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Old 05-04-2014, 02:35 PM   #1
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1968 26' Overlander
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Propane lines on the bottom? Were these original?

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Old 05-04-2014, 02:41 PM   #2
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Not sure if that particular configuration is original, but propane lines are run on the outside so that if there's a leak gas doesn't build up inside the bellypan below the floor.
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Old 05-04-2014, 02:46 PM   #3
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Yes, propane is heavier than air, so the lines are always run outside of the bellypan. There should also be a shutoff for each appliance on the outside with the old trailers. A single piece of copper line (with no joints) is then run up and into the appliance itself. Sometimes there is a second shutoff at or in the appliance, but not always.
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Old 05-04-2014, 03:43 PM   #4
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Just finished up reconnecting all the propane lines on my '73 so I'm pretty familiar with what they look like and I would say yes, those are probably original. Looks like you have gas appliances on both sides hence the crossways look. On mine, only the fridge and the water heater were opposite so it was mostly on the curbside of the trailer.

I gotta ask though, how high is that trailer jacked up in the front? Looks like its sitting on the rear bumper. That cant be good for the plumbing back there, though it does make a nice cave for the pooch.
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Old 05-04-2014, 09:31 PM   #5
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Wow! We couldn't believe they were original! Someone used a jack and flattened the front line. We are going all electric so we're taking them off.Click image for larger version

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As to being lifted it was almost to bumper using a forklift. All plumbing (everything actually) has already been removed.
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:11 AM   #6
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I'd offer some words of caution with your jacking/lifting technique. These trailer frames have a lot of flex in them, and you are putting the whole unit in a very unnatural position, basically suspending it from the extreme ends. A 50 year old frame may very well be rusting through inside of that bellypan, and if it lets loose, not only could you turn your trailer into a fortune cookie, but if anyone is under it, really bad stuff will likely happen. A much safer way to go would be to jack each side of the trailer up, and slip some bricks/stacks of planks, etc., under the wheels. I found that with a stack of two 2x12s under each side of my trailer I had plenty of room to roll around under the trailer on a mechanic's creeper.

good luck!
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:42 AM   #7
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Thanks but believe me safety is always number one! What you are not seeing is the 2 extra safety catches
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Old 05-07-2014, 04:18 PM   #8
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Be safe

NEVER, EVER , use cement blocks or bricks to raise a trailer or vehicle ! Jack stands or wood cribbing are the proper ways to do it. I can assure you that recovering the body when they fail is not a pleasant experience.
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Old 05-07-2014, 04:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belegedhel View Post
I'd offer some words of caution with your jacking/lifting technique. These trailer frames have a lot of flex in them, and you are putting the whole unit in a very unnatural position, basically suspending it from the extreme ends. A 50 year old frame may very well be rusting through inside of that bellypan, and if it lets loose, not only could you turn your trailer into a fortune cookie, but if anyone is under it, really bad stuff will likely happen. A much safer way to go would be to jack each side of the trailer up, and slip some bricks/stacks of planks, etc., under the wheels. I found that with a stack of two 2x12s under each side of my trailer I had plenty of room to roll around under the trailer on a mechanic's creeper.

good luck!
You stated to jack up then put 2/12 under wheels, just stack 2/12s then pull on top safer than jacking up, if they slip use single 2/12 pull onto then onto stack I have did it this way since 1950s w/impl. trailers then AS since 1963
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:55 PM   #10
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Well, at the risk of steering this thread completely off track, let me try to reemphasize the point I was trying to make. If you haven't dropped the belly pan, you never know what shape your frame is in. I mean only to propose that having the weight of the trailer on the axles, and the wheels elevated, whether they get elevated by jacking up the trailer and putting planks under it, or by rolling the trailer up onto planks, patio bricks, bars of gold, etc. might be a safer way to give yourself some room to work under a trailer.

The frame on my '73 was so rotten that the rear 4 feet had to be replaced entirely, and the front had to be repaired extensively. You never would have guessed by just looking up under there, though. Had I put a jack stand under each frame rail where it meets the bumper, and lifted the A-frame with a forklift, the thing probably would have folded up like a fortune cookie, and anyone underneath wouldn't have to read the fortune to tell that their luck had run out.

Anyway sorry for the highjacking.
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