The "source" tank must be upside down. This is one of those "don't do this at home "things and should be done in a well ventilated outside area.
Also a "don't do this at home" disclaimer....but I found myself with almost 80# of propane in 4, 20# tanks when the OPD law came into effect. I've been using a transfer device to refill the 1# bottles for my portable grill for several years now. Warm 20# bottle, upside down and the 1#er in the fridge for about 30 minutes. This method gets the 1# bottle almost full. If you put them in the freezer, or fridge too long, you can overfill the 1# bottle and when removed from the 20# tank, it will bleed off some gas.

Again don't do this at home and do it outside in a safe area!
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:36 PM   #7
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This may be quite elementary for some, but it may help others.

Propane is a popular fuel because, while it must be in its’ gaseous form to be used as a fuel, it can be stored as a liquid at atmospheric temperatures, under relatively low pressure.
In a resting tank (one tuned off or with no gas flowing) the liquid boils to form gas until the pressure inside the tank rises to the point that no more room exists for more gas at a given temperature. As the temperature rises, more liquid boils until equilibrium is again reached. Under normal ambient temps here on earth, all things are safe and happy. A tank exposed to fire is a problem, but that is another story.

As propane gas is allowed to escape, into the regulator and pipes on its’ way to an appliance, the liquid propane again boils to equalize at somewhere around 80-150 psi.

The beauty of this fuel is that is 1 gallon of liquid makes 270 gallons of vapor. Depending on ambient temperature a 30 lb. tank holds 4-5 liquid gallons, or up to 1350 gallons of usable gaseous fuel.

When one transfers propane with a device like above, the liquid is the goal. But as the liquid moves into the empty tank, it boils off trying to fill the space. So, allowing a little vapor to escape via the mentioned vapor valve, allows more liquid in. Turning the full tank upside down makes certain only liquid is flowing out.

Two half full tanks is the best outcome to be expected. A pretty fire ball or maybe a quick trip around the yard on the top of a propane tank are the other possibilities.

The 20% space that should be left at the top of a full tank is the vapor space, to allow all this to work. At a propane fill facility, a pump is used to overcome the pressure inside the tank, and forces liquid in. The overfill-protection-device (OPD) was developed as a safety to prevent the pump forcing liquid into the vapor space. It is simply a float that shuts to seal and stop the flow when liquid reaches the 80% full level.
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:53 PM   #8
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This may be quite elementary for some, but it may help others.

Propane is a popular fuel because, while it must be in its’ gaseous form to be used as a fuel, it can be stored as a liquid at atmospheric temperatures, under relatively low pressure.
In a resting tank (one tuned off or with no gas flowing) the liquid boils to form gas until the pressure inside the tank rises to the point that no more room exists for more gas at a given temperature. As the temperature rises, more liquid boils until equilibrium is again reached. Under normal ambient temps here on earth, all things are safe and happy. A tank exposed to fire is a problem, but that is another story.

As propane gas is allowed to escape, into the regulator and pipes on its’ way to an appliance, the liquid propane again boils to equalize at somewhere around 80-150 psi.

The beauty of this fuel is that is 1 gallon of liquid makes 270 gallons of vapor. Depending on ambient temperature a 30 lb. tank holds 4-5 liquid gallons, or up to 1350 gallons of usable gaseous fuel.

When one transfers propane with a device like above, the liquid is the goal. But as the liquid moves into the empty tank, it boils off trying to fill the space. So, allowing a little vapor to escape via the mentioned vapor valve, allows more liquid in. Turning the full tank upside down makes certain only liquid is flowing out.

Two half full tanks is the best outcome to be expected. A pretty fire ball or maybe a quick trip around the yard on the top of a propane tank are the other possibilities.

The 20% space that should be left at the top of a full tank is the vapor space, to allow all this to work. At a propane fill facility, a pump is used to overcome the pressure inside the tank, and forces liquid in. The overfill-protection-device (OPD) was developed as a safety to prevent the pump forcing liquid into the vapor space. It is simply a float that shuts to seal and stop the flow when liquid reaches the 80% full level.
Yup, I hear ya, and thus my disclaimer. I believe these "transfer devices" became illegal to produce with the OPD regs, as I can't find them with the OPD fittings. The gas space is the trick to find with the amount of time in the fridge. I have come to default a little on the safe side and settle for about 3/4 full on the 1# bottle. When I use up the left over pre-OPD 20#ers, I'm done with playing around. It has however, saved some $, as the 1#ers are rediculously overpriced.
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Old 08-23-2011, 07:21 PM   #9
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30 lb. tank holds 4-5 liquid gallons, or up to 1350 gallons of usable gaseous fuel.[/SIZE][/FONT]


Two half full tanks is the best outcome to be expected. A pretty fire ball or maybe a quick trip around the yard on the top of a propane tank are the other possibilities.

The 20% space that should be left at the top of a full tank is the vapor space, to allow all this to work. At a propane fill facility, a pump is used to overcome the pressure inside the tank, and forces liquid in. The overfill-protection-device (OPD) was developed as a safety to prevent the pump forcing liquid into the vapor space. It is simply a float that shuts to seal and stop the flow when liquid reaches the 80% full level.
Actually a so called 20 lb tank holds 4.7 gallons of liquid and a 30 is around 7.2 gallons, plus or minus a bit depending on the valve dip tube length

It is possible to transfer the entire contents from one tank to another of the same size as long as the bleeder is open. Have done it many times. I have also filled 3 30 lb tanks from an inverted 100 lb tank and still hd a bit left. Apparently the small amount of gas lost through the bleeder is not a big deal.

Many filling stations will open the bleeder when filling which I personally feel is best although some will still try to fill by weight and I have encountered a few that will pump in gas until the OPD forces a shut off.
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Old 08-24-2011, 10:09 AM   #10
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I personally refill the 1# tanks, but I limit refills to 6...I use a magic marker to remind me as to how many times I have refilled...I always aim the tank away from the rig, and putting the empty tank in the freezer for about 30 minutes makes a load difference...the monetary savings are huge in the long run...yep, you have to turn the tank upside down, and you have to be conscious that you are dealing with a flammable (read EXPLOSIVE) material, but so far, I've been lucky...m
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Old 08-25-2011, 12:50 PM   #11
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I found a black box under the dash near the fuse panel, need to know why power to it was cut by first PO, second PO or by technician solving problem. It measures 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 x 1 1/8 . Not all wires were cut. When it is plugged in electric door locks work but don't when disconnected. Is this the box for the optional remote button entry? No remote came with unit. Does anybody have the schematic for installing remote entry system? Thanks
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Old 08-27-2011, 02:28 PM   #12
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Interesting Find!

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I found a black box under the dash near the fuse panel,............ Thanks
Wow, what an interesting find! I hope someone out there can shed some light on it.
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Old 08-28-2011, 09:15 AM   #13
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I think you're on the right trail with the electric lock biz. I found a similar mystery 'black box' in the same area, which I had to remove to access the fuse block. In my case it turned out to be the brain for the after market cruise control, which does still work, sort of. The longer it's on the slower
we go-----------------------Pete
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Old 09-07-2011, 07:33 AM   #14
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I had a black box like that in that area as well. Mine was the brain for the washer fluid low, and coolant low lights.
Rob
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