Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-07-2014, 03:11 AM   #1
1 Rivet Member
 
1966 22' Safari
tucson , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 15
new LP lines

Newbie here! Dumb question on the way......I'm restoring a "66" Safari and wonder if I should run new LP lines under my new floor and not under the belly pan. Also, instead of copper lines why not the LP rubber ones? Aside from being able to get to them down the road. Frankly, exposed LP lines connected to my belly pan seem like problem waiting to happen.
__________________

__________________
1966air is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2014, 04:58 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar

 
2008 34' Classic S/O
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 4,260
There's a reason those lines are run under the belly pan and not inside of it, and that is the code as I understand it. The code says there will be no connections other than the terminal connections inside the trailer. And, if the lines are inside the belly pan, a leak in a connection could accumulate in a low spot and if/when it got ignition it would be like a bomb. Besides, you would have to remove the belly pan to check connections, and to get to any shut off valves.

I understand wanting to simplify thing, but think yours is a bad idea.
__________________

__________________
Regards,
Steve

"The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it." George Orwell

'08 34' SO, '12 Ram 2500 4X4, Big 6 cylinder sludge burner.
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2014, 05:00 AM   #3
Formally 'tiger'
 
GeocamperAS's Avatar
 
1974 Argosy 28
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Wauwatosa , Wisconsin
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 543
Images: 37
I may be wrong but I believe there is a 'code' to follow. Like building codes. As far as LP gas lines, other than the final connection at the appliance, all fittings (T's and shut-off valves, etc) must be outside the trailer. Less chance of any leaks filling the cabin. I'm not sure of plastic lines.
Ask someone who restores trailers. Like Colin Hyde. He is here on the forums.
Either way I would install a LP detector in your unit.
__________________
Judging a person does not define who they are, it defines who YOU are.
GeocamperAS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2014, 05:21 AM   #4
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
Metairie , Louisiana
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeocamperAS View Post
I may be wrong but I believe there is a 'code' to follow.
Yes.

ANSI/NFPA 1192 covers the requirements for RVs:
Quote:
Venting requirements for propane appliances are specified where necessary.
Propane piping sizes are required to ensure a propane supply that provides for proper appliance performance.
Over fill protection devices (OPD) are required on all installed propane containers.
Propane line routing and accessibility - all joints in propane lines must be accessible for periodic leak testing and repair. Lines may not be installed in spaces where a nail or screw could pierce the line.
Fuel burning appliances must be listed for RV use and labeled by a nationally recognized testing agency that has found the product to be suitable for its intended use.
Sealed combustion and direct venting to the outside is required for all propane appliances, except for gas ranges, to provide for a complete separation of the combustion chamber from the interior atmosphere.
Each propane system must be tested upon final assembly to determine proper leak-free performance.
I've highlighted in red the applicable criterion that requires you to put the lines under the belly pan and not inside the belly pan. The quote is from an RVIA summary of ANSI/NFPA 1192, and is not complete. You may want to go to your local library and look up the standard for yourself to find out all of the requirements applicable to your task.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

"In a perfect world, I'd be given enough time to wrap up one emergency before the next one starts." —Freefall©2013
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2014, 10:43 AM   #5
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1966air View Post
Newbie here! Dumb question on the way......I'm restoring a "66" Safari and wonder if I should run new LP lines under my new floor and not under the belly pan.
Keep them outside the belly pan so you don't blow yourself up if there's a leak. Some people sleeve the lines with PEX or other flexible material for protection from gravel and other road hazards.

Quote:
Also, instead of copper lines why not the LP rubber ones? Aside from being able to get to them down the road. Frankly, exposed LP lines connected to my belly pan seem like problem waiting to happen.
Copper line used for LP will last for decades if it is not physically damaged while rubber hose has a limited life (10-20 years tops). As a result, hose should not be used anywhere where it cannot be readily inspected and replaced.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 05:48 AM   #6
4 Rivet Member
 
carl2591's Avatar
 
Garner, , North Carolina
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 269
I have seen a copper line with a yellow plastic cover used for gas lines in homes. they use yellow so it easy to spot and follow under a dark house. That would be the best stuff to use as the plastic can help protect the copper from rock or stuff that can kick under the AS going down the road.

That one of the things you do every so often is to have a nice bright flashlight and bend down and look under the rig to check the line, say after a good bit of traveling or if you happen to see debris on the road while traveling.

but YES keep in under belly pan and check .
__________________
Carl
Raleigh NC

not a Streamer yet but learning...
Timeshare owner/user since '99
carl2591 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 06:15 AM   #7
3 Rivet Member
 
1973 25' Tradewind
Augusta , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
Some people sleeve the lines with PEX or other flexible material for protection from gravel and other road hazards.
I do like that suggestion. The creative individual could use short pieces of alternating clear, blue, and red.

One a more serious note I seen the corrugated stainless steel tubing at the local home center and was considering this (as suggested in another post). Any experience with that. Also waiting on hearing what the "rock stars" suggest.

Looking at the VAP index episodes 114, 124, & 132 discuss LP lines. One could listen to these or immortalize yourself and call/email in.
__________________
DGJackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 06:28 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar

 
2008 34' Classic S/O
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 4,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGJackson View Post
I do like that suggestion. The creative individual could use short pieces of alternating clear, blue, and red.

One a more serious note I seen the corrugated stainless steel tubing at the local home center and was considering this (as suggested in another post). Any experience with that. Also waiting on hearing what the "rock stars" suggest.

Looking at the VAP index episodes 114, 124, & 132 discuss LP lines. One could listen to these or immortalize yourself and call/email in.

Don't know for sure, but I would be concerned about corrosion from dissimilar metals by covering copper with stainless steel. Some sort of plastic or rubber would be better IMHO.
__________________
Regards,
Steve

"The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it." George Orwell

'08 34' SO, '12 Ram 2500 4X4, Big 6 cylinder sludge burner.
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2014, 06:50 PM   #9
4 Rivet Member
 
carl2591's Avatar
 
Garner, , North Carolina
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGJackson View Post
I do like that suggestion. The creative individual could use short pieces of alternating clear, blue, and red.

One a more serious note I seen the corrugated stainless steel tubing at the local home center and was considering this (as suggested in another post). Any experience with that. Also waiting on hearing what the "rock stars" suggest.

Looking at the VAP index episodes 114, 124, & 132 discuss LP lines. One could listen to these or immortalize yourself and call/email in.

the corrugated SS lines are nice for sure but they are a bear to deal with.. always wanting to roll up on you. if you can get it rolled out and sorta bend back a bit to take the factory rolling out of it that is a great product. hard a hell to crush/dent, unlike copper, and has a nice protective covering on as well. it might be more costly compared to Copper stuff but more substantial for sure.

The connectors are a snap to use just read the book in the store to get correct cutting procedure.

I was in local lowes and a 25ft roll of 3/8 SS runs $39.00. Not all that bad. was looking at copper 50ft HVAC roll of 1/2" with capped end and nitrigon filled was $90.00 so the SS was a better deal.. go figure.
__________________
Carl
Raleigh NC

not a Streamer yet but learning...
Timeshare owner/user since '99
carl2591 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2014, 07:28 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
1974 Argosy 20
2014 20' Flying Cloud
Kooskia , Idaho
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,049
I don't believe that the corrugated SS is approved for RV's. I know the short flexible corrugated lines you can get in the stores (usually yellow) are not legal. They are limited in their flexing to very occasional use, like a range which needs to be moved out for service etc.

Airstream is still using copper, which is very expensive. They do protect it in a PEX sleeve in some locations. But then, we know Airstream still uses wood floors.... grin.
__________________
idroba is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2014, 07:41 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,836
Do NOT use corrugated gas lines on your RV!!!!! They will not survive the flexing an RV encounters traveling, and will end up leaking. RV code requires copper pipe and flare connections. Buy a good flaring tool and learn how to make flare connections. It's really not that difficult.

I protected all the gas lines under our trailer with pex. After seeing how much damage was done to the original gas lines under the trailer, it seems like cheap protection.

Chris
__________________

__________________
Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Broken gas lines Jenturnr LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 4 02-01-2012 07:39 PM
Hydraulic brake lines Bandits Brakes & Brake Controllers 2 01-17-2012 06:17 PM
Easy water removal from lines..worked 4 me Jim & Mitzi Winterizing, Storage, Carports & Covers 6 01-03-2012 06:20 PM
Before I go putting gas through lines?? Mrcrowley LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 9 10-04-2011 06:12 AM
LP Gas lines betsy LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 6 05-01-2011 05:46 PM





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.
Modal Click