Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-11-2006, 03:13 PM   #15
Rivet Master
 
TomW's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Huntsville , Alabama
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,918
Images: 2
I take it your friends are in the California area also?

I guess I should have also asked "... and what area are you finding 100 amp service?"

Thanks,
Tom
__________________

TomW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2006, 03:19 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
guy99's Avatar
 
1984 31' Airstream310
Dunsmuir , California
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,336
Images: 16
Actually, they travel throughout the US, as we have. I haven't noticed a regional pattern. Usually if the site has a 50 amp plug it has 50 amp power. In many cases only a limited number of sites will have 50 amp power. Often these cost a few dollars more. The only time I'll pay more for 50 amps is when it is hot and muggy and I want to be able to run the back AC.
__________________

__________________
If you want others to be happy, practice compassion.
If you want to be happy, practice compassion - The Dalai Lama

1984 310 Limited Motorhome
Courtesy Parking (W/S/E/Wi-Fi) on I-5 in Northern California, 70 miles from Oregon border
guy99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2006, 03:40 PM   #17
Retired Moderator
 
john hd's Avatar
 
1992 29' Excella
madison , Wisconsin
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,644
Images: 40
the devil is in the details....

tom etal,

50 vs. 100 amps is confusing if you are talking about single phase loads vs. 2 phase loads.

imagine this, a single phase load of 30 amps runs thru a breaker to the load and returns on the neutral wire. 30 amps each way phase and neutral.

now lets think about a 50 amp load on a 240 volt circuit, 50 amps travels thru a breaker and returns on the other phase wire thru the other breaker NOT the neutral.

a pure 240 load at 50 amps will have zero amps on the neutral wire.

can you pull 100 amps of single phase load thru a 50 amp rv connector? in theory you could, in reality no. (that is what they taught me at lineman school)

so, the manufacturers of rv pedestals will set them up for two 50 amp circuits because they are in fact actually a 240 volt outlet capible of providing 50 amps on each phase in and out, not on the neutral.

you can run 50 amps thru one single phase without tripping the breaker phase to ground.

if it was set up to be one 30 and one 20 amp breaker on 2 different poles you would blow the breaker in the above scenario.

simple? perhaps not!

john
__________________
you call them ferrets, i call them weasels.
john hd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2006, 04:15 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
garry's Avatar
 
1969 31' Sovereign
Broken Arrow , Oklahoma
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,362
Images: 7
To simplify:For 30 amp service:A 30 amp campground pedestal is wired for 120vac with a 30 amp circuit breaker. You plug your RV 3 prong electrical connector into the panel and you have 30 amp 120vac service. If you try to pull more than 30 amps the breaker will trip so you are limited to 30 amps by the breaker.
Inside the 30 amp RV you have a distribution box with a 30 amp main breaker and several 15 or 20 amp breakers that feed different loads in the RV all of which are 120vac. The main breaker in the RV also will protect you from pulling more than 30 amps by tripping.

For 50 amp service:A 50 amp campground pedestal is wired for 240vac with two 50 amp breakers (100 amps). You plug in your RV four prong electrical connector and you are protected by two 50 amp circuit breakers. 50 amps on each leg.

Inside the 50amp RV the distribution panel is wired so the 240vac is divided into two 120vac legs protected by 50 amp breakers. These legs (L1 & L2) feed the 120vac through 15 to 30 amp circuit breakers to power the 120vac appliance loads. You might have a washer/ dryer and 2nd AC on one leg and everything else of the other leg. Each leg is 180 degrees out of phase and 120vac

. Hope this helps.
__________________
garry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2006, 04:20 PM   #19
Rivet Master
 
guy99's Avatar
 
1984 31' Airstream310
Dunsmuir , California
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,336
Images: 16
Clarification

I used the term campround loosely. I really meant many RV parks have 50 amp power, not govenment operated campgrounds or parks.
__________________
If you want others to be happy, practice compassion.
If you want to be happy, practice compassion - The Dalai Lama

1984 310 Limited Motorhome
Courtesy Parking (W/S/E/Wi-Fi) on I-5 in Northern California, 70 miles from Oregon border
guy99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 10:39 AM   #20
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by guy99
I have used 50 amp service to run both AC's on many occasions.

So, when we are parked and have access to a 50 amp rv plug and I want to run the rear AC I use a special pig-tail which I wired myself. One end is a 4 wire male 50 amp plug, this branches into two 30 amp female plugs. One of the female plugs is wired to the A leg, the neutral, and the ground from the 50 amp plug. The other female plug is wired to the B leg, the neutral, and the ground from the 50 amp plug.

I plug the main coach 30 amp plug to one of the female plugs. I run a 30 amp extension cord from the other female plug to the generator compartment where I unplug the rear AC from the socket from the generator and plug it into the extension cord.
This seems like a simple solution but I am concerned about one issue. When on shore power what happens if the selector switch above the kitchen is switched to "rear A/C"? Does that send both legs (and therefore 2 out of phase 120V circuits i.e. 208 volts) to the rear A/C?

Jeff
__________________
Honkity Hank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 11:05 AM   #21
Rivet Master
 
87MH's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Texas Airstream Harbor , Zavalla, in the Deep East Texas Piney Woods on Lake Sam Rayburn
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,435
Images: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honkity Hank
This seems like a simple solution but I am concerned about one issue. When on shore power what happens if the selector switch above the kitchen is switched to "rear A/C"? Does that send both legs (and therefore 2 out of phase 120V circuits i.e. 208 volts) to the rear A/C?
Jeff:

Please do not confuse 3 phase circuitry (208 volt nominal) with single phase 240.


You MUST have an isolator circuit installed if you plan to run the rear AC sometimes off of the kitchen selector switch, and sometimes off of the secondary 20 amp shore base line.


As far as the rear AC operation and secondary shore base line installation (with the kitchen selector switch), you might find this thread helpful.


http://www.airforums.com/forum...tch-17351.html

If you could borrow or purchase the wiring diagram for your MH it explains a lot about how the whole system operates - if you have specific questions about exactly where the various switches and electrical boxes are located several of us here in the Forums could help you.
__________________
Dennis

"Suck it up, spend the bucks, do it right the first time."

WBCCI # 1113
AirForums #1737

Trailer '78 31' Sovereign

Living Large at an Airstream Park on the Largest Lake Totally Contained in Texas
Texas Airstream Harbor, Inc.
87MH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2006, 11:24 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
guy99's Avatar
 
1984 31' Airstream310
Dunsmuir , California
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,336
Images: 16
My 310 doesn't have a selector switch to allow you to run the rear ac. My switch just switches from the front ac to the microwave and back.

But, in my case it wouldn't matter since the plug that the rear ac plugs into would act as an isolator. Either the ac is plugged into that plug which is powered by the generator, or, it is plugged into the separate power cord that I run from the power source. It could never be connected to both simultaneously.
__________________
If you want others to be happy, practice compassion.
If you want to be happy, practice compassion - The Dalai Lama

1984 310 Limited Motorhome
Courtesy Parking (W/S/E/Wi-Fi) on I-5 in Northern California, 70 miles from Oregon border
guy99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2006, 06:54 AM   #23
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 52
87MH has a nice write up here http://www.airforums.com/forum...tch-17351.html
Based on this and a review of my wiring diagram I am going to go with the guy99 methodology. I have not checked to see how the rear A/C is connected to the genset so I may have to wire in disconnect or a receptacle to prevent the shore power from backfeeding the generator .

Will let you all know how it works out when I get to this, hopefully will get this done before spring break which seems to be getting here faster and faster.
__________________
Honkity Hank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 04:59 PM   #24
Silver Bullet
 
choctawmel's Avatar

 
1986 34.5' Airstream 345
choctaw , Oklahoma
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 669
Images: 1
I wired my '86 345 with a second 30A pigtail so I can run both A/C's. Hooked a 30A male plug into a breaker box in the back, then ran wire up and under the front dinette seat and split off the output from the generator relay box to the rear A/C with a double pole double throw 30A switch. Flip it one way and it works with the panel, the other way and I got two shores lines. Usually use a double 15A plug adapter to hook the second 30A plug to.
Makes all the difference in the world when it’s 100+ out, or when the wife want to use the oven.
A new 15K A/C is on my list of things to do.

mel
'86 345
__________________
choctawmel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 09:28 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
Over59's Avatar
 
1959 26' Overlander
Putnam , Connecticut
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,064
Images: 37
Sounds to me like someone is going to light themselves up. Seen it once, real ugly. I'm confident in any 110 ac or 12v wiring. It can bite you, even kill you under the right conditons. But this 220 stuff I don't go near. It takes knowledge, skill, and experience to be safe. Hire a pro. You also have the issue of floating the ground. I wonder how many have put standard panels in their trailers with a common neutral and ground connection.
__________________
Over59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 09:51 PM   #26
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Over59
. . . I wonder how many have put standard panels in their trailers with a common neutral and ground connection.
Don't know, but it's always worth another mention.

A nice feature of the Progressive Dynamics breaker panel is it comes with separate neutral and ground bars, and mounted in a plastic non-conductive box.

http://www.progressivedyn.prawnserve...p?ProductID=65
__________________

__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
30 amp or 15 amp / 59 Traveler bkpine Electrical - Systems, Generators, Batteries & Solar 14 09-14-2006 08:10 PM
30 amp box davidz71 Electrical - Systems, Generators, Batteries & Solar 10 10-23-2005 10:38 AM
Towing Experience app Tow Vehicles 9 04-19-2004 10:51 PM
conversion from vacuum/disk to electric brakes excelladep Brakes & Brake Controllers 2 05-30-2002 12:54 PM
Meter for amps davidz71 Electrical - Systems, Generators, Batteries & Solar 5 05-09-2002 11:21 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.