Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-03-2015, 09:54 AM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
1983 31' Airstream310
Bossier City , Louisiana
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 26
310 Interior Painting

Have a 1983 310 and wand to paint the interior "plastic" walls.

Has anyone done this? What is the best way you prep them for painting?

I will be having a friend paint the whole interior with a spray gun. Do I need to primer first then final color coat? Can regular interior paint be used or do I need to use a special "plastic" paint?

Thank You All for your help!!


Gman1957
__________________

__________________
Gman1957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 10:46 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
310 Interior Painting

I haven't painted a huge expanse of plastic, but here is what I would do.

I would clean the surface with a soap and water, than a good prep solvent, sand everything to a 220 scratch, wash with prep solvent again, and paint with an industrial epoxy paint, (Sherwin Williams, or Imron, etc).

I would not prime, and I would not paint plastic with a latex house paint.

What you DONT want is to have a peeling problem a year or two down the road.

Sanding the entire interior sounds daunting, but with a good dual action sander it can be done in a hard days work. An air powered sander is best, but it will take a REAL air compressor to run one, Milwaukee makes a pretty good electric dual action sander.

Brevi tempore!
__________________

__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 10:51 AM   #3
Rivet Master
 
mayco's Avatar

 
1982 31' Airstream 310
champaign , Illinois
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2,766
Krylon Fusion has a great reputation for its performance on plastic. Ive done a few pieces with it, interior AC covers and some dash parts. Ive liked it.
__________________
mayco is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 11:00 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
In my view it would be very difficult to paint an area that large with spray cans without leaving numerous dry edges.

I think Rustolium through a spray gun will provide good results without breaking the bank, and it is available off the shelf at big box stores. Two or three gallons would likely do the job.

Mask off EVERYTHING that overspray might mess up, even areas outside of windows that you will need to have open for ventilation.

Use a box fan to PUSH fresh air into the trailer while painting.


Brevi tempore!
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 12:21 PM   #5
2 Rivet Member
 
1983 31' Airstream310
Bossier City , Louisiana
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 26
Thank You ALL for contributing -- some Great Ideas!!

John
Gman1957
__________________
Gman1957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 04:04 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
1974 31' Sovereign
1979 23' Safari
Wayland , New York
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,627
Images: 3
If he's using a pro style spray gun go talk to an auto paint shop. They make primer for plastic bumpers on cars that would work well. You definitely want to be sure you have nice clean walls and use something specifically for plastic. If it's not you'll likely have peeling problems later on as most regular paint doesn't stick well to plastic.
__________________
HiJoeSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2015, 05:23 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
310 Interior Painting

They do make lots of products, primers, and additives for painting plastic bumpers etc..... It all costs money, and in my experience none of it is required or even beneficial when painting properly cleaned and sanded plastic.

Some folks will disagree with me, but in over twenty years of painting plastic bumpers etc., I have never had an issue.

A good quality paint will stick on properly prepared plastic. Everyone has seen paint peeling from plastic, but this is usually because someone wants to spray bomb something without performing any surface prep at all.

Peeling paint is usually always a result of not sanding. And, most primer that is not top coated in a set amount of time (often 8 hours) will require sanding for good top coat adhesion. Priming a big area can often require double sanding....


Brevi tempore!
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2015, 01:29 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
1974 31' Sovereign
1979 23' Safari
Wayland , New York
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,627
Images: 3
Good surface prep is definitely key. And I will agree with j Morgan that with really good surface cleaning and sanding you can likely get a good bond that will stick as long as it's not subject to a lot of direct wear/rubbing.
I experimented with some Benjamin Moore aura a while ago. The aura stuck well to the plastic as long as you weren't trying to rub it off with a finger nail, then it scraped off but was still fairly tough. The aura I put over flat krylon(think of it as primer) for plastic stuck even better and really didn't want to come off even when scraping with a finger nail. So a premium self priming paint should do a good job.
Cleaning with good degreaser (TSP in water, wipe with sponge well, wear gloves, rinse well) and then wiping with a little solvent, light sanding, wiping off dust, then painting and you should be able to get good results. You want the surface as clean as possible and a little roughness for something for the paint to grip.

One thing I've learned over the years is if you find a paint you think you may want to use, call the mfg direct on their support line, generally they have experts on the other end of those lines that can be very helpful and much more technically knowledgable than someone in a big box paint section.

Since I'm not nearly familiar with the motor homes as trailers, are the "plastic walls" the vinyl sheeting applied to the aluminum interior skin in a 310.
__________________
HiJoeSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 02:15 AM   #9
2 Rivet Member
 
1983 31' Airstream310
Bossier City , Louisiana
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 26
Thank You ALL again for being willing to share knowledge and experience!! Great thoughts and techniques have been given to me to try along with very sound advice,

HiJoeSilver the walls actually seem to be a hard plastic not a vinyl and they are riveted to the internal wall beams. (I havn't removed one so someone like dadstoy who has can answer better than I.

John
Gman1957
__________________
Gman1957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 08:39 AM   #10
Rivet Master
 
bkahler's Avatar

 
1974 20' Argosy 20
Richmond , Kentucky
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,356
John,

I think you'll find the interior walls are sheet aluminum with a thin layer of vinyl laminated on. I have not heard of any Airstream with plastic walls inside. Only plastic I know of is the ABS front and rear headliners.

Brad
__________________
Air forums # 1674
1974 20' Argosy Motor Home
1974 31' Excella trailer (parting out, as of 4/1/2015 I have wheels, brake drums, windows & holding tanks left to sell)
bkahler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 02:39 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
1974 31' Sovereign
1979 23' Safari
Wayland , New York
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,627
Images: 3
I'm like minded with bkahler, most likely vinyl clad aluminum. Check an inconspicuous spot with a knife to check. That vinyl can be removed, another option. If it's the vinyl you'll really want something that will stick well to plastic.
__________________
HiJoeSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 03:52 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
mayco's Avatar

 
1982 31' Airstream 310
champaign , Illinois
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2,766
We thought long and hard about painting our 310 interior and decided in the end not to...the old saying "once you paint you cant go back". We scrubbed the heck out of the vinyl walls and they turned out good enough, at least they are clean and neutral enough to work with. I should have read your original post more careful, I saw "plastic" and immediately thought about all the ABS plastic in our rigs from those years. (82 like ours more than any I think). I have gotten rid of most of the heavy fabrics, reapholstered, changed lighting to modern recessed puck LED, ETC ETC. The vinyl wall covering is much less offensive with the other changes now. That vinyl is a quality product and tough as nails to hold up as well as it has for 35 yrs.

We have decided t paint some of the plastic components though. This past weekend I did the plastic half wall to the right of the entry door. I used the Krylon Fusion in a rattle can. I like the stuff but obviously you couldnt do your entire walls with rattle cans. Not sure if it comes in quart or gallon liquid, might be worth checking out.

Old original stained abs half wall:
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1444164600.386318.jpg
Views:	54
Size:	75.9 KB
ID:	249893

Newly painted with Krylon (minus table and cover plates)
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1444164680.959505.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	69.8 KB
ID:	249894

Good luck on your project and keep us posted.

Mike


Sent from my iPad using Airstream Forums
__________________
mayco is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 05:01 PM   #13
Airstream Driver
 
PeterH-Airstreamer's Avatar

 
1997 30' Excella
1983 31' Airstream310
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,375
Images: 51
Any Paint that will fail the fingernail test has a poor bond IMHO and should be avoided..
I painted an ABS front ceiling some 15 years ago, by first sanding it, than cleaning with a solvent and then using a high quality oil base primer like Zinsser Coverstain. It never showed any signs of failure until I sold the MOhome a few years ago.
After you created an successful bond, you may use whatever paint you desire as a finish coat.
The vinyl clad aluminum is whole different story, since it is still "off-gasing" adhesive, which causes it to be sticky and attract dust. We have used a mixture of vinegar and hydrogen Peroxide or just rubbing alcohol to clean the sticky stuff. It will come back after some time, thats why I think that there is not a foolproof way of painting it "fingernail proof".
One could strip all the vinyl off and go with the alu look, but this is not possible in the bathrooms, since the vinyl is glued to wood paneling.
In the Bathroom of my previous 345, I stripped all the vinyl, floated and primed the surface and finished it with a venetian plaster trowel finish.
In the Kitchen of the same 345, I applied a specialty wallpaper primer for glossy surfaces and installed grasscloth and clear coated for water protection. It held up well too.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	newbath.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	754.3 KB
ID:	249900   Click image for larger version

Name:	Kitchen1.jpg
Views:	47
Size:	509.2 KB
ID:	249901  

__________________
1990 29' Excella Trailer
1996 Airstream B190
1997 30' Excella Trailer
AIR #13
PeterH-Airstreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 06:21 PM   #14
Dazed and Confused
 
Isuzusweet's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1983 31' Airstream310
Hillsburgh , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,431
@Gman1957

DON'T DO IT. Seriously, I have seen first hand a painted AS Moho and it was't pretty. Flaking, peeling, cracks as the interior vinyl covered aluminum skin flexes back and forth on itself. The next owner spent days stripping it off to the original vinyl covering. By all means paint the front and back end caps or other plastic pieces that can be removed, but don't paint the interior walls.

If you want to modernize things in your moho strip out all the interior gables and revinyl them as I did. Adding new components makes the interior seem alive and refreshed.

Old interior....

Fred's Airstream Archives @ ViewRVs.com - 1983 Airstream Classic 310 Turbo Diesel Motorhome 31' Motorhome (K)

New interior, (not totally finished yet)....couches have since been recovered but haven't taken photo's

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f311...s-97332-4.html

Again, don't paint interior walls, you'll regret it and it will lower your resale value.

Cheers
Tony
__________________

__________________
Per Mare, Per Terram and may all your campaigns be successful.

Its a recession when your neighbor loses his job; its a depression when you lose your own. "Harry S Truman"
Isuzusweet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Interior painting question? JoshuaTonbo General Interior Topics 19 05-28-2016 09:24 PM
1982 turbo diesel 310 :: 2013 Airstream turbo diesel 310 mayco Airstream Registry Discussions 1 07-28-2015 12:58 PM
Painting interior vinyl werty5926 Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 11 11-03-2010 02:35 AM
Painting Interior walls, Ceiling DJbyRequest General Interior Topics 37 05-29-2005 10:51 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.