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Old 07-21-2012, 11:28 PM   #15
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I'm with you, Safari. I saw the outcome of propane tank explosion on the back of a truck that was moving through the streets of London. Very nasty. Propane is always off when we're on the move.
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:40 PM   #16
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We always have it on while on the road, except when putting gasoline in the motorhome fuel tank. Also, when we gas up, we make sure the water heater is off. Before we got the MH we had a TT for many years and also travelled with the fridge on, otherwise the temp in the fridge and freezer get too high and are impossible to get back down.
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Old 07-22-2012, 01:07 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by safari57
Ask your insurance company what they want. My insurance company indicates that if my trailer catches fire while traveling and the cause can be determined as the propane fridge, they don't pay the claim. Same goes for if it is in an accident and then catches fire because the propane was left on - if I'm at fault they won't pay for my trailer, if the other driver is found at fault then it depends on whether his insurance will or not, and they suggest not likely that they will. Made my decision easy.

If you are serious about safety, also call your local fire department and ask them what they prefer given if you are in an accident it is often the fire department responds anyway, so what is their requirement?

Think about it, your fridge is a cooler when it is not turned on, so if you are not opening it while driving does it really need to be on?

With guidance from your insurance company and the fire department you can make a decision based on facts, not what the rest of us say or do.

Having seen more than one moho and trailer burnt to the axles on the highway, the latest in mid June on I-5 near Tumwater....................I could not bear to lose my rig that way. But that is just me.........
I would never rely on an insurance company for ” the facts”. If that tank on the front of your trailer gets crushed in an accident, it will explode whether it is turned on or off. If my insurance policy contained a clause that denied a claim for those stated reasons, I'd dump them in a New York minute. Thats tantamount to saying that if your car bursts into flames because you put gas in it, we wont pay. Crooks.
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Old 07-22-2012, 05:54 AM   #18
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Having seen more than one moho and trailer burnt to the axles on the highway, the latest in mid June on I-5 near Tumwater....................I could not bear to lose my rig that way. But that is just me.........
Was the fire you are referring to caused by propane? Trailers can burn from a variety of reasons.
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Old 07-22-2012, 08:29 AM   #19
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I have to point out the "green" movement to propane and compressed natural gas powered vehicles.

Their tanks are most certainly on in motion, in tunnels, on bridges, and on ferries.

The statements that bottles are "bombs" just waiting to leap into action and explode is simply not true.

Properly installed and MAINTAINED equipment is safe to use as designed.

In the case of RV refers, the manufactures of these devices most certainly have legal departments that allow them to say in the manual the device may be used underway. Not that the lawyer has any idea how it works, but he must believe that the situation is defendable in court.

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Old 07-22-2012, 08:54 AM   #20
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hi all-
i have a 57 flying cloud, newly restored with a replacement dometic dual electric and propane fridge. it obviously takes a while for it to get cold on propane. my question is can i turn it on the night before to get cold and then leave the propane on while driving? i have new tanks and new regulator. i know i must put things into the fridge cold.
thanks.
chris
On my last 2 outing I ran the fridge and a small cooling fan on 12v with no problems, using the TV to charge trailer battery. I ran 8 gauge wire to battery, battery to 12v control panel 8 gauge, control panel to fridge with 12 gauge wire. Will not run with propane

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Old 07-22-2012, 09:15 AM   #21
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This week I had the opportunity to re-read the manual for my frig and learned a couple of things.

The manual specifically talks about running the frig while moving, it keeps the liquid ammonia in the coils from pooling (the reason you want to be level when stopped). It also mentions a feature that I'm curious to know if I have. It's got to due with an alternator circuit. With this feature if you turn the engine off to the TV the flame on the propane system shuts off (at least that's the way I understood it). I suspect this feature may be limited to motorhomes so I don't think it's something a trailer has but sounds like a nice feature.

My last RV was a class "B" motorhome and I never drove with the frig on but I started driving with the A/S frig on partly based on reading this forum and partly based on the Dometic manual and talking to other RV owners.
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Old 07-22-2012, 03:01 PM   #22
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The insurance contract determines what they will pay for. Of course, it is subject to interpretation, but if it does not specifically say the propane must be off when traveling, you have a good argument based on custom and the manufacturer's assurances it is ok.

Asking an agent or someone at the insurance company who just answers phones is the way to get wrong answers.

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Old 07-23-2012, 12:37 AM   #23
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The insurance contract determines what they will pay for. Of course, it is subject to interpretation, but if it does not specifically say the propane must be off when traveling, you have a good argument based on custom and the manufacturer's assurances it is ok.

Asking an agent or someone at the insurance company who just answers phones is the way to get wrong answers.

Gene
You are right, Gene, but by the same token that could also go for asking on any forum what one should do. Every one has their opinion. How many are actually experts with specific knowledge to speak to the issue at hand and how many are armchair specialists with some basic knowledge but not the level of detail an insurance company, an accident investigator/adjuster laying responsiblity, and ultimately a legal firm will bring to bear. If they can find a way to not have to pay, they will do so with considerable vigor. Not a game I wish to play.
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Old 07-23-2012, 06:58 PM   #24
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We keep our on and going while we travel or are hooked up to a meter electrical source as propane is cheaper than gas. There are a few tunnels where you are warned it must be shut off, so the assumption is, it is OK to travel with it on, or it would be posted every where.

We still have the original fridge from day one in our 1972 International. A few weeks back, while we were transiting from one location to another I switch to electric while it sat at the house. No problem or issues. I did notice though that when I went to switch back, it was disconnected from the power for about six hours, it still clicked when I went to turn off the electric switch in the fridge before I wet out to the switch inside fridge and panel in the side to turn on the gas. So one is to assume it was running off the battery while it was disconnected from "shore power"? With it being very cold there was no loss of temperature. t I was rather impressed, helped the refrigeration out by removing a bottle of white wine and drinking it, thus ensuring the fridge had less to keep cold. We also need to do our part on keeping these 40 plus year old systems still functional.

I don't have the manual here to read up on the mutli purpose systems, ac/gas/DC? but was rather impressed with this technology from 40 years ago.

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Old 07-23-2012, 08:34 PM   #25
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I did a little survey of people I tow with or know who tow trailers as to whether they tow with fridge on or propane off. Basically half do (5), 3 never do (includes me), and two have when they have "fragile food" whatever that means, but typically do not, saying maybe twice a camping season.

Just thought it was interesting to ask the folks I hang with and was surprised at how many do leave theirs on. I jokingly told them I'd meet them at the CG rather than travel with them and risk being cooked on the highway. One was even lets just say impolite till he realized I was pulling his chain

Most of those who leave theirs on do so because they were told to do so by the sales guys at the dealership when given their run-through.
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:22 PM   #26
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Propane tanks really explode and only after exposed to flame with a leak. And then very rarely because the propane just burns as it comes out. Then if they don't leak it takes very hot temps for a long period to get them to blow trailer fire probably wouldn't do it. It could but the fire will burn out before temps get high enough and long enough to blow it. (tried it, don't ask)4

I have shot ( don't ask) many different size propane tanks with different types of bullets and NEVER had one explode. It just hisses out in about 5+ seconds or so, depending on the size.

The vapors from filling you tank are so dispersed buy the time it reaches your trailer it is just about impossible for it to ignite. Camper top or motorhome is different. We are talking trailers here. You have a better chance of igniting vapors from static spark from your hand.

So if running with it off makes you feel safer, good, but in reality, and probability, it really doesn't. Sorry.
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:35 PM   #27
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Propane tanks really explode and only after exposed to flame with a leak. And then very rarely because the propane just burns as it comes out. Then if they don't leak it takes very hot temps for a long period to get them to blow trailer fire probably wouldn't do it. It could but the fire will burn out before temps get high enough and long enough to blow it. (tried it, don't ask)4

I have shot ( don't ask) many different size propane tanks with different types of bullets and NEVER had one explode. It just hisses out in about 5+ seconds or so, depending on the size.

The vapors from filling you tank are so dispersed buy the time it reaches your trailer it is just about impossible for it to ignite. Camper top or motorhome is different. We are talking trailers here. You have a better chance of igniting vapors from static spark from your hand.

So if running with it off makes you feel safer, good, but in reality, and probability, it really doesn't. Sorry.
I was waiting for the voice of sanity. These exploding propane posts are about as likely as the Hollywood shows in which every car explodes....they don't....they burn. And like I suspect with RV's and trailers....the VAST majority of automotive fires are electrical fires. The rest are underhood fuel leaks WITH a very hot exhaust manifold ignition source (not present with RV propane systems). A few are coolant fires....YES coolant is flamable, under certain precise circumstances.
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Old 07-23-2012, 11:10 PM   #28
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Chris,


'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '

Some places restrict the use of propane on bridges and tunnels requiring you to turn the cylinders off. These are mostly in the northeast and Va. Last I checked Nova Scotia and Manitoba required cylinders be turned off.

Enjoy your new to you FC.

Gene
Chris,

Even closer to you:

You must have the propane cylinders turned off before boarding a Washington State Ferry. If I remember right they put tape over the valves, so they can tell if you turn them on again.

Propane tanks do explode under certain conditions. A couple of years ago there was a wild fire about 10 miles from us. While I was watching the smoke from out back yard, I heard a very load explosion. I learned later that is was one of those large residence size LPG tanks.

However we always travel with the propane on.

Ken
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