Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-13-2014, 04:17 PM   #1
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Low pressure grill mod - Magma Cabo

For about a year now, I've had the Magma Cabo grill. They're expensive (usually around $200) but I got one on clearance at a West Marine store that was closing. The grill is great. It fits in the rear baggage compartment, has high heat, and is easy to disassemble for cleaning.

The grill came with a valve for use with disposable propane cylinders. I used it with a high-pressure hose and an Extend-a-Flow tee, one of the expensive ones with Acme threads.

The high pressure setup has just been a nuisance because liquid propane accumulates in the line overnight if it's left out due to the distillation effect when the line cools down faster than the tank. Then the regulator freezes up, or if we pack up to leave we have a dangerous amount of liquid propane stuck in the hose, at least what doesn't spray out when the thing is disconnected.

I've heard that frostbite from propane spray is the single largest cause of ER visits by cub scouts on camping trips, and I'm inclined to believe it.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	highpressure.jpg
Views:	151
Size:	73.8 KB
ID:	211851   Click image for larger version

Name:	grill1.jpg
Views:	128
Size:	134.2 KB
ID:	211852  

__________________

__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2014, 04:20 PM   #2
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
So despite the considerable expense I decided to change to a low pressure system this spring.

First I had to get a low pressure propane valve directly from Magma. The Cabo uses the low-flow version of the valve.

The high-pressure valve snaps off (it's held by a spring retaining ring) and the low one goes in its place. I'll keep the high-pressure valve on hand along with a disposable 16 ounce propane cylinder for those occasional situations where we want to grill somewhere away from the trailer.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	grill2.jpg
Views:	696
Size:	80.9 KB
ID:	211854  
__________________

__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2014, 04:25 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
pbearsailor's Avatar

 
1957 22' Caravanner
Port Hadlock , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 863
Got the same grill, and the low pressure change is getting closer to the top of my ToDo list.

-steve
__________________
Forum Thread: First She Had to Take a Ride on a Boat

Blog: My 57 Caravanner
pbearsailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2014, 04:26 PM   #4
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
After checking around I got the low pressure hoses and fittings from TejasSmokers.com.

I've added a low-pressure port on my Cayo and will add one this weekend on my Airstream. In both cases I'm using a 6" x 1/4" piece of pipe, and some neoprene lined clamps, to anchor the port to a piece of 1/2" thick oak stock. I painted the wood grey. The oak provides an anchor that can be riveted to the trailer to provide a secure attachment.

On the Cayo the outlet goes inside the propane compartment. On the Airstream it will go underneath, just in front of the axles, curbside. Here's a photo of the Cayo setup. Airstream photos will follow when I've finished the work on iti.

Haven't been on any trips but a "system test" shows that everything works as it should.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	grillhose.jpg
Views:	136
Size:	91.2 KB
ID:	211855   Click image for larger version

Name:	grill3.jpg
Views:	659
Size:	127.6 KB
ID:	211856  

Click image for larger version

Name:	propaneconnect.jpg
Views:	635
Size:	78.9 KB
ID:	211857  
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 02:12 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
How did you tie it into the existing propane system? Is it as simple as teeing into the copper pipe at a convenient spot and running a new copper line wherever, and connecting it to the quick-release connection?
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 02:42 PM   #6
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Yes, plus a few threaded fittings. I used copper flare tools and picked up the necessary fittings at a home center. I had a short length of suitable copper tubing left over from another project.

On the truck camper there isn't much room so the copper line has to make a loop and T into the main at the top. You can see it in the photo if you look closely.

I've done similar projects on four different stick houses over the years to connect the patio grill to natural gas or to the bulk propane tank. I've learned that the main challenge is to mount these securely so that nothing is damaged when someone eventually pulls on or trips over the hose. It's bound to happen sooner or later.

Which is why the piece of wood as a shim so the whole thing can be mounted as securely as possible and still far enough away from the skin that the release sleeve won't bind.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 10:46 PM   #7
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
More photos
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20140517_191805_450 (800x451).jpg
Views:	116
Size:	186.8 KB
ID:	212155   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20140517_191923_956 (800x451).jpg
Views:	123
Size:	161.5 KB
ID:	212156  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20140517_192151_315 (800x451).jpg
Views:	111
Size:	154.6 KB
ID:	212157   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20140517_192858_817 (800x451).jpg
Views:	106
Size:	143.9 KB
ID:	212158  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20140517_202436_401 (800x451).jpg
Views:	123
Size:	191.5 KB
ID:	212159  
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 02:47 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
Cool, thanks. Given your comment about people tripping, I'd be tempted to recess the connection under far enough that the hose is already laying on the ground and thus less likely to trip over. Of course that also relies on having a long enough hose.
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 03:17 PM   #9
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
There was just a question on this in another thread, and I'm replying here to add that after a full season of camping, this setup was fantastic.

I ended up also setting up an outdoor two-burner "hot plate" -- essentially a stove -- with a similar hose and a T fitting so I can run it either by itself or with the grill. Useful for keeping the heat out of the trailer when cooking on hot days.

I'm somewhat concerned that an accumulation of road grit may cause the outlet to jam, but so far keeping the dust cover on it, and a little wd-40 from time to time on the sleeve and balls, has kept it working smoothly.

Many advantages over the old high-pressure setup. It is no longer necessary to bleed the lines before disconnecting, I don't have to switch tanks around when one is empty (old setup because of the shape of the T fitting would not work on the roadside tank), the grill is much more reliable since it doesn't get the occasional shot of liquid propane affecting its regulator, and I can locate the cooking area in the middle of the curb side, a better spot than near the tongue.

The Magma grill does not get as hot as I would like but that, unfortunately, is true for me of many gas grills.
__________________

__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Baha California--Tecate, San Jose del Cabo handn Travel Beyond US/Canada 5 02-21-2015 06:04 PM
High Pressure vs. Low pressure Appliances emenriquez General Appliance Topics 2 06-15-2009 02:04 AM
Tire Pressure Gauges- Pressure Varies! Ray Eklund Tires 14 07-06-2008 09:34 AM
Low pressure / High pressure appliances Rick LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 1 06-15-2002 07:29 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.