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Old 03-26-2010, 07:22 AM   #113
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Thanks.
I'll be there when the doors open this morning.
But I'd be happy to hold off if folks want to check it out too.
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Old 03-26-2010, 07:33 AM   #114
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Cool Just sayin'

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We are all packed and ready to hit the road. We are just waiting to send Ava to school and be marked as present, then an hour later take her out to go to a "Doctors appointment"...

Have brisket, have bacon, have scrapple, and a serious itchy foot.
Your timing might actually pretty damn good to tackle your arch nemesis Frank. The devil's own bridge CAN be had at certain times..........

I know you've got an opinion Rick. What do you think of young Francis's chances today?
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Old 03-26-2010, 07:40 AM   #115
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Your timing might actually pretty damn good to tackle your arch nemesis Frank. The devil's own bridge CAN be had at certain times..........

I know you've got an opinion Rick. What do you think of young Francis's chances today?

I assume you are talking about the Infamous GWB? Can't count the number of timies we have crossed that one. Heading north you MUST keep left for the upper level. Big fines for getting caught on the lower. Crossing northbound any time today will be fine. Just take it slow, road conditions are comparable to goat paths. Last count; 1,278 pot holes from the Jersey State Line to the canal bridge.
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Old 03-26-2010, 07:47 AM   #116
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Yea, I was just thinking about all the potholes. I haven't seen Stamford or Norwalk I95 lately. I assume it's chopped up there as usual? Crossing GWB after 3:30pm on a Friday is asking for trouble IMO.
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Old 03-26-2010, 08:08 AM   #117
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Yea, I was just thinking about all the potholes. I haven't seen Stamford or Norwalk I95 lately. I assume it's chopped up there as usual? Crossing GWB after 3:30pm on a Friday is asking for trouble IMO.
North-bound should be a breeze. Just remember the UPPER LEVEL! Don't forget Don, Penzy's does NOT take American Express.
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Old 03-26-2010, 10:18 AM   #118
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Paul, I am going to venture to say you need to put a turkey in that smoker with some cherry. My Father has done this two Thanksgivings now and the taste is a PERFECT 11.

Did say some cann't do. Just not for newbee's. I suspect he uses chips and not sticks.... Smokin a whole turkey is prove there is a God. I stick to the mild woods ect for Duck.... and of course BEEF
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Old 03-26-2010, 10:23 AM   #119
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We're heading out now and it looks like we will be bringing blue skies. I'll call Don for a landing clearance once we get closer to Easton. We'll see you in about 3.5 hours, the good Lord Willing and the Creek don't rise.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:27 AM   #120
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.... in Memphis and they claim to have better bar-b-que than Texas. It will be hard to beat Austin's Green Mesquite.
I'm sure it's good but since BBQ was invented in KC I know it's better there.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:42 AM   #121
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Wow~

Holy Cow! I had no idea you had the shell off! Very brave of you. Good luck.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:57 AM   #122
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I'm sure it's good but since BBQ was invented in KC I know it's better there.
Sorry Skip, but you have been sadly misinformed on the true origins of BBQ: the history of pigs and the history of BBQ are closely intertwined, and pigs (far more than cattle or poultry) were a staple food throughout the South well before the Civil War. Often, hog-slaughtering time was a joyous community-wide occasion, and it was inevitable that, sooner or later, a whole animal would be roasted and shared to celebrate the occasion. BBQ historians are generally of the opinion that the traditional Southern barbecue grew out of these gatherings.

The history of the BBQ sauce is less murky. Prior to the invention of effective refrigeration, a common problem was how to preserve meat for long periods. In North Carolina a common method was to “cure” meat, particularly pork, in a mixture of vinegar, water, salt, and peppers (still the definitive North Carolina-style BBQ sauce). Vinegar was employed as the preservative, as a cheap and plentiful bactericide.

The original idea of adding mustard and mustard-based sauces still predominates in South Carolina and in some parts of eastern North Carolina, to this day. Adding tomato ketchup to produce something resembling modern-day BBQ sauce apparently arose in Virginia and Georgia.

In the half century preceding the Civil War, large outdoor BBQ parties had become entrenched in Southern culture, most often featuring a whole roasted pig. Plantation owners hosted large, festive BBQs to entertain neighbors and friends, or to feed their slaves. By the nineteenth century, barbecue had evolved into a standard feature of church picnics and political rallies: Barbecue, lemonade, and corn whiskey became a common and inexpensive way to buy political allegiance.

The addition of using Beef and Poultry for a BBQ was considered an attack on the orgins of what was considered the true BBQ. The meat was the foundation and the ingrediants and the process the framing. So as you can see, Texas and Kansas City along with Memphis adapted the process and ingredients to their own regional style.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:58 AM   #123
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Holy Cow! I had no idea you had the shell off! Very brave of you. Good luck.
Actually Pam, Don and Paul realized that the smoker wasn't big enough to cook enough for the weekend, so buy gutting VT they now have a real "Smoke House"!
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Old 03-26-2010, 01:02 PM   #124
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Sorry Skip, but you have been sadly misinformed on the true origins of BBQ: the history of pigs and the history of BBQ are closely intertwined, and pigs (far more than cattle or poultry) were a staple food throughout the South well before the Civil War. Often, hog-slaughtering time was a joyous community-wide occasion, and it was inevitable that, sooner or later, a whole animal would be roasted and shared to celebrate the occasion. BBQ historians are generally of the opinion that the traditional Southern barbecue grew out of these gatherings.

The history of the BBQ sauce is less murky. Prior to the invention of effective refrigeration, a common problem was how to preserve meat for long periods. In North Carolina a common method was to ďcureĒ meat, particularly pork, in a mixture of vinegar, water, salt, and peppers (still the definitive North Carolina-style BBQ sauce). Vinegar was employed as the preservative, as a cheap and plentiful bactericide.

The original idea of adding mustard and mustard-based sauces still predominates in South Carolina and in some parts of eastern North Carolina, to this day. Adding tomato ketchup to produce something resembling modern-day BBQ sauce apparently arose in Virginia and Georgia.

In the half century preceding the Civil War, large outdoor BBQ parties had become entrenched in Southern culture, most often featuring a whole roasted pig. Plantation owners hosted large, festive BBQs to entertain neighbors and friends, or to feed their slaves. By the nineteenth century, barbecue had evolved into a standard feature of church picnics and political rallies: Barbecue, lemonade, and corn whiskey became a common and inexpensive way to buy political allegiance.

The addition of using Beef and Poultry for a BBQ was considered an attack on the orgins of what was considered the true BBQ. The meat was the foundation and the ingrediants and the process the framing. So as you can see, Texas and Kansas City along with Memphis adapted the process and ingredients to their own regional style.
Let's not confuse the issue with actual facts. I was hoping to start a heated debate with my poor information!!! perhaps even causing threats og bodily harm when I got to Don's house.
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:39 PM   #125
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Let's not confuse the issue with actual facts. I was hoping to start a heated debate with my poor information!!! perhaps even causing threats og bodily harm when I got to Don's house.
I'm worried Skip. First the offer to chop off fingers. Now the sheer gumption, spunk - dare I say, audacity - to question the origins of BBQ.

Hope you're still alive when I get there later in the afternoon.

p.s. If not, I call the Overlander!

Tom
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:43 PM   #126
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Originally Posted by rickandsandi View Post
Sorry Skip, but you have been sadly misinformed on the true origins of BBQ: the history of pigs and the history of BBQ are closely intertwined, and pigs (far more than cattle or poultry) were a staple food throughout the South well before the Civil War. Often, hog-slaughtering time was a joyous community-wide occasion, and it was inevitable that, sooner or later, a whole animal would be roasted and shared to celebrate the occasion. BBQ historians are generally of the opinion that the traditional Southern barbecue grew out of these gatherings.

The history of the BBQ sauce is less murky. Prior to the invention of effective refrigeration, a common problem was how to preserve meat for long periods. In North Carolina a common method was to “cure” meat, particularly pork, in a mixture of vinegar, water, salt, and peppers (still the definitive North Carolina-style BBQ sauce). Vinegar was employed as the preservative, as a cheap and plentiful bactericide.

The original idea of adding mustard and mustard-based sauces still predominates in South Carolina and in some parts of eastern North Carolina, to this day. Adding tomato ketchup to produce something resembling modern-day BBQ sauce apparently arose in Virginia and Georgia.

In the half century preceding the Civil War, large outdoor BBQ parties had become entrenched in Southern culture, most often featuring a whole roasted pig. Plantation owners hosted large, festive BBQs to entertain neighbors and friends, or to feed their slaves. By the nineteenth century, barbecue had evolved into a standard feature of church picnics and political rallies: Barbecue, lemonade, and corn whiskey became a common and inexpensive way to buy political allegiance.

The addition of using Beef and Poultry for a BBQ was considered an attack on the orgins of what was considered the true BBQ. The meat was the foundation and the ingrediants and the process the framing. So as you can see, Texas and Kansas City along with Memphis adapted the process and ingredients to their own regional style.
That's all well and good, but of course BEEF was far more plentiful than swine in Texas. So naturally BEEF became the BBQ of choice here, also before the Civil War. I'm not certain how BBQing beef could be considered an attack on Carolina-style BBQ, since the Carolinians never did it (or of they did, they did it so poorly that nobody bothers to talk about it ).

And smoking meats has long been a natural preservative in itself, that one goes back thousands, not just hundreds, of years.

Anyway, y'all be sure to enjoy your BBQ, I'm certain you'll have a grand time debating the best, and the origins of, BBQ into the wee hours, all whilst soaking up some suds as well.

I'm jealous, wish I were there (except that it's currently 78 degrees and bright sunshine here, of course ).

-Marcus
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