Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-24-2012, 06:49 PM   #57
2 Rivet Member
 
1974 25' Tradewind
Saint Joseph , Louisiana
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 57
Fridge won't work on gas when traveling

My 74 gas/electric fridge works fine on either fuel/energy source when staionary but usually quits working when traveling on gas. I suspect the wind is blowing out the flame/pilot. Any suggestions for fixing this?
__________________

__________________
bhutch74ly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 06:58 PM   #58
retired USA/USAF

 
2001 30' Excella
Somerset , New Jersey
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,156
I have not had this problem with our first Airstream, an '85 Excella. In our newer one that is an '01 Excella the previous owner had it ( I think ). He said he installed a baffle to block the air forced in while driving and solved it. We were out west most of the summer with it without it happening. A simple solution if that's the cause.
__________________

__________________
Roger in NJ

" Democracy is the worst form of government. Except for all the rest"
Winston Churchill 1948

TAC - NJ 18

polarlyse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 07:24 PM   #59
4 Rivet Member
 
2000 30' Excella
Toledo , Ohio
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 413
You may be getting rust dropping down your flue tube when you are traveling and putting out the flame . You would need to pull the fridge out to clean it the baffle pulls out from the top of the flue . I had an Avion truck camper years ago that did the same thing until I cleaned it out . Thats my guess anyhow . les Grace wbcci14183
__________________
woodfox45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 10:30 AM   #60
2 Rivet Member
 
1974 25' Tradewind
Saint Joseph , Louisiana
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 57
I'll try fixing with a shield or baffle. I suspect the previous owner cut the bottom of the compartment to increase ventilation to the back of the unit. I would like to see pictures of an original refrigerator compartment to see if this is the case. The bottom of mine is partly open and sealed with hardware cloth.
__________________
bhutch74ly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 11:16 AM   #61
Rivet Master
 
aftermath's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Spokane , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by safari57 View Post
...Most of those who leave theirs on do so because they were told to do so by the sales guys at the dealership when given their run-through.
I realize that this is a place for opinions so I am not going to get all worked up about this ill informed statement. I suppose there might be "some" owners that do this but even that would be quite a slam at them. I try to make decisions based on as much information as I can get. So far, I have yet to see one single example of a disaster caused by a fridge running while going down the road. And, suppose that there was one out there somewhere, would one case preclude me from using my fridge in a way that it was designed and engineered to be used? Seeing a moho burn to the ground doesn't mean it was the result of a fridge problem. Most big fires are caused by gasoline and/or electrical problems.

If you are using a gasoline engine to move down the road, you probably should stay home, at least according to your logic. There are lots of actual examples of fires caused by faulty carburetors and fuel lines where trucks and RVs burn to the ground. Talk about a risk!

Again, and now I am starting to sound like Larry Flint, I would like to read about any case where a fire or explosion was CAUSED by the running of a fridge on the road or even at a filling station. I would like to offer up a million dollars, but I don't own a magazine.
__________________
aftermath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 11:30 AM   #62
Rivet Master
 
aftermath's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Spokane , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Len n Jeanne View Post
For those of us who don't want the risk....
Ah yes, let us consider the "risk".

Risk: "the chance of loss or perils to the subject matter of an insurance contract: also : the degree of probability of such loss." Websters New Collegiate Dictionary

We take risks every day. Simply driving to the store has a certain amount of risk yet we do not hesitate to do this on a daily basis. The issue in dealing with risk is understanding the whole concept of probability. What are the chances that I will get in a car accident (pretty good actually) versus having my trailer explode because I left the fridge on (virtually non existent). If you really want to worry, consider that partially filled gas tank riding just behind you. That is a real bomb ready to go off, just ask anyone involved with the Ford Pinto crashes of years ago.

If you choose to turn yours off, more power to you. If you don't want to deal with the "risk", you will probably sleep better at night. Good on 'ya.

P.S. I sleep like a baby every night even on my original mattress.
__________________
aftermath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 11:46 AM   #63
Moderator
 
DKB_SATX's Avatar

 
2017 26' Flying Cloud
1976 Argosy 28
Alamo Heights , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,401
Images: 1
Blog Entries: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhutch74ly View Post
I'll try fixing with a shield or baffle. I suspect the previous owner cut the bottom of the compartment to increase ventilation to the back of the unit. I would like to see pictures of an original refrigerator compartment to see if this is the case. The bottom of mine is partly open and sealed with hardware cloth.
That sounds like the same setup in my '75 Argosy. There's a fairly large hole in the subfloor covered in coarse wire mesh, and a similar hole in the belly pan below that. I initially had a problem with mine blowing out on the road, but found that the regulator that was on the trailer when I bought it was delivering propane at a bit under 9 inches of water at the refer, and the spec is 11 inches of water. A new regulator solved my problem.
__________________
— David

Zero Gravitas — 2017 Flying Cloud 26U | Il Progetto — 1976 Argosy 28 Center Bath | WBCCI# 15566

He has all of the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire. — Sir Winston Churchill
DKB_SATX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 05:32 PM   #64
2 Rivet Member
 
1974 25' Tradewind
Saint Joseph , Louisiana
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKB_SATX View Post
That sounds like the same setup in my '75 Argosy. There's a fairly large hole in the subfloor covered in coarse wire mesh, and a similar hole in the belly pan below that. I initially had a problem with mine blowing out on the road, but found that the regulator that was on the trailer when I bought it was delivering propane at a bit under 9 inches of water at the refer, and the spec is 11 inches of water. A new regulator solved my problem.
Thanks, I recently installed a new regulator but I don't have a clue how much pressure I have at the appliances. Any ideas on a simple way to check this to see that I have 11 inches of water pressure at the refer?
__________________
bhutch74ly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 05:37 PM   #65
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,402
Images: 5
You could buy or make a simple manometer. I'm sure there are instructions on the net.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 09:55 PM   #66
Rivet Master
 
safari57's Avatar
 
1951 21' Flying Cloud
1960 24' Tradewind
West Coast , BC
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,790
Images: 10
Send a message via MSN to safari57
Quote:
Originally Posted by aftermath View Post
I realize that this is a place for opinions so I am not going to get all worked up about this ill informed statement. I suppose there might be "some" owners that do this but even that would be quite a slam at them. I try to make decisions based on as much information as I can get. So far, I have yet to see one single example of a disaster caused by a fridge running while going down the road. And, suppose that there was one out there somewhere, would one case preclude me from using my fridge in a way that it was designed and engineered to be used? Seeing a moho burn to the ground doesn't mean it was the result of a fridge problem. Most big fires are caused by gasoline and/or electrical problems.

If you are using a gasoline engine to move down the road, you probably should stay home, at least according to your logic. There are lots of actual examples of fires caused by faulty carburetors and fuel lines where trucks and RVs burn to the ground. Talk about a risk!

Again, and now I am starting to sound like Larry Flint, I would like to read about any case where a fire or explosion was CAUSED by the running of a fridge on the road or even at a filling station. I would like to offer up a million dollars, but I don't own a magazine.

Aftermath - my choices are not based on some poster on a thread making statements they cannot back up or some ill informed individual who bases their decision on their "best guess based on their years of travel" but instead are based research I did about traveling with propane on with professional associations, including my insurance company (who I'm mandated by our government to insure through). You may not agree with it, but by following the guidelines of the people who deal with propane and risk assessment as a business I believe I am using common sense. You of course will do what you are comfortable with - I will follow the guidelines these professionals have recommended: (note that the bolding is mine, I also changed the print color to black in cases where the original was red or orange)

The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia

ICBC | trailer5.pdf

Before leaving a campground
• Close the valves for the sewer and gray water and unhook the septic system.
• Unhook the water hose and make sure that you have only enough water
with you to get to your next stop. (Extra water means extra weight.)
• If your RV has slide-outs or awnings, make sure they are retracted and fastened.
• Unhook the power line.
• Make sure that roof vents are closed and TV antennas and satellite dishes
are retracted.
• Check around inside to make sure that all items are properly stored and
there is nothing loose on a counter or table.
• Make sure that the fridge is locked.
• Turn off all pilot lights and all propane tanks. (bolding is mine)
• Put up the steps.
• Make sure that trailer jacks and supports are raised and secured.
• Move the picnic table if it’s in your way.
• Check around the campsite to make sure that nothing has been left behind.
• Make sure you have all your maps and know which way to go.
• Conduct a pre-trip inspection as described in chapter 3 of this guide.
• Check fuel gauge. Make sure you’ve got enough fuel.



And there is this:
Canadian Propane Association
Propane Safety | The Canadian Propane Association

RVs and Campers



If you and your family use a recreational vehicle (R.V.) or camper it is important to ensure all users are familiar with the manufacturer's written operating and maintenance instructions. If you are renting, ask for safety instructions. Use the same care and diligence when tending to the propane systems in your R.V. or camper as you would for those in your home or business. With respect to regulations specific to the use of R.V.s and campers in Canada:
  • In many provinces, regular inspection of the propane system on board by a qualified service technician is mandatory.
  • In most provinces, it's law that all appliances and pilot lights must be turned off and cylinder valves closed while travelling. (bolding is mine)
Contact the provincial Motor Vehicle Branch where you own, rent or operate an R.V. or camper to inquire about requirements that may apply to you.


And this from the same group (cut from a much larger document located here under Storage and Handling Safety
Reports & Fact Sheets | The Canadian Propane Association


Know the Rules for Transportation
The Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) regulations dictate strict requirements for transporting propane, which include among many other things, specific training, documentation, and placarding.




Securing Propane Containers on R.V.s and Campers
  1. Never use, store, or transport cylinders in the passenger space, or living area, of your R.V. or camper. When travelling in an R.V., all appliances and pilot lights
  1. must be turned off, and all cylinder valves must be closed. (bolding is mine)
So for me, given my insurance company does not recommend towing with propane on, which could become an issue if I'm in an accident, and also based on the other organizations who note that turning the propane off is required, I'll continue to do so. I think anyone who is concerned should contact their insurance company and follow whatever guidelines they have.
__________________
Barry & Donna
Life is short - so is the door on a '51 Flying Cloud (ouch)
safari57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 10:24 PM   #67
Don't forget your cat nap
 
Ag&Au's Avatar
 
Port Orchard , Washington
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 4,464
Images: 1
Question This is silly

Why this got stirred up again is beyond me. This has been discussed in so many threads so far.

A few points.
1. It is not necessary to all do it the same way.
2. If someone posts a idea contrary to yours it is not necessary to dispute it.
3. Let the OP weigh the opinions and pick the one he chooses.

Based on analysis of the posts in this thread, I would like to suggest the following compromise:

All Canadians drive with propane off.
All Americans drive with propane on.
If anyone asks this question again, first ask them where they live and then give them the appropriate answer.

Now lets find something interesting to discuss. Even polishing aluminum sounds more exciting.

Ken
__________________
Ag&Au is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 06:27 AM   #68
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by safari57 View Post
So for me, given my insurance company does not recommend towing with propane on, which could become an issue if I'm in an accident, and also based on the other organizations who note that turning the propane off is required, I'll continue to do so. I think anyone who is concerned should contact their insurance company and follow whatever guidelines they have.
Keep in mind that insurance companies are doing the same thing we are - sitting around, going, "Yeah, that could happen! Tell them not to do it so we have a way to deny the claim!"

To be fair, though, there was a picture posted a while back of a camper that was involved in an accident that damaged the water heater, and was leaking propane badly - the regulator also failed to do it's job and stop the excessive flow. But even then there was no fire - they caught it and shut off the tank valve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by w7ts View Post
Now lets find something interesting to discuss. Even polishing aluminum sounds more exciting.
Good idea! Let's talk about what hitch we should use, what tires we should use, how fast we should go, whether we use the shower in the camper, and what brand of batteries we should buy!
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 07:10 AM   #69
Rivet Master
 
Shacksman's Avatar
 
1960 28' Ambassador
Vintage Kin Owner
1998 25' Safari
Avonton , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,213
Quote:
Originally Posted by w7ts View Post
Why this got stirred up again is beyond me. This has been discussed in so many threads so far.

A few points.
1. It is not necessary to all do it the same way.
2. If someone posts a idea contrary to yours it is not necessary to dispute it.
3. Let the OP weigh the opinions and pick the one he chooses.

Based on analysis of the posts in this thread, I would like to suggest the following compromise:

All Canadians drive with propane off.
All Americans drive with propane on.
If anyone asks this question again, first ask them where they live and then give them the appropriate answer.

Now lets find something interesting to discuss. Even polishing aluminum sounds more exciting.

Ken
Guess I have to move South as I will drive with propane on and built baffals to keep the pilot lights on. I even drive with the furnace on in cold weather. Then again I can't move South as I don't even insure my trailers and that's a big NO NO in the South. If you see me coming, better stay way back
__________________
Doug & Terry
VAC - TAC ON-1
60 Ambassador Int.
98 Safari
1950 Spartan
1966 Globetrotter
Shacksman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 07:54 AM   #70
Rivet Master
 
safari57's Avatar
 
1951 21' Flying Cloud
1960 24' Tradewind
West Coast , BC
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,790
Images: 10
Send a message via MSN to safari57
Quote:
Originally Posted by w7ts View Post
Why this got stirred up again is beyond me. This has been discussed in so many threads so far.

A few points.
1. It is not necessary to all do it the same way.
2. If someone posts a idea contrary to yours it is not necessary to dispute it.
3. Let the OP weigh the opinions and pick the one he chooses.

Based on analysis of the posts in this thread, I would like to suggest the following compromise:

All Canadians drive with propane off.
All Americans drive with propane on.
If anyone asks this question again, first ask them where they live and then give them the appropriate answer.

Now lets find something interesting to discuss. Even polishing aluminum sounds more exciting.

Ken
Your points 1,2 and 3 are right on Ken.

I can see why people give up offering their opinions and doing the background research - they then spend their time having to justify their every comment. Very frustrating and disappointing.
What is funny is that when I was providing the background I did not include the US information which it would appear the Canadian associations either copied or came to the same conclusion on their own - I realized that I was going to get caught in this perpetual "it doesn't matter what the industry says" situation. As you note, we don't all have to do it the same way.

Now if I can just find my safety goggles I can get going on polishing my - what do you mean I have to wear safety goggles while polishing????

Enjoy the day. I think I'll go camping and have some stress free fun.
__________________

__________________
Barry & Donna
Life is short - so is the door on a '51 Flying Cloud (ouch)
safari57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.